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SERIALS SECTIW 
VA STATE LIBRART 
RIQHMOHD YA 23219 



Tisachers 




on new pay raise 



Rv DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

Faculty representatives of the Virginia Beach 
Education Association (VBEAIMH meet t«l«y 
to plan further strategy in their pay iMitUe with 
the Virginia Beach School Board. 

William Krupp, VBEA president, indicated 
after a special School Board meeting Tuesday 
that his group is not satisfied with the Board's 
latest pay raise plan. 

Teachers meeting at Plaza Junior High School 
-i today at 4:30 p.m. are expected to recommend 
** that the VBEA ask City Council to return the 



school budget to the School Board for farther 
consideration of teacher salaries, Mr. Krupp 
said. 

THE SCHOOL BOARD voted Tuesday to use 
$515,000 in unexpected state revenue to raise 
teachers' salaries for 1974-75 approximately 9.5 
per cent more than the current rate. Mr. Krupp 
said the teachers "are not going to be happy" 
with the Board's action. 

Richard Gordon, VBEA executive directw, 
exiH-essed anger after the meeting; claiming that 
the Board used a "technicality" in refusing to 
negotiate further on teacher salaries. The VBEA 



wants salaries raised 10 per cent more than the 
current base rate, excluding amnial increment 
raises for teacho- experience. • 

During Uie two-hour School Board meeting, 
representatives of the VBEA as wdl as matqr 
teachers who said they were n<4 VBEA membov 
addressed the Board on the salary question. 

Virginia Beach School Bus Drivers' 
Association members also addressed the Board. 
Barbara Ford, president of the association, read 
a prqured statement asking the Board to 
recognize the importance rf the bus drivers. 

The drivers will meet today with membere d a 
Schod Board committee to discuss ,|iut^drtvc|s' 



salaries. 

MR. KRUPP READ a prepared statement to 
Board members sayii« that the latest pay ra^e 
for teachers was a step in Uie right direction bit! 
asked the Board to re-open salary negotiations. 
Mr. Gordon read a similar statement to the City 
Council Monday. 

School Board Chairman Robert H. DeFord Jr. 
said that no further "informal" salary meetings 
between the Board and Qie VBEA could be held 
since the Board has agreed to establish a formal 
procedural agreement for negotiating with the 



VBEA next year. 

Mr. Gordon claimed that Mr. DeFord was 
ining a technicality to e|id ^salary talks with 
teachersand asked how the current |N*eblemcan 
be resdved. " « 

"I Just don't know how we can go any further," 
Mr. DeFord replied. 

The Schod Board chairman then read a 
prepared statement saying that the tfoard "will 
not debate" the salary issue. He pointed out that 
tiie Boardand VBEA have been told to prepare 
for formal talks in the fall to discuss teacher 
salaries and oUier matters for 1975-76. 



Wliere The 
Action 1*1 

Sun ClanH ieds 

For Ptoion to Peison S«v 
vice, CALL 486-3433. 
466-3434. 



Wtdnnday, April 3, 1974 



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Copyright 1>74 
■••ch Publl$>iln9 Corp. 



16 Cents 



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A real piece of Junk 



Have vou ever felt that you were driving a 
niece of iunis? Has the cost of living forced you 
to keep that old rustbucket another year? Are 
the fenders gone and the body corroded? Take 



heart! Your pile of Junk is in better shape than 
this pile of iunk. spied quietly rustfatg away on 
some cleared |and behind^ Princess ^ne 
Pla/a. (Sun ph^to by Rod Mann) ^ 



SUBSIDIZED HOUSING 

Changing a low income stigma 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

Water ran down the interior walls of the three- 
bedroom house in the Virginia Beach Borough 
everytime it rained. The old, leaky roof sagged and 
looked as though it was ready to collaspe. The house 
was the home of the Jonathan Welsh family. 

So poorly insulated was the house that the oil 
heating bills sometimes soared to $40 per month. 
Mr. Welsh (not his real name), who was employed 
by a moving company, made $110 a week. But, after 
the house rental of $110 per month and the utihties, 
there was barely enough money to care for his wife 
and four children. Though he wanted better 
hmising, there was none available he could afford. 

Mr. Welsh's lani||#d had been told about the poor 
conditions of the hoiBC but refused to do anything 
about them. The Welsh's finally be<fflme desperate 
when then* infant child was constantly sick because 
of the exposure to the cold, damp weather. 



■A (substandard) house 
is hot a homeHHHHHMMM 



ri 



This is the second article of a three-part series in which 
Sun Staff Writer Linda MiUer examines the problem of sub- 
standard hou^g In Vir^tia Beach. 



*3 <^. 



THE FAMILY went in search of better housing. 
They were one of the lucky fi«^lJes. They qtiaM^i 
and were accepted as residents imder a rent sup- 
plement program in a low-moderate income 
housing project known as Atlantis Apartments. 
(Their house was condemned by the Public Health 
Department after they moved out.) 

Atlantis Apartments on South Birdneck Road 
looks no di^rent ttan any erf the city's multi- 
famiry cdffiplexes. Tliey may rot be as hecurieus as 
some apartments, but the big difference between 
Atlantis and other apartments is that they are 
providmg standard living conditions for persorm 
that otherwise would be Mving in pow h<Hising or 
unable to find any affwdable housing. 

There is a stigma about low moderate income 
housing— a belief ttmt It always has to apprar run 
down and will cause (tevaluatiwi of surrounding 
property. There is also a feeling among many 
persms that poorer families don't really want 
better housing, and comequently, won't take care 
of it. 

THOSE WHO LIVE m «■ manage the city's large 
federally subsidized crnnplei^ dm't believe that 
stt^a hi» to exist. While views (Uffer about what 
makes the \m\. iwusing develq>ment, most persons 
inwlved in the jwtjjecte agree Uiat they are working 
despite their pi^M»ns, and there should be moce 
hoeing for p«9M» in tte tow-moderate imt^ 
iH-adcM. 

Two <rf Om fou- ma^ low-modavte income 
howu^ ir^^ts w«« begun by ctmcemed nmn- 
bers erf area diwdwa. Chie is run by a iMmi«^t 
m^idzatim) and the fAbex is a (rivate bu8ine« 
venture. AU of Oe projects w«» buUt with federal 



<i 



funds, and some of the dwelling units (rffer 
residents a rent supplem«Jt jrtan (the federal 
government makes up the difference between what 
the tenant pays and the market value of the 
apartment). There is a total of 557 dwelling units 
with from one to five bedrooms. But, there is a 
waiting list at each apartment complex of 200 to 300 
persons or families who still need housuig. 

"The phone is constantly ringing with persoiK 
seeking housing,',' says Sandy Morgan, manager of 
Friendship Village. "They (the city) could get rid <rf 
all the run-down hoDse^ here if they'd build mwe 
lower rent projects, enough to meet the needs (rf 
those who are lo<*ing for housing." Ip. 

FRIENDSHIP VILLAGE is the only totally 
subsidized housing project in the city. It was built 
with federal funcb and each family's nncome is 
computed to determine their rent. They i»y 25 per 
cent of their adjusted income, with the federal 
government making up the diffo^nce between 
JidrjmUnd the apartmcffltls market value Jihere 
arerentceiUngs which tTte total familylncoine may 
not exceed if they are to receive federal aid. 

All hoiiBsing appUcations are carefully screei»d. 
Applicants are interviewed by the City Healtti 
Defnrtment, as well as by board member (rf the 
Fri«ids HoiBing CorporaUwi. In onter to g^ 
fedeitl subsidy, all an>lications must then be 
apiR-oved by the state branch <rff ice of Housing and 
Urban Develt^ment (HUD) in Richmond. 

Friencbhip Village was started by the Friemte 
Church. It is umter the management of Kutz and 
Fentr«s Realty. Ms. MOTgan admits th«« are 
pr(*tems in the Village, partially due to the lai^e 
number (rf diil^oi that (he com[rt» h(NBes. But, 
she says the biggest {»t4>tem is p^sois movij^ hi 
who have iwver had good housing and cton't know 
"how to (to tld^s like light a stove." She had one 
1^ who h«} always sontfH^ ho- floora with lye 
wm, and washed tte hanl wood flon^ in the 
ifMTtaiait in the same manna*. 

RESDENI^ ARE FAIRLY amtoit ui the 
Village, thoi^h some tennto say ttait Ms. M(rpn 
has "ho- ^da" iha favorite taiants). MaiiUy, the 

(Sm HOUSING, pa9«A-8j 



No tax increase forecast 
for $93.3 million budget 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sui. surf Writer 

The Virginia Beach City Council got a 
pedc Mcmday at the largest budget in the 
city's history. But the new $93,304,6(M 
budget, which is up more than $11 milliwi 
dollars over last year's budget, does not 
mean a tax increase for Beach residents. 

Presented by City Manager Roger 
Scott, the proposed budget for fiscal year 
1974-75 represents a 12.3 per cent, or 
$11,464,311, increase over the current 
budget. Mr. ScoU calls the increase 
"minimal" considering the cost of living 
increased by 10 per cent over the last year 
and the city population ha^ continued to 
prtMiv 10 per cent annually. 

to coroida-ing the cost dt living, the 
budget pN»vide8 for a Viz per cent cost-of' 
Qvta^ fai» if) pay for all general (dH9' 
govemrtient eniphv«- The pay hike far 
4be eai(ri6ye^ will coat the General Fund 
"approximately $1 million. (The new pay 
scale, to go into effect Oct. 1, also will 
boost, thecity manager's salary by $2,400 a 
year— bringing his annual connpensadon 
to $37,060.) 

THR RAISES will exc^de 8cho(d 
employes, who are currently scheduled to 
receive pay hikes from 7.08 per cent to 10 
per cent. Constitutional officers (such as 
the steriff and the Commonwealth's 
Attorney), their emfrfoyes and the VPI 
Extension Service staff will receive pay 
raises only if the state agreestojiwy its pro 
rata share. 

The largest increase in the budget is the 
$4,300,319 increase to the school budget. 
The increase provides for about a 
$1,232,000 addition to the compensation for 
school teachers. The teachers, however, 
have said the increase is not suff icioit, and 
the schoirt board has been working to come 
up with other funds for salaries. The total 



school board budget is now pr(4>osfld at 
$41,610,015. 

The Community Services Department 
budget, which includes streets, refuse, 
inspections and consumer protection 
divisions, is up by about $350,000. Included 
in that budget, Mr. Scott proposes to 
create a Minimum Housii^ Inspection 
Bureau to better enforce the city's 
minimum housing code. Taking the code 
enforcement from the State Department of 
Health and supporting it with locar funds, 
the budg^ allows $59,349 for the new 
department to employ a superintendent of 
minimum housing, three inspectors, a 
clerk-typist and the necessary e(|uipment. 

THE PUBLIC SAFETY and Social 
Services Departments' budgets are also up 
this y«ir. Mr. Scott proposes to increase 
the fvMs to diepoHce and firvdiviidaM by 
f7m,^and rec(Rnmends the employment 
of 17 additional policemen and 24 new paid 
firefljj^rs. The increase in binds to the 
Social Services Department is due to new 
state and federal guidelines and 
programs. The city is contributing an 
additional $486,877 to the department with 
the state adding $350,998 in funds. 

For the first time in the budget, there 
are recommendations lot contributions to 
local arts groups. The Council established 
a Commission on the Arts and Humanities 
last summer to hear requests for city 
hinds. Pn^Kwed in tiie budget is $2,100 for 
the Virginia Beach Friends of Music, 
$2,000 for the Virginia Beach Civic 
SymphoiQT, $2,720 for the Dance Guild of 
Virginia and $800 opa>ating funds for the 
arts commission. 

Not knowing exactly what it win cost to 
get a mass U-ansit system g(^ng in Virginia 
Beach, Mr. Scott proposes to set aside 
$190,000 In a contingency fund for mass 
transportation. The city has agreed to 
underwrite Uie cosU of Tidewater Metro < 



Transit service to Uie Beach unUl Uie 
Tidewater Transportation District can 
establish a regional service. 

THE BUDGET also set aside a fund for 
implementing the managed growth 
program, as well as a reserve account in 
Uie anticipation of future fuel and energy 
costs. The managed growth funds are 
$250,000, and $200,000 is alloted for fuel 
price increases. 

WIUi tiie 1974-75 budget. Mr. Scott also 
proposes toesUiblish a Reserve for Capital 
Improvements Fund. The fund is to be held 
in reserve, added to each year and when It 
reaches a sufficient level will allow tiie 
city to make certain needed capiUil 
improvemento wlUiout using long-term 
borrowing. Mr. Scott calls It "Uie 
beginning of a partial wy-as-you-go 
program," and recommends $500,000 to 
establish Uiat fund tiiis year. 

All of Uie increases are possible wiUicut 
a tax Bicriasi!, according to the city 
manager All of Uie city's real estate Uuc 
assessment rates remain the same, 
ranging from $1.56 to $1.70 applied to each 
$100 of assessed value (A real estate, 
depending on the borough. The assessment 
ratio is 60 per cent of Uie fair market 
value. Personal prtqwrty tax on Items such 
as automoMles and boats is $6 per $100, 
which to also based on an assessment of 60 
per cent of Uie fair maricet value. 

Though the rates remain imchanged, 
becaiae of tiie area's new construction and 
rising property values, the city wtlmates 
it will receive more Uuin $4 million in 
general property taxes than it did in tiie 
1973-74 ftecal year. Other local tax 
revenues are atoo expected to be up by 
more Uian $2 million and state funds to Uie 
d^ have risen by $4 million. Federal 
money to ttie city Is expected to drop by 
about $8,000. 



Burtlen on developers 



Managed growthplan revealed 



In recc^izing Uie need to 
upgrade city services and 
protect the Beach's 
environment, the Managed 
GrawUi Proposal presaited to 
ttie Virginia Beach City CouncU 
last wedc would place the 
bunien on the developer. 

If re(»mmendationB for the 
managed growth plan are 
adc^Med, it will be up to Uie laiMJ 
developer J) prove Uiat existing 



facilities and services (like 
water and sewer)- are adequate 
for hte construction even if he 
has the proper zoning. If 
facilities and servicel are not 
adequate and Uie devel(q)er 
wants to speed up construcdon, 
he can pay for the services. If he 
waits for the city to provide Uie 
services he may be aUowed a 
tax relief. In addition, the 
develops (rf large- projects will 




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jMaietd for ■ locM ntMniMptr. My Aim 

"Vir^i^ Mirii M$ inmM # idod 
iwuMmipir ttf to (MRi fv • kw^ ttnc. 
And Th« &m to Mng Jim that*-J.H., 



For home deUvery phone 486-3430 



tetlde TMi W«ck 



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be required to fUe an 
Environmental Impact 
Analysis that will be used to 
approve <»■ surest altniMtives 
to Uie developed proposal. 

But, if a develops wan& a 
change in zoning, he will be 
required to file an 
Environmental Impact 
Analysis (which may be used to 
deny hto application) ««J a 
revenue-expenditurr Wllysis 
(showing anticipated revoiues 
of Uie project and the cost to the 
city for Improvemeits as weU 
as deciding if he wiU wait or pay 

^ for services. That procedure 
will have to be followed wheUier 
Uie developer to or to not In 
compliance wiOi the city's 

t^^-*wl»jpW!Hirplan --a 
proposal which also has yet to 
be worked out. If a Beveloper to 
nqt in compliance wiUi the city's 
pi'oposed develoimient plan, Uie 
Council would have to change 
Uiat development |rian before he 
could get hto zonii« change. 

THE CITY sUff has 
examined a number of 
managed {tens now in extotence 
in cities around Uie country. 
They have rejected ttie Idea d 
Arect mUraiiM on frowtti. 
Some Calif(»nia and Ftarida 
cities have adopted restraiiris 
mich as cdUngs on the number 
of dwelli^ uirits tiiat may be 
MHtructed in die (jty. 

The Invenbffy eompikd by 
the Beach as a purt of the 
managed growth preaertation 
shows Uiat 91,308 of ttie city's 
165,000 acMi of tauid and water 
area remain undeveloped. 
About 33,000 aa» d that ^1 
are toned resideatial and ouM 



acc(8nmodate ao,637 additional 
residento. 

Councilman Charles Gardner 
indicated Monday he will 
present a resdution , to the 
Council in a two weeks to 
auUiorize Uie city manager to 
go ahead witii further 
refinement of the $4.3 million 
growth management pn^iasal. 




Closed 
council 

Tte Vta^nto Bcaeh CIfy 
CaDncH met MoMay for 2t 
miiwtes hi elflsed Mulao, 
apen to neither ttie pHbllc 
nw the press. The agenda 
Hsted a "lepl" matte- fa- 
dtoeasslea. The CmmII 
heM aa addidraal clescd 
Ksrim tost week t« dbcMS 
the sclMel beai^ badgeL 
That meetlRg hsie* far «M 
haw aad IS ntaa^. la 13 
mecttap s« far Ms year, 
tlw CoiaeH has net for 
aevea hoars aad twa 
niaute* kehind closed 



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Comment 




Page A-2-The Sun-Wadneiday, AprH 3, 1974 



t: An editorial: 

Mass movement 



H. 



\ 



"Wo'rB out ofgaM. Honewt 



II 




The future of our urban areas— 
and thus our general econoniic 
health— is in ieopardy unless the 
U.S. Congress enacts legislation t« 
provide operating subsidies for the 
natron's ailing mass transit 
networks^ri^ 

So claims William J. Ronan, 
chairman of the New York State 
Metropolitan Transporl^ation 
Authority. Mr. Ronan, who is also 
president of the Institute for Rapid 
Transit, warns that if some of the big 
cities have to cut service sharply or 
raise fares, all Americans will 
suffer. 

Mr. Ronan says he is no "anti- 
hii^way zealot," but he does put 
most of the blame for public 
transit's decline in recent decades 
on the federal government's 
massive subsidizaticm of highway 
building— to the serious 
disadvantage of public 

transportation. According to Mr. 
Ronan, less than 30 years ago, the 
country's bus, trolley and subway 
systems returned a profit of 11 cents 
for every dollar deposited in the fare 
box. Today, he says, mass transit 
loses 23 cents for every dollar it 
collects. 

NOW. MOST PRIVATE 

operators have been driven out of 



Ciiyslde 



By Undaimmer 



Multiple choice 
name of game 

The Virginia Beach City Council found them- 
selves faced with a multiple choice question con- 
cerning a use permit Monday. They could: 

(a) reconsider issuance of the use permit i 

(b) defer reconsideration of the use permit; 

(c) defer consideration of reconsideration of 
issuance of the use permit to give the city attorney 
time to consider the legalities; 

(d) refuse the reconsider the use permit at all. 

The dilemma arose over the rise of the mini- 
Virginia Beach Festival Park (known as Atlantis) 
at the south end of Atlantic Avenue under a two- 
year use permit. The Council approved a con- 
ditional use permit for the amusement park at their 
March 4 meting. 

Residents of the south end of the beach — 
predominately innkeepers — were opposed to the 
park's construction, although they had not objected 
at the Planning Commission hearing or the 
previous Council hearing on the use permit. Though 
theycton't mind seeing the park in Virginia Beach, 
they don't want it built next to them and fear after 
the two years are up the park will remain. So, the 
residents asked that the use permit application be 
heard again. (The park owners were issued the 
temporary permit so they could purchase rides at 
present prices while developing the park's per- 
manent site off South Birdneck Road. ) 

On the other side — the park owners told the 
Council they had ordered $400,000 worth of rides 
from a foreign manufacturer — with $100,000 being 
iwn-refundable. 

"A forei^ government does not return money at 
the whim of what the City Council decides to do," 
the park president told the Council. 

After considering the reconsideration, the 
Council decided it was best to drop the matter and 
kill the possibility of future multiple choice 
questions on the use permit. They did so by simply 
refusing to second the motion by Vice-mayor Reid 
Ervin to reconsider the issuance of the i©e permit, 
so the two-year permit stands. 

AN OBS(Sa<JE.PH0|iP palter may not get 
exactly what ^ bargains for. 

One such caller who dialed Cecily Macdonald's 
home number, got this rej^y: "When you hear the 
tone, please leave your name and number, and I 
will call you back." Mrs. Macctonald, a candidate in 
the Virginia Beach City Council race, has an an- 
swering machine which records all hd- callers 
when ste is not at home. In this case, however, the 
caller did not leave his name or number. 

YOU'VE HEARD OF beaiffacratic jargon? Any 
time tl» City Planning Department presents an 
idea io the City Cwincil, the councilmen will ask 
how they plan to put the idea into action. The 
Planning Department's standard answer is "Well, 
we first have to develop a mechanism to implement 
that idea." Translated, that jargon means "we've 
got the ictea, now if we can just figure out a way to 
do it." 



business. Urban transit is almost 
entirely a government 

responsibilii)^ Mr. Ronan says a 
f^eral subsHi^ fdr mass transit 
v^ld have bmefits that would 
spread far beyoi^the cities, such 

• an immediate/ relaxation in 
the energy crisisr' 

• a dramatic reduction in air 
pollutim; 

• a decline in inflation if fares 
are held down; 

• more mobility for tlrose who 
cannot afford or operate 
autom^iles. 



Itr^rginia Beach, Carolina 
Tr£iilways has stopped all bus 
seriHpe except its terminal to 
terminal express between the 
Beach and Norfolk simply because 
the routes lost money. The 
Tidewater Transportation District 
Commission is trying to establish a 
regional bus system, but even the 
commission is looking to the federal 
government for about 80 per cent (or 
$13 million) of the funds to start the 
system. 

Perhaps as Mr. Ronan conclude, 
it is time "we face up to a basic 
fact— mass transit, like public 
health and social security, is a 
national responsibility." 




An Im^tmdmt Newut^ia- 



OAVI0ltDCAII 



STAI, MARTIN NEAL BHITTOW SIMS 



KWMU i£A (XJMKER 



JAMES C, BIK)WN 




Letters from 
our readers 



MA(M nauaNW ccmkmation 



Hot air 



Sir: 

It is bad enough that the pubUc has 
l)een taken so badly on the gas 
shortage, but the crowning blow is that 
station after station has conveniently 
"broken" its air hose. 

One way to stretch gas, as well as 
la^serve tires, is to keep them properly 
inflated, but now,we can't even do that 
much. Are we supposed to ride for 
miles kMking tot an operable hose? 

I request that owners be fined for 
broken hoses. I'll bet their inside hoses 
(those they use to fbc flats) are all 
workii^. 



They should also be required to post 
prices and to reduce traffic jams. The 
so called cut-rate stations are charging 
more than the name brands! 

Harry Jeavons 



Sub¥Brsl¥9 class 



sir: 

A recent iraue of U.S. News and 
World Report stated that at Irast 60 
aiiks to Congre^men signed up tor a 
eaane on "American Imperialism" 
beii« conducted by left-wii% actress 
Jane Fonda and irar Inisband, Tom 
Hayden. Mr. and Mrs. Hayden were 
given permission to use a room <rf the 
House of Representatives Committee 
<m the District of Cdumtxa, and in ttieir 
course, wfll attempt to show that all 
U.S. aid t« Sourth Vietnam should be 
cutoff. 



Why were the Haydens given 
permission to use a room in the House 
of ReiNresentattves? Did the aides 
attmdb^ tiw course ngn up on tbdr 
own? If not, who a^ested ttwy 
attoid? What ebe wiU be "tai^t" 
during d^ course by ttiis coupie? Last 
but Mit let^ what s tte coiffse (»stlflg 
tt» tajqM^rs? 



Mk*m.lMU^ 



Forum 



Wise choices 



Sir: 

This year the recipiaits <rf the 
National Council of Christians and Jews 
Brotherhood Awards were most 
outstanding. 



In people like Frederick J. 
Napolitano, Mrs. Bien Paul Snyder and 
Dr. Lyman Brooks, the contimied well 
being of the community is assured. 

I would like to commend the Council 
for its wise choices. 

Rvan J. McCorkle 



mass transportation f (»* the purpose of 
educational progress Thank God for the 
schod bus drivers, wherever they are. 

JoveM. Atwood 



Driving force 



sir: 

As the Virginia Beach Public School 
System has grown, so has the role of the 
public school bus driver. Without them, 
its successful implementation would be 
difficult 

Our school bus fleet has grown in 
excess of 300 units. It is an asset to our 
c ity's progress. However, these units do 
not function without skilled hands of 
jHtrfessional drivers! Each driver is 
required to complete defensive driving 
courses. Most have completed first aid 
courses. Certain tests must be 
c(»npleted satisfactorly before at the 
wheel training begins. Indeed, the drive 
is well [H-epared to execute the duties of 
a school bus driver before being 
assigned to a unit. 

A professional attitude in executii^ 
the role cf a schod bus driver is 
instilled in the mind of all. It is a serious 
business — one we do not treat lighUy. 
The future citizens and leaders of our 
city have been entrusted to our care. To 
deny them less than a professionally 
trained driver is to deny safe 
transpcHlation to and from school. An 
excellent example of the unexpected 
hazards craifronting a driver was the 
recent snow storm. In the height of ite 
fury all drivers were called upon early 
to take the diildren home. The school 
bus drive- is capable of executing his 
duty in ai^ given situatiwi. His ability 
tffftmction in many roles places him in 
a field of professioijally trained 
penHxinel. 

It b understandable why the driver^- 
wtth tbdr need to be placed in prop^ 
perqwctive. To ignore their j)Im for 

reasonable and just cMnpensation is to 
indicate a lack of recognition for 
important role Uiey play in 
successful implementatim of oiir 
public education program, ff 

WiUJOut the transporation system in 
our city, the entire alucaUonal {n-ocns 
would foil. What good is an educational 
system that denies a (Aik) {»rtidpatiba 
for tack of transportation? We, |in 
Virgiiiia Beach, are fortunate to have 
die means by which every child mipit 
obtain he specific need. Our Pubic 
School Transportation System Is 
available to aU stuctents in the city. I 

Wittj contimied strlvii*. b<^ by ^ 
siq>ervisors and the drivers, to meet the 
ever increasing demands piaced upon 
it, the transportation system in ttiis cit 
wiU OHrtinue to p«f orm ^ecUvely ar 

effk^dy. 

To rtci^iize its vate is toracourai 
its ma^ daUcated peMnneL 1^ say 
the ieut, transportation systen^ and 
ttidr «npk>yes are the uMOg Mroes ci 
ev«y aehoct systan dqiesdlfig i9<» 



The Sun wtleome$ off letten froni'its read- , 
en. Names will be withheld on request, but 
please include your name and telephone num- 
ber with your letter. Letters are subject to 
editing to meet newspaper style and spa^e re- 
qubements. Write: Forum, Virginia BeachSun, 
138 Rosemlmt Rd., V^nia Beach, Va. 23451 

r^n 

For your information, listed 
below are regular meeting times 
and places for public bodies in 
, Virginia Beach. All meetings are 
open to the public except when the 
groups vote to convene in executive 
(closed) session. 

City Council meets every 
Monday at 2 p.m. in the City 
Council chambers (seccmd floor) 
of city hall in the municipal center 
complex off Princess Anne Road. 

Planning Commission meets on 
the second Tuesday of each month 
at 1 p.m. in City Council chambers. 

School Board meets the third 
Tuesday of each month at 2 p.m. in 
the school administration building 
in the municipal center complex. 

Development Council meets the 
third Tuesday of each month at 
4:30 p.m. at the Vepco building on 
First Colonial Road near Hilltop 
Plaza. 

Eroeion Commission meets the 
third Tuesday of each month at 4 
p.m. at the F&M Bank building at 
31st Street and Pacific Avenue. 

Parks and Recreation Com- 
mission meets the second Wed- 
nesday of each month at 3 p.m. in 
City Council chambers. 

Arts and Humanities Com- 
mission meets ttie second Tiwsday 
of each month at 4:30 p.m. at the 
Vepco building on First Colonial 
Road. 

Wetlands Board meets the ttiird 
Tu^day aS each month at 9:30 a.m. 
in City Council chambers. 

LitwBry Board meets the first 
Monday of each month at 10:30 
a.m. at the Kempsville branch 
lilrary on Kempsville Road. 

IN ADDITION, listed below are 
addresses and telephone numbers 
for U.S. congressmen. Tlie city <rf 
Virginia Beach is in two 
congressional (ttshicts. 
* Rep. G. William Whitehurst 
( s^xmd coi^essional district ) , 424 
Cannon House Office Building, 
Washington, D.C. MSIS. PhMie 1- 
202-225-4215. 

Rep. Robert W. Daniel Jr. 
(f mirth congressional district), 
1331 Longworth House Office 
BuikUng. Washii^twi, DC. 20515. 
Phone 1-202-225^365. 

Sen. William L. Scott, 2121 
Dirfcsffl SoMte Office Building, 
Washti^tMi, D.C. 20610. Pbam 1- 
20ll-2S-2Qe3. 

Sen. Harry F. Byrd, 417 RosseU 
Senate Office Building, 
Wasltti«tem, DC. 20610. Phone 1- 
202*225-4024. 




By 

Sims 

Sun Editor 



yVho's to blame 
for unfairness? 



President Nixon, of all people, is worried about 
reforms in election campaigris. No matter about the 
barn door and the horse, the man actually takes 
himself seriously. After all, if anybody should know 
about campaign abuses and behind-therback 
contributions he should. 

Nevertheless, one proposal has particular in- 
terest because it has nothing to do whatsoever with 
misdeeds of the candidates and their staffs. Oh, no. 
President Nixon is concerned about the conduct (rf 
the press. 

He has asked the Justice Department if 
legislation can be drafted that would give political 
candidates "greater assurance of recourse against 
slanderous attacks on them or their families." 

"SUPREME COURT decisions," he said, "have 
severely restricted a public figure's ability to gain 
redress against such grievances, but I would hope 
that specifically defined limits can be legislated by 
the Congress to prevent unscrupulous attacks on 
public figures." 

Me, for instance, he might have added. 
Remember, all along the President referred to 
press reports on Watergate as unscrupulous at- 
tacks and irresponsible journalism. Now, the 
deeper the investigation gets, more and more truth 
is being found in those "unscrupulous attacks." 

As for Congress defining specific limits for the 
press in reporting on public figures — any such 
effort would be a violation of the First Amendment, 
which reads "Congress shall make no law" 
abridging the freedom of the press. And that can 
only be interpreted as meaning no law, none, not a 
one. 

Anyway, fairness — by the press, the President 
or anyone else — cannot be legislated without 
results far worse than the original problem. 

ONE PROPOSAL under consideration by the 
Nixon administratidn is the adoption of a federal 
law similar to a Florida state law which requires 
newspapers to publish replies from candidates who 
consider themselves victims of "unscrupulous 
attacks" in the newspapers. 

The so-called "right of reply" law — while well- 
intended — is based in over-reaction to the point of 
being useless. While no one could claim that there is 
never any malicious news coverage, the general 
impression is that most newspapers are more than 
willing to publish all legitimate viewpoints and 
responses as part of its editorial forum! Thts one 
certainly is. 

A fecteral right of reply law could — in the end — 
actually render the press to be so inactive as to be 
irresponsible. As Florida Supreme Court Justice J. 
Boyd said, "Almost everyone whose name has be«i 
carried frequently in the news media has been 
offended at one time or another by stories or 
comments in which he disagrees." To give them 
space automatically, he notes, would either flood 
the newspaper with replies or discourage the paper 
from printing critical stories, analyses or 
editorials. 

PRESIDENT NIXON contemls that Ms concern 
is for honest citizens who may be discouraged from 
running for political office for fear of a defamatory 
attack in the press. He wants to "eliminate the 
danger of slander or libel as a deterrent to sedcing a 
public career." 

There is not one convincing example of a can- 
didate's career being thwarted by malicious 
reporting. Even those who face severe press 
criticism find sympathetic outlets in other 
newspapers or media, often even press en- 
dorsement. 

More than likely, President Nbcon is concerned 
about straight news reporting which is adverse to 
his per»>nal interests. Citing press irresponsibility 
as a factor in campaign reform is just an attempt to 
shift the blame elsewhere. 



How iosabseribe 




Many of our readers pitfer to get 
their personal copies of The Sun by 
mail. 

If you with The Sun to be mwM 
weekly to your home or business, mail 
us the coupon and service wHI begin 
immediately. 

Mail To: 

Virginia Beach Sun 
Circulation dept. ^ 
1 38 Rosemont Rd. 
Virginia Bsach, Vi. 23452 



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ten 




HASSLES 



By 

Oonna 
Hendrick 

Guts are what 
you gotta have 

It wasn't exactly on a par with the Academy 
Awards, but when WNOR's Jim Stanley intoned 
"...and the winner is...," I felt slight chills up my 
spine. And I already knew who the winner was. 

The reason I knew is because I helped choose 
her. And the reason I helped choose her is because I 
was asked to be one of the judges at the annual 
Kellam High School amateur talent show, iqwn- 
sored by the Kellam High Band Parents recently. 

Judging an amateur talent show is slightly more 
difficult than deciding whether to have mustard or 
pidcles on your hamburger and slightly less dif- 
ficult than deciding the moral implications of 
euthanasia. 

In other words, it's hard. 

WHEN JANE FUGATE. producer of the show, 
eloquently persuaded me to be a judge, I was 
flattered. I would have the onwrtunity to mingle 
with the elite of the amateur talent show judging 
crowd, among them Gerald Cole of Montgomery 
Ward. Judy Fields of Fields Dance Studio, Phil 
Brickner of WVAB, Joe Hoppel of WCMS and Jack 
Holmes of WRAP. 

What I didn't know is that you don't just decide 
who's best. Oh, no. You are given a sheet with a list 
of all performers (there were 20) and asked to rate 
rach performer or group in four categories. 

A contestant who didn't give much of a per- 
fwrnance but who was dynamite in the 
showmanship category might accumulate more 
total points than someone who gave a great per- 
formance but was "blah" in the appearance 
category. 

EACH PERFORMER could accumulate a top 
total of 10 points. That was broken down into points 
for performance "(0-3), showmanship (0-3), ap- 
pearance (0-2) and response (0-2), meaning 
audience response. 

But the hardest part wasn't in deciding how 
many points to give which performer in each 
category, although it sure wasn't easy. 

The hardest part came when each judge had to 
standup, turn around, face the audience and smile 
as a spotlight blinded us, while Jane Fugate happily 
announced who each of us was. 

I IMMEOIATELY decided to give each per- 
former extra points for the category of "guts," 
which wasn't one of the categories listed. Anyone 
who can get up on a stage before hundreds of people 
and perform alUlone while a spotlight is shining on 
them has got to have guts. 

I also decided to give Ms. Fugatea "guts" award. 
When the master of ceremonies, Jim Stanley of 
WNOR, didn't appear in time for ttie opening of the 
show, she stepped in like a trouper to introduce the 
judges and the first performer. 

Kellam's amateur talent ni^t is no small deal, 
either. Last year's winner, who performed at the 
opening (^ this year's show, was rock singer Jimmy 
Hopper, who turned professional after he to<* first 
prize. The Kellam amateur show may launch even 
more professional careers in the future. 

I DON'T KNOW if I'm supplied to reveal this, 
but the judging was mighty close. After the last 
number, we judges left the auditorium to 
"deliberateV in a small room while the Tidewater 
Twirlettes Baton and Drum Corps played some 
"deliberating" music. 

Judge Fields very cleverly brought along her 
podket electronic calculator to total up the final 
scores. If it hadn't been for the two bonus points 
each judge was allowed to give his or her "out- 
standing' ' act choice, we might still be deliberating. 

Ms. Fugate wouldn't let us sneak out the back 
door while our choices were being read to the 
audience. She made us face the music as the 
winners were announced. 

Who were they? Singer Holly Millis was first, 
rock group Flaming Blue Ice was second and 12- 
year-old ventrilo^ist Mark Chevalier was third. 

Yogi to lead seminar 

Yogi Amrit Desai, founder of the Yoga Societ>- of 
Pennsylvania, will conduct a three-day seminar 
b^inning Friday at the Aquarian Age Yoga. Center, 620 
14th St. 

Topics for the seminar include "The Dynamics of 
Meditation," "Spven Secrets of Self- Realization," 
"Rejuvenation Through Yoga Postures," f*i8 lectures on 
diet and breath conb'ol. 

¥(^1 uesai will perform a Yogic wedding cm Sunday 
atter his lecture. ' 

Details may be obtained from the Ai^arian Age Yoga 
Center, 425^14. 



I MB auri-weaneioay, Mprii j, i»/4— Hage m-j 



i t 



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i I 

I I 
1 

I I 

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t I 

• • 
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• • 
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ENGLISH BONE 
CHINA FLORALS 

• Exquisitely Beautiful 

• A Perfect and Unique 
Gift Idea 

• $15.00 to $45.00 

EUROPA IMPORTS 

HiUtop Square Shopping Center 
lit. OolonM Rd, & Le$kin Rd. 



focei 



Rod MoiMi 




when "in the ring" at Virginia 
Beach City Council sessions, Coun- 
cilman Charles Gardner may have 
a secret friend on his side. The 
cross— the Cape Henry Memorial 
Cross— on the city seal is behind Mr. 



Gardner at every , council meeting. 
Perhaps his crusades against ob- 
scene magazines and topless go-go 
dancers have something to do with 
it. 



Council 
hopefuls 
to speak 

All candidates for the May 
City Council elections have been 
invited to participate in 
separate forums this week and 
next at the Beach campus of 
Tidewater Community Cdlege 
(TCC) and the monthly meeting 
of the Council of Civic 
Organizations (CCO). 

The TCC forum will be today 
at noon in Building 252, sec<Hid 
floor. Candidates will be 
allotted time to present their 
idatf orms to TCC students,^^ then 
will answer students' questions. 

Dr. Tennant S. McWilliams, 
professor of history and social 
sciences, will moderate. 

Two of the candidates, Peter 
Joy and Philip Muldez, are 
sbidents at the college. 

Next week, candidates will 
participate in the CCO forum 
April 10 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Atlantic Pewweent Savings 
and Loan Association Building 
on Independence Boulevard at 
Haygood. 

The public is invited to attend 
the CCO fortmj, and civic league 
members have been asked 
to submit questions on 
candidate positims. 




WANTED 

Houses To SeH 

Anywhere in Va. Beach 

Por quick results and more cash iri your pocket . . '. 
let us sell your property. A competent staff of Profes- 
sional experts on duty and always available. 

CALL 497 4851 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginia Beach Blvd. at Aragona Blvd. 



Hare Krishna wins 
Circuit Court case 



Circuit Court Judge George 
W. Vakos has dismissed 
charges of soliciting without a 
permit against a follower of the 
Hare Krishna religious 
movement. Judge Vakos based 
his action Thursday on the 
grounds that City Manager 
Roger M. Scott acted 
arbitrarily on a request to 
renew the permit shortly befwe 
its expiration. 




I 



[linKth^iWne during an 
appeal by Douglas W. Duty, a 
member of the International 
Society for Krishna 
Counciousness, of his conviction 
last September in General 
District Court by Judge P. B. 
White of soliciting without a 
permit. He was fined flOO and 
court costs. 

Mr. Duty. 22, whose addre.ss 
was listed as a Krishna 



Co-ed Streak 
ends in arrests 



Police reported their first 
arrest of women and men 
streaking together Monday 
night. Authorities say two 
women and six men were 
charged with indecent exposure 
about 11 when apprehended 
running down 23rd Street in the 
buff. 

According to investigators, 
the group gathered behind the 
Zodiac Restaurant, disrobed 
and streaked down 23rd Street. 
They were apprehended by a 
patrolling unmarked police car 
as they reached Atlantic 
Avenue. 

Officials identified those 
charged with indecent exposure 
as Deborah Garrison, 19. 
Prosperity Road; Linda 
Beasley, 22. Whitman Lane; 



"Ibday^tthas 
tobe6¥ery 
businessmanli 
business? 



M'. Jtmf M. Rochi 
, Formtr Chiimin 0/ Ih* 
I Botrd ot Qaninl Uolon. 




"The vital business I refer to it 
EmployerSupportoffheGuard 
and Reserve. They represent 
30% of our trained military 
personnel, an integral part of 
the total force available, at a 
costofonly5% of the budget." 
I urge you to lend your assist- 
ance to the efforts of the 
Committee for Employer Sup- 
port of the Guard and Reserve 
by signing a Statement of 
Support Pledge Card. Partic- 
ularly during Employer Sup- 
port Week, April 1-6. o 
For Pledge Cards and infor- 
mation, simply write: Em- 
ployer Support, Arlington, Va. 
22202. Or contact' your local 
Guard or Reserve unit. 

Employer Support WMk (or the 
Guard and R«s«rvs, April 1-6. 



I 




IMMjOYIR SUPPORT OF 
THE GUARD & RESERVE 



NOW ()im:\ 

Ol |{ SH()WH()()\I 



/' III islii')! ( r 



(.ilt< «'- \nicllii 



"^11 niilic^- 1 <ii '^(lii 



EWTTATION 

We opened a showroom on April let, 1974, al 1737 - A Virginia Beach Blvd., 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23454, in Oceana Village in the same building as the 
Oceana Beauty Academy. Our new telephone number is 425-1293. Our 
hours will be as follows: 

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 9:30 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Thursday and 
Friday 9:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.; Saturday 9:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 
(Special hours for schools, churches, etc. by appointment in advance). 
Included in our expanded line are church and school carnival aipplies at 
special discount prices. You are cordially invited to visit with us. Items 
offered by mail must still be ordered by mail. 



riniihlp ' & pntpffiri^jp^ 

UUUUly y yiUyl JUwyw 



\. s ... li. 



12.. 12"*. 



EUROPA 

202-550 

Hilltop 
.SticKiwe. 



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(Same Building: Oceans Bnuty Academy) 



COUPON 

Bring thit coupon with you when you visit our showroom and receive the foUowing discounts on 
your purcham. (You must have this coupon for discount, only one (1) coupon per purchaK, on 
diowToom imrdiases only. Valid until Aprtt 13, 1974, do^ not apply to wholaale sal^, (<»upon 
■lone has no cad\ value on items on sale). 

,mthpurcha^o/$5.00lo$9.99 • 5% 

mthfmrchm Of $10.00 to $19.99 - • 10% 

mth punkete of $20.00 end up - ~ 20% 

(RMiMMto chuRAaa, KAooh md ckita n^ive exM ^wcW pric«i m tfiefe pwckaiM , 
fottanri^MdiMate.) \ 



William Carr, 29, Patton Lane; 
Charles Larson, 26, 24th Street; 
Robert Webber 26, S. Jefferson 
Street; Steven Paque, 26, 
Griffin Street, Portsmouth; 
Tyron Foy, 24, Plea.sant 
Avenue, Norfolk; and Benjamin 
Herndon, 29, Martin Avenue, 
Chesapeake. 

After being processed at the 
2nd Police Precinct the group 
was released to await a hearing 
scheduled for this morning in 
General District Court. 



movement temple on 34th 
Street, was arrested Aug, 8 . 
while soliciting donations from 
a plain-clothed police officer 
whom he had just offered 
literature concerning the 
Krishna religion. 

MK. SCOTT TOI.n the court a 
3^day, .solicitation permit 
granted the Krishna 

organization expired July 17. He 
denied a request to renew the 
permit after citizens 
complained of attempts to 
coerce them in purchasing 
Krishna literature. He noted 
that it appeared the group had 
achieved its financial goal set in 
the original permit application. 

He added he had decided 
earlier to restrict organizations 
to soliciting for 30-day periods 
within one year following public 
complaints. 

Defense attorney Gerald 
Kubinger, who represented Mr, 
Duty through support of the 
American Civil Liberties Union, 
pointed out city ordinances 
provide for permits to be issued 
for 9()-day periods, and that 
these are eligible for renewal 
for additional 90-day periods. 
He added the city's action in the 
Hare Krishna incident was 
unconstitutional against 
religious organizations. 



}■ 




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1 P.M. to 4 P.M. 



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Features 



Page A-4-The Sun-Wediwiday, April 3, 1974 



A $7,50 face Job is 
beauty brainwash 




"Mirror, mirror, on the wall 
"Who's the fairest one of all?" 
Thelirst stories I learned at my mottier's 
knee were fairy tales like "Snow White," 
"Cinderella" and "The Sleeping Beauty" in 
which the heroine was always the "fairest in 
the land." (Today we'd call them "Miss 
Americas.") The moral was clear: Beauty is 
what makes a woman disirable. 

The double standard was equally clear: a 
beauty could love a beast, a princess could 
kiss a frog, but did anyone ever take an ugly 
step-sister to lunch. 

NATURALLY, being told I was pretty 
meant more than the straight A's I got in 
school. But as 1 grew older, I learned I wasn't 
IMretty in "the right sort of way." 

The magic mirror in "Snow White" is 
positively benign compared to the magic 
camera of the fashion magazines which tell us 
that the "fairest in the land" are tall, thin, 
chiseled-cheekboned, blond models. This kind 
of brainwashing explains the following story 
which I call "Beauty and the Buck." 
Once upon a time in my quasi-liberated 
days, I went to one of those makeup centers 
where for $7.50 and all the the cosmetics they 
can sell you, you get a lesson in the "right 
way" of make up. Here's what my makeup 
artist, Mr. Freddie, prescril|ed for the 



"natural lode" I had requested. 

FIRST, a violet toner to "cover" the 
"sallowness' of my olive complexion. After 
this violet-tinted white mask had dried, it in 
turn was covered by foundation and powder in 
my new perfect peacb skin tones. 

Brown shadow and bronze goo were 
blended to "create cheekbones" while the 
shadow "sculpted" my jaw and my nose. 
Greta Garbo I may not be, but I had never 
before noticed a lack of bone structure bet- 
ween my forehead and my neck. 

Three eyeshadows "enlarged" my eyes: 
slate grey on the eyelids, off-white under the 
eyebrows and dark brown to contour the eye 
sockets. The total effect gave me the healthy 
spariile of a concentration camp surv!|*" 

WHEN I REQUESTED, that insteadTof the 
brown semi-circles "contouring" my eyes, 
their natural almond shape be emphasized, 
derisive laughter almost cracked the mirror. 
"That lo(* wentout in the '60s," he said. 

The only concession from Mr. Freddie that 
my physiogno^my wasn't a total disaster was 
that I didn't need false eyelashes. My own 
lashes were long enough. 

My mouth might have been OK, except 
that my lower lip was a teensy bit fuller than 
my upper lip. So Mr. Freddie made the 
necessary symmetrical adjustments outlining 



my lips with a brown pencil, painting than Hi 
with some orange-ton^ lipstidc, and sloshing 
on an ounce of lip gloss. Thai he added 
something shiny to highlight my temples. 

AND FINALLY, to pr(^ect my natural, 
easy-to-apply makeup, Mr. Freddie pointed 
an aerosol can of fixit at my face. That I firm- 
ly declined. 

As I left the shop, however, I kept staring at 
every mirror I passed and not to admire 
myself (as passersby assumed) . It wasn't that 
I looked bad, iHit someUiing was wrong. It was 
only when I noticed a decided improvement 
after I'd eaten off some lipstick that I realized 
what bothered me about my reflexion. 

It wasn't my face! 

I WIPED OFF the rest of my glossed 
Hollywood mouth and washed off the five 
layers of makeup (fortunately I had refused 
the fixit) . Never had my own makeiqiless face 
looked so good to me. 

I relate this e}q)erience because I consider 
it archetypal. The beauty mongers, from the 
little Mr. Freddies, to the giant cosmetics 
tycoons, all operate the same way. They 
celebrate beauty while simultaneously 
creating fairytale standards of same. Women, 
instead of living happily ever after, are more 
likely to end up with wrecked psyches and 
empty pocketbooks. 



■^ 



IIOROSCOi>C 



For 
AprU3 

to 
Aprils 



ARIES: (Mardi » to Aprfl 
U— iUM Arid AtccMlant) — 
Work from the wings instead 
of In the spotlight for best re- 
sults. Good tinae to plan a va- 
cation for later in the year. 

TAURUS: (April 21 to May 
n — Also Tfearai Ascendant) 
—Be alert for possiUe in^xr- 
taitt coitfacts made at affairs 
combining business and 
pleasure. Possibility of in- 
heritance or legacy. Use cau- 
tion in signing any papers as 
guarantor for someone else's 
debts or loan. 

GEIMINI: (Mqr 21 to Jwe 

21 — also Gemini Ascendant) 
— Prenures ease but there is 
still a lot ci action. Be patioit 
with those who are not as en- 
ergetic as you. Tightening 
your budget could alleviate 
the necessity of Jxxrowing 
money. Concentrate attention 
on loyal friends. 

CANCER: (June 21 to Jdy 

22 — Also Cancer Aacoid^t) 
— Good time to take a vaca- 
tion if appropriate. Letters or 
news firain distant relatives 
could stimulate (dans. Now's 
the time to undertake self-im- 
provement projects — charm 
course, new dothes and hair 
style. 



LEO: (July 23 to Aagmt tt 
- Also Leo Aaccndut) - Let 
your associates take the lead 
and you stay in the tack- 
9-ound. IndtUgence in emo- 
tional nostalgia brings 
pleasant moments. Don't 
^ead yourself so tbin^with 
business projects you hw^e no 
diance for, personal Uf(^ 



VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept 
22 — Also Vbio Asceadut ) — 
Be sure thfit desires are real- 
istic and attainable before 
pursuing them with false 
hopes. Discipline your temper 
«id avoid attitudes injurious 
to your health. Accepting 
friendship may be wiser than 
expecting romance. 



UBRA: (Sept 23 to Oct 22 
— Also Libra Ascendant) — 
Thinp you have been working 
on gun momentum and your 
previous effwts pay off now. 
Use your artistic and intuitive 
talents to the fullest to bring 
the greatest luck. Repairs to 
domestic equipment may be 
needed. 



SC(«PIO: (October 23 to 
Nov. 21 — Abo Scorpio As- 
cendant) — All signals are go 
for adiievement of goals now. 
Use your influence and 
magnetism to realize success. 
Use your authority wisely and 
care in decisions. Give care- 
hil, detailed instruction to 
service personnel. 



SAGirrARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 —Also Saglttarins As- 
cendant) — Gmtest coAcem 
now shouM be a realists 
budgeting of money. Use cau- 
tion in friendshi|», relying on 
the oM and bite. If yixi feel a 
raise or promotion is due you, 
put out subtle indications in 
this regard. 



CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendttit) — Realistically ap- 
proach an unplesant task and 
get it over with. Be phito- 
sophical if a previous plan 
doesn't measure up to rutlity. 
Assist an older frioid or rela- 
tive in need. Put finishing 
touches on a project. 

AQUARRJS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. U — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Some revudon of 
Icmg-range goals and methods 
is indicated. Ideas forWking 
concrete and productive the 
mystical truths and philoso- 
I^ies occur to you now. DriVe 
slowly and carefully to avoid 
accidoits. 



PISCEiS: (Feb. U to March 
28 — Also Pisces Ascoidant) 
— Resist bdng influenced into 
questi<Hiable relationships. 
Good time for self-beautifica- 
tion program. Watch budget 
carefully, being prepared for 
the possibility of an over- 
lodcMl bill coming due. Finn 
iq> (dans. 



A 



Lj ■<. 



Monday-Saturday 
10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 



'OLD fASHIOHED MiAT MARKET" 

' AU MEATS CUT TO ORDII" 

FREEZER ORDERS OUR SPECIALTY 

Forequarter - Hindquarter - Sides 

ALL USDA CHOICE CORNFED WESTERN BEEF 

Our meat cuts are shown to customers before weigh- 
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meat. 

HOMEMADE ITALIAN & COUNTRY SAUSAGE 
FRESH BROWN EXTRA LARGE EGGS 



per pound on ail cuts 
of meat WITH AD 



Chess talent is superior to genius 



^ 471 S. LYNNHAVEN RD. 

(in the Mini-Mall behind Jr. Market) 
486-2833 JOE SURACI 



If lana holds up throughout 
the . Candidates Chess 
Matches, it willvery likely be 
a triumph for genius ova- tal- 
ent. For if you look over the 
histories of the contenders, it 
becomes apparent that all 
was foreordained in the chess 
heavens. 

As a kid in knidiers, Boris 
Spasdcy was afreatfy holding 
his own against grandmas- 
ters. And even if Anatoly Kar- 
pov doesn't make it now, it's 
still hard to deny destiiqr to 
one who learns chess at four, 
is a candidate master at 11 — 
and can |day a unique game 
like the one below, where the 
initial exchange is not made 
until the 31st move and the 
enemy has to give vp because 
he's all out of moves, ideas, 
space and breath. 

Yet, the marvelous thing 




with Jc9seph BroM/n 



about diess is that you don't 
have to be great to be satisfied 
within yourself. Mediocrity 
can be overcome with talent 
and study. An early savant, P. 
Anderson Graham, believed 
that talent had more virtue in 
chess than genius. 

"... Talent is more sure of 
success than genius," he 
wrote. "The most wdlnary 
'wood-shifter,' by long study 
and analysis, can acquire a 
steady defensive style of 
wood-shifting, and if patioit 
and fairly intelligent can wori( 
up to a high standard ci play. 
... Any man of sound, clear 



After Sunset 



This entire space consists of paid advertising 



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THE SHACK — is known by the 
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c(Hnmon soise could become 
a chessplayer of the first 
rank, provided always that 
the fire and shadow of passion 
and fancy did not interfere 
with the steady, cold calculat- 
ing brain." 

Unlike other sports, chess 
presents the po^o* with at 
Imsta diance to- play against 
a master, either at open tour- 
namoits or in simultaneous 
exhibitions, though it's not 
likely he can just walk into a 
club and challenge any old 
grandmaster who's lying 
around. (Can you walk into a 
gym and ask George Fore- 
man to put on the gloves for a 
couple of rmmds? ) 

One exception was the 
legendary American chess 
champion, Frank Marshall, 
who was famed for greeting 
potzers at his club in Green- 
widi Village and oigaging 
them in games almost imme- 
diately. Like Marshall, some 
old nnastoti were boU) em- 
pathetic and instructive. 

"Chess must not Ik memo- 
rized, simply because it is not 
important enough," coun- 
seled former world champion 
Emanud Lasker. "Memory is 
too valuable to be stocked 
widi trifles. ... You shouM 
keep in miml ... only methods. 
The method is plastic. It is ^ 
plicable in every situation." 

To Lasker, chess was analo- 
gous with lUe. Ibus, he ad- 
vised his diea foUowfn to 
cut vKvs what is dead, viz., 
"artUidal theories, supported 
by -few instances and tqjhefal 
by an ezrass of human wit; 
the hatMt of idaying with inf e- 
riM- opponents; the customs 
of avokUng difficult tasks; ttie 
weakness of uncritically tak- 
ii$ over variatioiis or rules 
discovered t^ l^ers; die in- 
capacity Ua admitting mis- 
takes; in brief everything that 
leads to a standstiU or to 
..Miarchy." 

Of cmirse most potsers may 

ACIOSS 

I. r^bahind 



never get to sip the nectar m 
the company of genius, but 
they do have other rewards 
even if fitey are not neces- 
sarily in heaven. The saga- 
cious S. P. Lucas, in a letter to 
British Chess Magazine, 
noted wisely that: 

"... It is those of us in the 
lower grades who are the salt 
of the diess earth. We provide 
the money for the prizes at 
chess congresses. We are the 
ones who buy chess bodis and 
magazines. ... But our chief 
cmtribution ... is that we |x-o- 
vide a steady stream of will- 
ing victims. (And) ... where 
would the brilliant sacrifice 
be without a victim?" 

MADRID -1973 

KING'S INDIAN 

ATTACK 

RicardoCalvo 

(Spain) 
Anatoly Karpov 

(USSR) 
P-K4 



Strictiy 
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19 th Hole 

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Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 7 pm 
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Daughters want 
mate for mother 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

You've heard of ambitious moth^ns trying to 
marry off their daughters? Well, I have two 
daughters who are determined I marry again. My 
•husband, their father, died two years ago. Since 
then, I've managed to get a good job, enjoy my new 
freedom, and I do not see any reason why I should 
marry again. In fact, I'm happier single than I was 
married. I don't want to tell my daughters this 
because they think their father and I had a fairly 
good relationship which is far from the truth. 

How can I handle these two matchmakers? 
Every time I go to their homes they have cornered 
another poor soul for me. 

Single and Happy- " 
Dear Happy: 1 

Be glad your daughters are interested in your, 
future. And who knows— you just might changev 
your mind. 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My husband is a heavy drinker. He has n^ver 
been tn'utal to me or the children. However, he uses 
foul language, comes home with lipstick on his 
shirt, misses worii because he can't get out of bed, 
and embarrasses us coi^tantly. 

He claims he does not remember any of his 
wrongdoings. Is this possible? Also, can I ever hope 
he will change? 

Wits End 
Dear Wits End: 

It is very possible that your husband does not 
remember. Blackouts of memory are one sign of an 
alcoholic. 

It is impossible to have a decent family life with 
an alcoholic and your children are the innocent 
victims. Tell your husband that he has two 
^choices— seek the help he needs or get out of the 
hmise. Stress that you are willing to stick by him if 
he sedcs help immediately, yihy not contact A.A.? 
This sfdendid organization is listed in your 
telephone directory. 

Yra, you can Iwpe your husband will change. This 
will require understandii^, courage, and faith. 1 
wish you sinrcess. 



•v 



-««sta». 



UUa 



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B4 



Dear Pat and Marilyn; ' 

What can I do about my weight? I can't keep the 
pounds off. Just bef(x-e Christmas I lost fifteen 
pounds and had hoped to lose five more. Then I 
wouhi have kxdced grrat. Ekit instead of losing five 
pmmds, I've gained fifteen. I've done ttiis several 
times. Why can't I stay on a diet.? 

I>e8perate ^ 
Dear Desperate: 

Instead of allowing ^ur weight to go up and down 
like a Yo-Yo, become a determined dieter. 

ObvimBly you can diet or you wotddn't have lost 
15 pounds. Perhaps one of the weight cmbrol groups 
in your area is your answer. If this suggestion 
doesn't fit into your plam ami you prefer to do it on 
your own, plan a well balanoed, wei^t reducing 
diet and stay with it. 

Here are a few ruin which may help keep your 
det^minatim at tlie prq;»r tevel. Dm't weigh 
youndf ever^lay. This can be discoivaging. Eat 
your li^itest meal at n^t. Calcsriei takm late in 
Uk day taid to catse w^ght gain becaise m<»t of 
m are te» active at that time. Iistead <d k>ddng at 
TV aft«- dinner, try mmye new hoMy.'a sqport, or 
even a tK-isk walk around the Mode. If you take a 
st^ Iwckward, don't become disextfag^. Jiat try 
bards-. Good hidL 






»m.tmtmf0 



Gardening 



TiM Suii-W«in«day, April 3, 1974-Pagt A-6 



^# 




questions & answers about lawns & gardens 

Q. After one look at my supermarket receipt this wedt, 
I've decided to try to grt>w some of my own food. What 
vegetables are best suited tm window or terrace 
gardens? 

A. According to a{p-iculture extension service horticul- 
turists, the tomato is probably thebrat bet. One type. Tiny 
Tim, makes fine salads ana is a colorful, ornamental 
idant. There are other types rf small tomatoes such as 
Small Fry, Basket Pak, Pixie, Presto andStakeless. 

The horticulturists say cucumbers (Marketmore and 
Ashley, to name a few), peppo^. cucumbers, parsley, 
chives, radishes and herbs are all good for mini-farming. 
Salad Bowl lettuce and Ruby variety are eood eating and 
make beautiful oniamentals while they're growing. 

Basically, you need a good container (pot, box. ti'b. 
bucket), a soil mix such as Peatlite, Redeafch or Promix 
ahd proper light. Tomatoes and the bigger vegetables 
need full sunlight. Chives arid radishes will do well in 
partial shade. Soil needs watering when it's dry down to a 
quarter inch or so. Dwi't overwater— it eventually kills 
the xAani. 

You can get a complete "how to" booklet, "Mini-gardens 
for Vegetables," by sencfaig 25 cents to Superintendent of 
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, 
Washington. D.C. 20402. It gives much more detaile^r- 
infntnation for growing 18 kinds of popular vegetables mXjJBi 
small indoor-outdoor gardens. - ^1^ 

As for saving money, you'll spend a little less at the 
supermarket and maybe a lot less on mental health bills. 
Gardening is great therapy in these nervous, inflationary 
times. 

■Q. When can I plant a Fescue 311a wn? 

A. Best r^ults from seeking fescue would be in the 
months of September or October. If you need to do repair 
work on an already established lawn, then jDu can seed 
now. Tender fescue seedlings are easily killed by summer 
heat and drought. It may be best to live with the crabgrass 
this summer and put an all-out llCort into lawn 
establishment this fall. ^ i ir*\ 

Q. What can be added to a clay soil to increase 
drainage? 

A. Sand is probably the best soil additive^HjM^ use. 
Spread a two to three-inch layer of saiki over yomnsting 
soil, then thoroughly tnix the sand into the s^ The 
application of sand will definitely imfvove drainage and 
I^ant growth. 

Q. Is oleander a good flowering shrub for Virginia 
Beach? 

A. Oleander is not totally hardy in this area. That isn't 
telling you much, except that it may die if we have any 
rhore extremely cold weather. Cautim should be used 
when planting oleander since the leaves are highly 
poisonous. 

p. Ground |yy and various other, weeds are^ taking over 
th^ tlwn. What^eroicides wiu control these weed pests? 



Great vegetable gardens 
start with good planning 



Now Oiat Vii^nia Beach's 
average date <A last frost has 
passed, you should be Hnalizing 
plans for your vegetable 
garden. 

Ttie All-America vegetable 
vari^ies are among the best 
that you can select for your 
garden. Some that were named 
40 years ago are still favorites. 

But, we should now consider 
the two award winners for 1974. 
Table King is a new and unusual 
acorn squash. It |Mt)duces extra 
large, dark green fruits on 
cmnpact, bush type plants. 

TABLE KING4l9iash is an 
excellent variety for the small 
family size garden. The fruits 
iire six inches long, have 
excellent flavor and a small 
seed cavity with thick flesh. The 
smooth, hard outer shell gives 
excellent keeping quality if 
allowed to mature fully on the 
vine. 

Goldcrop is the 1974 wax snap 




EXTENSION DIWSION 

bean All-America selection. 
This new busy bean is resistant 
to common, mosaic and curly 
top viruses. It also has greater 
resistance to blossom drop 
during hot weather than most 
snap bean varieties. 

Goldcrop is an excellent home 
garden variety which produces 
slender, crisp, yellow pods 
which snap easily when bent. 
The pods are round, straight, 



smo(Ah and well-filled with 
white beans. They mature in 
about 60 to 65 days after 
idanting. 

TRY THE Aristocrat zucchini 
summer squash. Tliis was the 
only AU-Amo'ica selection for 
1973. This extra early summer 
squash produces high yields of 
attractive, dark green, gkwsy 
fruit. The fhrst fruits can be 
harvested within 48 days after 
the seeds are planted. 

The fruits of Aristocrat should 
be picked when six to eight 
inches long. They can be 
steamed or baked, or sliced raw 
to substitute fw cucumbers in 
> fresh salads. For a 
special treat pick the flowers 
early in the mmtiit^ and fry in 
thin pancake batter. 

Also, by all means plant Salad 
Bowl lettuce. This delicious leaf 
lettuce has rich green foliage 
and does not become bitter or go 
to seed in hot weather. 



A rase 
is a rase 

isa . . . 



This is Perfume Delight, 
a hybrid tea with per- 
fectly formed, clear 
pinli petals, it has a ricli 
tea fragrance. It was 
named an All-America 
Rose Selection for 1974 
and is expected to 
become a favorite of rose 
gardeners. 



WesleVan's greenhouse to 

show 'fmits' of education j^ and trivia for the gardener 




U 



ik^ 



A. There are two chemicals which should control most 
of the peroinial weeds. Itiese are Silvex and Dicamba. 

Hotline will be gfad to answer your questioris about lawns and 
gardens. Send your questions to HoMne, Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rotemont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 

Daffodils are blooming 
for Gloucester show 



A see-through structure made 
of fiberglass will be going up 
sometime soon on the campus of 
Virginia Wesleyan Collie. 

The structure is a planned 
full-scale greenhouse to be used 
by Dr. Dennis Govoni, biology- 
botany teacher, and his 
students to grow living 
materials and conduct plant 
experiments. 

The greenhousehas long been 
a dream of Dr. Govoni's. Plans 
for it turned to reality when the 
Women of Wesleyan contributed 
more than $13,500 towards the 
greenhouse construction. 

THE WOMEN raised the 
money through sponsorship of 
their annual flea market, with 
proceeds used for special 
Virginia Wesleyan projects. 

Dr. Govoni hc^s to have the 
fiberglass house completed by 
the 'fall term. It will coiidiin 
1,300 square feet of space., Its 
fiberglass construction was 
suggested by the Virginia 
Experimental Farm, which has 
helped Dr. Govoni with 
construction planning. 

The botany teacher has been 
trying to grow the plants he 
needs in his office at the college. 
Five sets of lighted shelves 



covered with plants are his 
current "greenhouse." Things 
are a wee bit cramped. Dr. 
Govoni admits. , 

"I'm really excited about it," 
Ik said of the greenhouse [rians. 
"I just can't over-emphasize the 
need for this greenhouse as we 
develop new courses in biology 
and botany and expand our 
present c^erings." 

Dr. Govoni is already looking 
ahead to the time when he and 
his students can begin using the 
greenhouse for all their 
experiments. He plans to grow 
living materials, collect 
materials at different times of 
the year and store them year- 
round. 

HE ALSO hopes to be aUe to 
use the house to store the 
materials needed for several 
courses,, including aquatic 
biology, plant morphology, 
genetics, plant taxonomy, 
general botany, microtechnique 
and plant anatomy. 

Students will be able to use 
the greenhouse to conduct their 
own independent research 
projects. The greenhouse 
environment will enable them 
to grow plants all year round, no 
matter what the weather. 



The daffodils are bloinning 
fw the 40th annual daffodil 
dww of the Garden Club of 
Virginia in Gloucester. 

Tlie show will be Saturday 
and Sunday in the Gloucester 
High School gymnasium. 
Saturday's hours are 3 to 6 p.m. 
and Sunday's hours are noon to 
5 p.m. 

This year, as in previous 
years, the event is expected to 
attract growers, exhibitors and 
visitors from all over Virginia. 

The theme c& this year's show 
is "Yesterday, Today and 
Tomorrow." A special highlight 
will be a non^competitive 
exhibit of daffodils by William 
G. Pannill, honwary member of 
the Garden Study Club of 
Martinsville and an amateur 
daffodil culturist. 

GUxicester is recognized as 



the daffodil ca|Htal of Virginia 
and the center of the daffodil 
industry. The flowers started 
blooming in early February and 
by March the city was full (rf 
fields of yellow blooms. 



STUDENT TAPPED 

Karen Sloan of Virginia 
Beach has been tapped for 
membership in the senior 
women's honorary leadership 
society at Westminster College. 

Miss Sloan, a speech major at 
the New Wilmington, Pa. 
college, has been appointed 
resident director of an 
upperclass women's house for 
the 1974-75 academic year. 



NOW^- 



DORMANT OIL SPRAYS 

Cm pKvent many iniects (mitei, icdes, 4>hkb uid meily ba|L) from 
multiplying in the ipiing and mmmer of 1974. 

CALL 420-1283 NOW 

TO HAVE AZALEA, CAMELLIA, ARBORVITAE, BOXWOOD, 
JAPANESE HOLLY, PYRACANTHA, AND OUNESE HOLLY 
SPRAYED WITH DORMANT (HL. 

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Sometime in the future, Dr. 
Govoni also hopes to plant a 
Virginia "wildriower garden" 
on the campus using the 
greenhouse to start the plants. 

"And, of course," Dr. Govmi 
chuckled, "the greenhouse will 
be one of those places where 
people can come and see the 
growing 'fruits' of a college 
education." 



Remember to prune those 
spring flowering shrubs as soon 
as the blossoms have faded. 
Don't cut off the foliage of your 
spring flowering bulbs. 

This foliage produced the food 
that will be used f«- growth next 
spring. 

It's time to plant com, say the 
trivia experts, when the leaves 
on the white oak have grown to 
the size of a squirrel's ear. 

Wonder when to water? For 



hanging plants, just let a few ice 
cubes slowly melt into the soil. 

This way, there's no watering 
mess. 
House plants like misty 



moisture, especially in dry 
months. Mist house plants daily 
to keep them healthy and 
happy. Use a plastic mist bottle 
or, if you want to be fancy, a 
cordless electric sprayer. 







PRESENTING 



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SIDELINES 

By 

John^ 
Baimon 

Sports Editor 



Born Phillie fan 
lives with iosing 

After playing brilliantly all season, the 
Philadelphia '76ers were betrayed by their owner 
last week. With ineptness being their major ploy, 
the '76ers had moved into a challenging position in 
the "Walton Bowl," posting a last place NBA East 
record of 23-57. 

Owner Irv Kosloff failed to capitalize on the one 
thing his team does best — lose games. The 
Philadelphia owner called heads in the coin flip 
with Portland (last place finisher in the West) for 
the first choice in the NBA draft. Of course, the coin 
came up tails. 

Losing has become synonymous with the "City 
of Brotherly Love". In fact, a move ought to be 
made to add a middle name to the city's calling, 
becoming Philadelphia Losing, Pa. ^ 

FOR ONE inglorious year, the '76ers were the 
best team in pro basketball, winning more games 
than any club in NBA history and taking the league 
title. Abhorred at such a mistake, the '76er 
management quickly moved to right the situation, 
trading an NBA title to the Los Angelos Lako-s 
(Wilt Chamberlain) and making the Chicago Bulls 
a constant playoff contender (Chet Walker). A few 
more trades put the '76ers back in their rightful 
residence in the cellar. 

The Eagles had the audacity to win the NFL title 
in 1960. Repenting for their sin against the city, the 
Eagles have spent the years, following their title, 
supporting the NFL structure from the bottom. 

Despite their excellent qualifications, the 
Eagles and the '76ers must take a backseat to the 
granddaddy of all Philadelphia losers — the 
Phillies. The history of the Phillies in the National 
League makes the Squires' stay in Virginia read 
like an overwhelming success story. 

There is something different about a childhood 
spent growing up in Philadelphia and rooting for 
the Phillies. While kids in other parts of the country 
are reveling in the exploits of a Rocky Cola vi to or a 
Mickey Mantle, the heroes to heap worship upon for 
a Phillie fan bore such names as Joe Koppe and 
Bobby Del Greco. 

FOR THE UNITIATED, Koppe was a shortstop 
of questionable major league credentials, who 
earned a young boy's undying affection with a 5 for 
5 perfwmance one night. Before his very eyes, 
egged on by Koppe's hitting, the mighty San 
Francjbctfteiants fell to the Phillies at Connie Mack 
Stadium. 

Del ^reco, possesor of even more limited 
ability^ earned hero status simply for is ability to 
makeihe routine play \odk. spectacular and his 
colorftil name. The two demagogues of a young 
boy's world later faded into obscurity with the 
California Angels and the Kansas City Athletics, 
respectively. But until their names could no longer 
be found even through the closest scrutiny of the 
Sporting News, the allegiance lived on. 

Memories of success on the bseball diamond are 
f(M«ign to a Phillie fan. His first trip to see his 
heroes perform live was typical. Robin Roberts, a 
marvelous talent who had the misfortune to spend 
the bulk of his career pitching for a miserable club, 
pitched brilliantly awi even hit a home run. The 
n)iUies lost 2-1. 

One year in a lifetime of rooting for the Phillies 
stands wit for its uniqueness. In 1964, the Phillies 
astounded the sports world bv actuallv 
challenging for the National League pennant. 

THEY COULD do no wrong. Johnny Callison 

won numerous games with clutch base hits and 

captured an AU-Star game for the Nationals with an 

extra-innii^ pinch-hit home run. Jim Bunning 

' hurled a perfect game against the Mets. 

In August, the Phillies hardly lost a game,^ 
pulling away from the pack. By September, the 
clinching (rf the pennant seemed a mere math- 
matical formality. Riding the crest of a winning 
streak, Philadelphia owned a six-and-a-half game- 
lead with only 12 games remaining in the season. 

Reality came crashing into the fantasy world. 
The Phillies dropped ten straight games and were 
edged by St. Louis by one game for the title. The 
Cardinals amazing triumph made quite a 
few peo{de happy in St. Louis, but for at 
least one Philadelphia fan the world had come 
to a halt. 

The Phillies have won two pennants in the 20th 
caitury — in 1925 and again in mm. The 25-year 
cycle has almost elapsed, so writing off this year 
before it even starts simply say the words nobody is 
entitled to mwe than a PhilUe fan, "Wait til next 
year." 

PA golfers open 
season with win 



S ports 



Page A-6-The Sun-Wednwday, April 3, 1974 



PREVIEW 



Defending state champion 
PrnicesB Anne opened their tide 
defense with a non-league 
ntatch victory Thursday at Red 
Wing ^If course. 

Coadi Leo Anthony's charges 
dMwed that tiie year lay-off has 
nM affected tlwir game. The 
^vattov posted a winning 
lean total of 310 to easify 
(Wtdtotance Uie fleld. aty riral 
Bayride was a distant second SO 
•mkfli tadi witti a team total 
cf M. Swtfaeastem District 
re|»«ientative Indian Ri^r 
Mrtri Mrd wiUi a team total 
d m. N«rf<A CathoUc piat^ 
bM ta At q^Miran^lar match 
with a tiMi total of »4. 

nt Uta^ stretched the 
CkvtfinaAMtra «tag to as 
^tffwiiH ttoae 




District golf s^istm starts nursttoy 






ByJOHNBANNON 

Sports Editor 

The weather {4ayed a major itiflinnice on Beach 
high school sports this past week. Four tennis 
matches and two track meets headed the casuality 
list. 

Barring a repeat of last week's weather, a busy 
schedule is in store for local athletes this week. 

GoH 

The Eastern District golf season gets underway 
Thursday. Two time defending state champion 
Princess Anne must rate as the odds on favorite to 
repeat as titlist again. The Cavalier^ led by Coach 
Leo Anthony, opened their 1974 season last week 
with easy triumphs over Bayside, Indian River and 
Norfolk Catholic in a quadrangular match. 

Princess Anne will enter district competition with 
an unbeaten string, which spans over three 
seasons. To add fuel to the Cavalier title fire, in- 
dividual state champion Richard Tucker returns 
for another season. Tucker showed he had lost none 
of last year's championship form, opening with a 
two-over par 74 at Red Wing last Thursday. 

Keimpsville, who narrowly missed upsetting the 
Cavaliers in last year's Eastern Regional Tour- 
nament, should again provide a strong challenge to 
Princess Anne supremacy, 

This week's schedule finds Norview and Lake 
Taylor playing Kellam at Red Wing; Bayside and 
Cox travelling to Ocean View to play Maury, 
Granby and Bodier T. Washington; while First 
Colonial hosts Kempsville and Princess Anne at 
Oceana. 



Track 



.If ^ 

City harriers should have a busy day today with 
five dual meets on the schedule. Maury visits 
Princess Anne; Baysi(te travels to Lake Taylor;. 
Backer T. Washington hosts Kemj^ville; Cox is at 
Kellam; and Granby travels to First Colonial. 

Bayside and Kellam are the only city teams with 
dual meet experience under their belts so far this 
season. The two expected powers of the mitdoor 
Eastern District track and field competition 
squared off last week at Bayside. The Marlins came 
away with a hard-earned 71-60 win over this year's 
indoor champions. 

Maury and Princess Anne will both be making 
their first appearance on the outdoor circuit this 
season. The same will hold true for Lake Taylor. 
The Titans will have to contend with Bayside's 
brilliant trio of Jerry Mosely, Roscoe Coles and 
Eric Chapman. The three Marlins accounted for six 
individual wins in last week's match against 
Kellam. 

Booker T. Washii^ton will have one advantage 
when they face Kempsville this afternoon. The 
Bookers have already been out of the gate once, 
while the Chiefs willbe making their outdoor debut. 
The Boc^ers initial performance of the season was 
a disaster, being bombed by Granby 8542. Kemp- 
sville's Matt Slavish is the Chief's big gun. Stavish, 
Eastern District cross-country champion, is a 
threat in every long distance race he enters. 

Cox, debuting against Kellam, will have to 
contend with the Knights strength in the field 
events. Kellam took every field event except the 
long jump in last week's meet against Bayside. Ken 



Rutledge was the Knight's star placing first in the 
shot and the discus. 

First Colonial will be making their opening 
outdoor performance against a Granby team that is 
fresh off their crushing win over Booker T. 
Washington. Perhaps the Patriots best performer, 
is sophomore Jerry Ohnaizer. Assistant Coach^ 
Frank Webster figures Ohnaizer as a sure shot to* 
break the school shot put record before graduating. 

Tennis 

Tennis will take over the local sports scene 
Friday with five matches scheduled. Kellam hosts 
Maury; Princess Anne travels to Bayside; Kemp- 
sville is at Cox ; and First Colonial travels to Booker 
T. Washington to complete the week's tennis 
schedule. 

Kellam has a tough assignment, facing Maury. 
The Commodores are the defending Eastern 
District champions and are undefeated on the year. 
In their only action last week, the Knights received 
an 8-1 drubbing at the hands of Kempsville to drop 
their seasonal mark to the .500 level. 

Princess Anne is off to a quick start this season, 
taking their opening two matches in strong fashion. 
Bayside dropped their only decision so far this 
year, suffering an 8-1 battering against Lake 
Taylor. 

Kempsville rebounded from an early loss to First 
Colonial with an easy 8-1 triump over Kellam. Cox 
was forced to postpone their only match last week 
and are 0-1 on the year. 

First Colonial is undefeated thus far, edging 
Kempsville 5-4 in their only test during the young 
season. 



Athlete of i 



the Week 



Harrison wins 



I 



■X 




Kempsville continues hot streak 



Roscoe 



Coles 



i I I I" ■ 



Bayside 



Roscoe Coles has been selected as Virginia 

I Beach high school athlete of the week. Coles 

I was selected for iYye award on the strength of 

I his performance in Bayside's 71-60 dual track 

meet victory over Kellam last week. 

The Marlin harrier competed in five events, 
I during the competition. The speedy Coles took 
I first place honors in the long jump and the 440. 
I To complete his excellent performance^ Coles 
I finished a narrowly beaten second in the 100- 
I yard dash to teammate Jerry Mosely, posting 
I a time of 10.0 seconds. 

An outstanding athlete will be chosen by The 
I Sun each we^ during the high schocd sfHlng 
I season. 



Bayside scores 
key track win 

over Kellam 



i 



I 



Friday 

Kempsville 4 IV)j|rview 2 

Two-time defending state champion 
Kempsville continued their fast start with 
their second road victory and third 
straight win to start the season with a 4-2 
win over Norview. 

The Chiefs bunched all their scoring in 
the third inning, banging Norview pitching 
for lour. ruqs. Pitcher Bobby Harrison 
helped his own cause with a two-run single. 
Outfielder Mark O'Hara continued his hot 
firing hitting, driving home two third 
inning runs with a single. O'Hara has 
knocked home five runs in the Chiefs first 
three contests. ' 

Harrison became the third straight 
Kempsville pitcher to go the distance in 
gaining his first win of the seasort. The 
Pilots nicked Harrison for six hits, scoring 
single runs in the first and the third. In 21 
innings of pitching so far this season. Chief 
hurlers have limited opposing batters to 
just eight hits and two earned runs. 

Bayside at Princess Anneppd. rain 

Princess Anne's season q>ener was a 
washout when rain forced cancellation. 
The game has been rescheduled fw 
Monday. Tuesday Princes Anne was at 
First Cdonial. 

Tltursday 

Granby 6 Bayside 3 

Bayside was coasting to what seemed to 
be an easy victory. The Marlins had pipked 
up single tallies in each of the first 
three frames to move to ah early lead. 

Bayside ace southpaw Tom Wiesner set 
down the Comet hitters efforUessly 




through the first four innings, giving the 
MarUns a 3-0 l#ad. Fdlowing his early 
season strategy. Coach Terry Morton 
pulled Wiesner after the senior retired the 
Comets in the fourth. ■ 

Reliever Marty Moore failed to hold the 
lead. Moore was nicked for a single run in 
the fifth inning before the rOof caved in 
during the sixth. The Comets scored a 
game-clinching five rims on just one hit in 
their half of the frame. Moore lost the 
strikezone walking four batters, forcing in 
a run. The defense behind Moore 
committed a pair of miscues. A single and 
a sacrifice fly completed the damaging 
inning. 

It was the second poor outing for Moore. 
The senior, expected to be a mainstay on 
the Marlin pitching corps, has been 
touched for 12 runs in just seven innings of 
work. The Marlins are now 6-2 on the 
season and ha ve committed eight errors in 
their first 14 innings. 

Kella m 7 Barry Robinson 3 

Kellam won their second straight to 
start the season with a 7-3 triumph over 
Barry Robinson. Rich Bloxcmt picked up 
his first win of the seascm woiting four 
innii^ in relief of starter Ed Mayo. 



The Knights put the game out d reach 
with some heavy hitting in the middle 
innings. Kellam sewed two in the third, 
three in the fourth and closed out their 
scoring with a two-run outburst in the fifth. 
The Knights banged out 12 hits in route to 
the victory. It was the second straight good 
hitting performance for Coach Don 
Peccia's charges. The Knights have 
scored 15 runs and banged out 21 hits in 
their first 14 innings. 

Pitcher Joe Kwansy came on in the final 
inning to save the decision for Bloxom. 
Kwansy has now hurled eight innings of 
scoreless ball on the season. ,, 

FirstColoniaieCoxO 



Darell Doss became the fourth Beach 
pitcher to tnirl a one-hitter so far this 
season as he hurled the Patricks to a &€ 
win in the season opener for both teams. 

The only Falcon hit came on a high fly to 
left center which fell safely between the 
outstretched grasps of two Patriot 
outfielders. 

Cox's Brad Bakelaar had dueled alm(»t 
evenly with Doss through the first four 
innings. The only da°mage the Patriots 
inflicted was a single run ip the third 
inning. A walk, a sacrifice, an 
unsuccessful fielders choice and a 
sacrifice fly gave the Patriots their first 
run. 

First Colonial gave Doss some^btyathing 
room with a four-run outlHirw in the 
bottom of the fifth. Senior catcher Chris 
Swecker keyed the game-clinching rally 
with a two-run triple. SweCJ^er had an 
excellent day at the plate going 2 f(H- 4. 

The Patriots closed out the scoring with 
a single run in the sixth. 

Tuesday, Cox hosted Kempsville. 



Ptftadtng sttt* individual 
^MiyiM Ktehard Tucker 

fm m^ 1^ divaK- W^ 
^M tte ftatek't hMVMt 



indivi^al score, firing a two- 
over par 74. 

Sports club's 
golf outing 

Hie Virginia Beach Sports 
Chib's sprii^ ^If euti% will be 
April 23. Program dtfirman 
Levon Dutm has aimounced the 
club's annual affair will be at 
the Little Creek Naval 
Amphibious Base's Eagle 
Hav«) Course. 

tlie outing is open to all 
metnben of the club and their 
gueb. 

Upcoming sports club 
proptims iiKdude a fibn on tiie 
1?73 Masters tttt Tuesday. On 
Apil U. the fettaai^^iiritw 
mm be heaiy» light be ' 
wntewter Dmm»»AMcIi. 



An (dd hand and a newcomer 
led Bayside to an important 
season-opening 71-60 oubloor 
h-ack and field victory over 
Kdlam Mar. 27 at Bayside. 

Senior Roscoe Coles was the 
Marlins old hand. The svnft 
Cotes placxd first in the long 
jump and the 440; Pnmiising 
freshman Jmy Midy blazed 
home first in the 100-yard dash 
and the 220. The four victories 
keyed Bayside's win. 

The opening <kial meet of the 
outdocr seascx) was important 
to both participants. Kellam, 
this year's indoor Eastern 
District track and field 
champion, and Bayside are 
expected to be the class of the 
league during the outdoor 
season. Coles, who played 
basketiball for Bayside this 
season, did not compete during 
ttw indoor season. 

MOSELY DELIVERED the 

biggest surprise of the 
competition. The Marlin 
freshman tied Cedes* school 
record with a 9.9 performance 
in the 100-yard dash. Makii^ 
Mosely's performance even 
more remarkable, was the fact 
that it is so ^rly in the sea«n 
and was rtn a^imt the wind. 
Otes fintahed a dose ieconl 
to MoKty in the 100-yard dash, 
posting an exceltent time of 
10.0. Bayside Coach Len 
QmrnmoeA esipscto Oe bad-to- 
hewl cm^^ttaB b^weM Ceta 
and M^Iy tUtwglMUt Ike 

JMJfU lo lOWW w6B liSlliMi 



times. "Mosely might be able to 
do 9.5 or 9.6 before the end of the 
seasmi," contends Greenwood. 
"He's going to be a good one." 

Cotes breezed to his 440 
victory in 50.6 seconds. Mosely 
outclassed the 220 fteld with a 
time of 23.2 seconds. 

Koi Rutledge delivered two 
neki victories to Kellam. An 
offoisive tacttl^ the Ki^^ 
football team last fall, he took 
ttie shot put competition with a 
heave of 51 feet 10 inches. 
Rutledge foOowed up his shot 
put triumph with a first in ttw 
discus with a throw (tf 135 feet 11 
inches. 

Bayside's fine long distance 
runner Eric Chapman was abo 
a dual winno" at the me^ 
Chapman placed first in the 880 
with a time d 2:04.8. In the mile 
run. Chapman pulled away 
fnmi Ms Kdlam pursiwrs at the 
stert of the final lap and breezed 
to an easy triimiph. His time 
wu 4:33.8. 

Kellam dominated tiw fi^ 
evrats during the ciMnpetitioo. 
Coupted with lUitledgCs wins In 
the shot and &e discus, ttie 
Knights nnished first in the 
lrq>te Jump, hi^ Jump and the 
ptrie vault 0^ Cotes' lo^ 
^unp wta) prevailed Kdlam 
f run taUi^ a dean s««^ of Uie 
fidd evffilB. 

PrineoB kmm, Kempsvilte, 
First Coteoial and Cox w«* 
achedided to make Oiar outdow 
ddMt iMt week, but incloneirt 
weaOa- fsrwd p o st po ne m e a t 
ofthadMl ^ 




BAYSIDE'S ROSCOE Coles (left) and 
teammate Jerry Rta^ (r^t) Aid in the 
•<itr«leli ^ the lM-:^rl dash, dnrhig d«al meet 
a^imt Kellam at Bayside. Mt^ely oatlean^ 



rMe<i at the flnfoh to ta&e flfst pteee, tyhig 
roli><i' !;chool record In the process with a tine 
<rf n.9 <!<>cnndg. {San phtrto by John Banmrn) 



mm 



The Sun-Wediwsday. April 3, 1974-|Mfl« A-7 



PREVIEW 



Beach teams busy if sun shines 



r 

- • 
• 
I 
I 
I 
I 

1 
I 



ByJOHNBANNON 
SfNN^ Editor 

Baseball has gotten off to a slow start on the 
local front. Due to inclement weather, l£^t wedc's 
busy schedule shrunk to just four games. If the 
leather cooperates, Beach baseball tfeams shwild 
log a lot of playing time this v/egk with 10 games on 
tap. 

There is diversity in Uie records posted by the 
six Beach teams as the baseball season enters its 
third week. Three Beach squads are still un- 
defeated. Two local teams have yet to break into 
the win column, and Princess Anne has not played a 
regular season game. 

This week's games mark the final chance for 
tune-ups before the Eastern District season starts 
for real on April 11. 

BAYSIDE 

Bayside is one of the two local schools that have 
yet to track down that elusive first win. The 
Marlins' record dropped to 0-2 last week, losing a 6- 
3 decision to Granby. 

Bayside will have three chances to break their 
losing streak this week. The Marlins travel to Lake 
Taylor this afternoon, host First Colonial on Friday 
and close out their week's work with a, game at 
Princess Anne Monday. 

The Marlins have gotten off to a poor start at the 
plate. In 14 innings, Bayside has managed only 
three runs on five hits. Opposing pitchers have held 
Bayside scoreless in 11 of the innings over that 
stretch. 

Defense has been another sturhbling block for 
the slow starting Marlins. Bayside's fielders have 
committed four errors in each of their first two 
games. The sloppy fielding led directly to big in- 



nings, which took the Marlins out of both coot^ts. 

On the Iwi^ter side, ace pitcher Tom Wieai«r 
was impressive in his first outing <rf the spring. The 
senior smithpaw held Granby scoreless, during the 
four innings he worked. 

"The kids still believe in thenttelves," main- 
tains first yrair Coach Terry Jlbrton. "We'll be 
ready by the time the distFict seasm opens." 
COX 

Cox failed to hit in their season opener against 
First Colonial. The Falcois were limited to one hit 
and shutout by Patriot jsophomwe Darrell Doss, 
losing 6-0. 

Brad Bakelaar showed a good fastball, during 
his starting assignment against Fir^t Colonial. 
However, his control and some faulty Falcon 
fielding proved fatal. 

This week Cox plays twice. Friday, the Falcons 
travel to Princess Anne, while on Tu^day Cox 
hosts Kellam. 

The Falcons are coming off a 3-12 season. Coach 
Tom Fisher is starting a youthful line-up. When the 
younger players begin to gain the necessary game 
experience, their performance should begin to 
improve. 

FIRST COLONIAL 

Coach Ted Phelps entered the 1974 baseball 
season worried about the Patriot pitching staff. If 
Doss' performance last Thursday against Cox is 
any indication, the worry was needless. "Hie 
sophomore southpaw was overpowering, hurling a 
one-hit shutout to get First Colonial off on the right 
foot. 

First Colonial will take to the diamond three 
times this week. Thursday and Friday, the Patriots 



are on the road against Kempsville and Baysicte, 
respectively. Mon^y, the I^Mots i«turn h<Hne to 
play Granby. . ,.,. , 

As «(pected, senior catchelr Chris Swecker has 
assumed the offensive leadership role. Swedcer 
knodced in two key runs against C<« with a base- 
clearing triple on his way to a 2 for 4 performance. 

The Patriots will not have an easy time with this 
weed's schedule. Baysicte is the only opponent that 
has lost a game this season. 

KELLAM 

Kellam has gotten out of the gate quickly. The 
Knights have romped to two easy victories against 
Eastern Academy and Barry R(^inson to enter the 
third week of the season undefeated. 

Hitting has been the main force propelling the 
Knights in the early going. Led by Scott Layden and 
Tom Morrissey, Kellam is averaging 7.5 runs a 
contest and have banged out 21 hits in their first two 
games. Kellam has scored in seven (A their first 14 
inning. 

The Knights are scheduled to play three times 
this week. Thursday, Kellam travels to Eastern 
Academy for a rematch. The Knights won the first 
time around 8-0. Friday, Kellam faces their stiffest 
test of the young season, when they travel to 
Kempsville. Kellam's torrid hitting streak will be 
given a severe test by the talented Chief pitching 
staff. Kellam closes out their schedule with a 
Tuesday game at Cox. The two Beach squads 
should provide the Knights with the stiffest 
challenge of the^young season. 

Pitcher Joe Kwansy has been the star of the 
Kellam pitching staff so far. The sen|s};; hi^,hurted" 
eight scoreless innings during two mound ap- 
pearances. 



KEMPSVILLE 

The two-time defending state champion Chiefs 
continued th^ir fine early season play last week, 
def^ting Norview 4-2. "The win boosted Kemps- 
ville's record to 3-0. 

Coach Ray Barlow has gotten excellent pitching 
from three different starters, in taking the first 
three games. Jimmy Moore, Frank Welch and 
Bobby Harrison all turned in route-going per- 
formances for the Chiefs. Harrison was the latest 
Chief victor, going seven innings against Norview. 

Over 21 innings, Kempsville's pitchers have 
limited of^sing hitters to just eight hits and have 
been touched for only two earned runs. The deep 
Chief staff should pose problems to all of Kemps- 
ville's opponents this season. 

Hitting is not off to as good a start as the pitch- 
ing. The Chiefs have registered onl^ nine hits 
over their last 14 innings. Still, Kempsville is 
averaging 5.3 runs a game. 

In the final week before the Chief's start to defend 

their Eastern District crown, they will play three 

times. The Chiefs are at home all week with games 

Vagainst First Colonial on Thursday, Kellam on 

Friday and Booker T. Washington Monday. 

PRINCESS ANNE 

Prineess Anne is still trying to play their first 
game. The Cavaliers were scheduled to open their 
1974 season Friday against Bayside, but the rain 
had other ideas. 

The Cavaliers will try again this week with two 
games on tap. Princess Anne will host Cox on 
Friday and Bayside on Monday. The Cavaliers 
have a young team, and the lack of playing time 
could prove to be a liability with the district season 
fast approaching. ^^ 



Chief sand Princess Anne 
register net triumphs 



Weather played a major role 

in last week's tennis action. 

.Rain forced the po6tponment (rf 

.;four matches Friday. First 

Colonial at Granby, Kellam at 



Princess Anne, Kempsville at 
Lake Taylor and Bayside at Cox 
were the casualties. Make-up 
date for the cancelted matches 
is May, 7. 



Sports Record' 



Thb Week 

WEDNESDAY 

Trick — Maury «» Princess Anne 

Bayside at Lake Taylor 

Kennpsvtile at Booker T. Washington 

Cox at Kellam 

Granby at First Colonial 
Bastball — Bayside at Lake Taylor 

THURSDAY 

OoH — Norview, Lake Taylor and Kellam 
at Red Wing 

Bayside, Cox, Granby, Booker T. 
Wastiington and Maury at Ocean View 

Kempsville, Princess Anne and First 
Colonial at Oceana 
Baieball — First Colonial at Kempsville 

Kellam at Eastern Academy 

FRIDAY 

Tennis — Maury at Kellam 
Princess Anne at Bayside 

Kempsville at Cox 

First Colonial at Booker T. 

Waitiington 

Baiaball — First Colonial at Bayside 
Cox at Princess Anne 
Kellam at Kempsville 

Track — Colonial Relays at Williamsburg 

SATURDAY 

Track — Colenial Relays at Williamsburg 

MONDAY 

BasabMI — Booker T. Washington at 
Kempsville 

Granby at First Colonial 

Bayside at Princess Anne 

TUESDAY 
Bawbril — Kellam at Cox 

last Wsek 

'. Basabtfl — Kempsville 4 Norview 7 

Bayside at Princess Anne ppd. rain 

First Cotonlai 4 Cox 

Kellam 7 Barry Robinson 3 

Granby « Bayside 3 
Tannb — Princess Anne 7 Norfolk Cathode 
} 

Kempsville S Kellam 1 
Track — Bayside 71 Kellam W 

Kempsville at Princess Araie ppd. 

First Colonial at Cox ppd. 
0«l> — Princess Anne 310, Bayside 3*9, 
Indian River 380 and Norfolk Catholic 384 



Kempsville IKaHam I 

Singles — O'Hara (Kemp) d. Richardson, 
6 0, 6 0; 

Brandt (Kemp) d. Stephens, t-1, 62; 

Miller (Kemp) d. Johnson S-7, 6-4,7-6; 

RIonted d. Allemand, 6-1, 6-4; 

Hamll (Kemp) d. Barclay, 61, 60; 

Minschke (Kemp) d, Venner, 6-1, 63. 
Doubles — O'Hara Brandt (Kemp) d. 
Johnson Stephens, 6-3, i■^:. 

Richardson Allemand (Kel) d. 
RIonted-Polatty, 6-3, 5-7. 6-1; 

Hamill Minschke (Kemp) d. Barclay. 
Venner, 7 5, 6-3. 

Track 

■aysMe 71 Kellam 60 

High hurdles — Broekett (K), 15.5; 

ItO — Mosely (B), «.9; 

Mile — Chapman (B), 4:33.8 

440 — Coles (ff), 50.6; 

Intermediate iwrdles — Lockett (B), 42,8; 

880 — Chapman (B), 2:04.8 

JJO — Mosely (B). 23.2; 

Two-mile — Kays (B), 10:19.»; 

Mile rel^ — Kellam (White, Campell, 

Johnson, Godfrey), 3:40.5; 

Shot put — Rutledge (K), 51' 

Discus — Rutledge (K). 135' 

Long lump,— Coles (B), 22' 0" 
Triple lump — Henry (K), 42' 10' 3" 
Pole Vauti — Doxey (B), 11'6"! 
High lump — Conley (K), 5' 10". 



Two Beach schools did 
manage to get onto the courts 
March 26. Princess Anne 
defeated Norfolk Catholic 7-2. 
and Kempsville routed Kellam 
8-1. 

THE CAVAIJERS clinched 
their win with a strong singles 
performance, taking five of the 
six matches. Princess Anne's 
Tom Callen and Rich Banta 
were particularly impressive. 
Callen tot* his singles test in 
straight sets 6-1, 6-2. Banta was 
also a straight set victor with an 
easy 6-2. 6-0 performance. 

Kempsville turned the tables 
on Kellam. The Chiefs were 
coming off a narrow loss to 
First Colonial, while Kellam 
was fresh from an S-t win over 
Cox. 

The Chiefs won all six singles 
matches. Only one Knight failed 
to fall in straight sets. 



10" 

11" 



BasebaH 



Kempsville 084 800 0—4 i 1 

Norview 101 080 8-2 6 2 

Harrison and Crain; Bruce and Hilliard. 
vyU^Harrison (1-0). L — Bruce (0-1) 

Granby 888 815 8 — 6 3 8 

Bayside 111 808 8—3 4 4 

woodhouse and Miller. Wiesner, Moore (5) 

«id Lohman. 

W - ^wdhoose (10). L - Moore (0 2) 

Barry-Roblnson 000 100 0—3 6 1 
Kellam 002 320 x — 7 12 1 

Cox. Hill (5) and Vaughn. AAayo, Bloxom 
(3), Kwansy (7) and Layden. 
W — Bloxom (1-0). L —Cox (0-1). 

Cox 800 888 8—8 I I 

First Colonial 801 041 x— t « I 

Bakelaar and Kochler; C3oss and Swecker. 
W— Doss (1-0). L -I IBakelaar (0-1) 



Tannb 



PrlncMSAnneT 
Norfolk Cathollel 

I — Woehl (NO d. Hun*r, 4 3, «; 
Callen (PA) d. Kuslak, 6-1, 6 2; 
Self <PA> d. Cash^. 40, 6 3; 
Banta (l>A) d. Ellis, 62, 60; 
Carlln (PA) d- Hendry, 6-3, 6 2; 
a».' Kemar (PA) d. Primm, 61, 6-1. 
^'.'Double*- WoeW - Kuslak (NO d. Hunler 
>* Callen,' 8,3, 1-4, 6 2; 

f Salt Banta (PA) d. Cash'O-Vletti, 6 1, » 

S^' CoorlBW-Hatcher (PA) d. Hendy 
' — •'prImm. 4-I, 4.0, • 



-.1* * 



m.' 



VIRGINIA 
BEACH 
ENGRAVING & 
TROPHY CO. 

Trophies. Plaques. Awndi 

Midline engnvim 
^ Cnig A. Montfomary, 
Pi««ident ^ 
. 4968 HoHandRd. Suite C 
499^41. 







Pva 



»■— 

Cm* 



il^ Wa Provide It 



m'^ 



v.. 
#». 

ff- 



MONEY 






Whm you «« disabled due to 
accident or sicknen. 

i Call: 625-3604 

\ LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

{j^9ftB ffbiiflli OOaBBBttttt tt«t»9» tH9gt89frB9tMB 8 8a 




BOAT 

OWNER 

READ 

THIS! 




iAZZ BAND CONCERT 

htaoMi Anne H. S. Aaditoriam - April 10 • 8 PJi. 

'•KtBmdiAreBm:k"Featurb^ 

MMMi Am* H. S. StifB Bod - Kdtan a S. S<v Bnd 

■^ilteJt.iLS.StBfeB8iiii Haying Pop ml Jttz 

IkkMatikMRPiflrfbr'netetSS.OO-AdaltSIJO • 



c riiMFDai wnMF 



WE HAVE A NEW POLICY DE- 
SGNED FOR THE OWNERS 
OF OUTBOARDS, INBOARDS, 
SAILBOATS AND INWARD/ 
OUTBOARDS, 25 FEET OR 
UNDER.a>VERAGElNCLUDES; 

YOUR M)AT, MOTOR, EQUIP- 
IffiNT A TRAILER 

YOUR LIAUUTY TO OTHERS 
ARISING FROM THE USE OP 
BOAT. 

MEHCAL PAYMENTS 

12 MONTHS OTBRXTnM^ 

UNRESntlCTED TCRRITORIAL 
LIMITS. 

PREMIUMS I!«3.UM^0VER- 
AGEJ»R raYSKiO: DAM- 
ACS $TOO,000. WAtERCRAFT 
LIABILITY AND $1,000 MEU- 
CALPAYMBiTS. 



CHECK 
WITH US 
FOR COST 

COMPARISON 



»^ 





money. 

Save this chart 



I 

r 
I 

L 



Examples of I^ng Distance rates for station-to-station coagt-to-coast catls 



Operator>ajwisted 
calls 



Dial-direct 
calls 



I 
I 



Weekends 



8 a.m. to 
11 p.m. Sat. 
and 8 a.m. to 
5 p.m. Sun. 



$1.40 
firsts minutes 



70fl 
first 3 minutes 



■ Evenings 
I 



5 p.m. to 
11 p.m. Sun. 
through Fri. 



$1.40 
first 3 minutes 



85^ 
first 3 minutes 



I 
I 



Nights 



11 p.m. to 
8 a.m. daily 



$1.40 

minimum call 

(3 minutes) 



35^* 

first minute 

(minimum call) 



I 8 a.m. to 

I Weekdays 5 p.m. Mon. 
■ through Fri. 



$1.85 
first 3 minutes 



$1.45 
first 3 minutes 



@r 



425-7220 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Rates sluwn {tax is not included) are for the 
days, hours, and durations indicated, and for 
the typee of calls in>0cified at the head of the 
columns. Rates may be even leas, of course, 
on out-ofHBtate calls for shorter distaiujes, 

Dial-H-your»^ rates apply^n all intemtate 
calls (excluding Alaska) com^fetod firom a 
i«^ence or business phone without operator 
aiMlBtanoe. They also apply on calls placed 
whh an opearaior from a resid^Doe (n* business 



I 

Youraavings _ 

when you I 

"dial it yoQwer* ■ 

• ■, I I , 1 , ; . I iii rt ii I I ' i r ii i 

I 

fizBt 8 minutee ■ 
■ 

1 

I 

, --I 

miniawoncall | 
^1 
I 
I 
I 
I 



mi 

fizst3mimit«i 



first 8 minutee 



phone wbote direct-dialing facUitiflS are m% 
available. For dial-diiect rates to Hawaii, check 
your operator. Dial-direct rates do not apply to 
pearson-to-person, coin, hotal-gueet, credit-card, | 
or collect calls, or to calls charged to another ■ 

numbwr, because an opwstor must aswst Oft 

such(^&. I 

*0ne-m&3ute-minimiun calk availabte only ■ 
at tfe» times db^mn^ and addititmal minutes 

are ^4iadi, coast tocoflMrt;. I 



«=»^ 



Long Distance calling can be very inexpensive. 

E^ial^ if you di&l direct and call ^Hien the rates 
are tlie lowest. 

This chart will help make it easy. 

So «ut it out. And keep it by your phone. 

Itll ^p save you comdd^able money. 

The nxxe you know about your telephone, the more ifs worth. 

@C&P1elephone 



y/ 







■iMMiMifcrr^ 



mm 



pp 



■■■ 



1^^ 



iPHMPP^B^"^ 



mm^^^^m 



mmf 



mmm 



pjgg A^I-^The Sun-V^edn«sday, April 3, 1974 

Housing— 



(Continued trom page A-1) 

people are just happy to be in 
adequate housing with 
bathroom facilities and running 
water. 

"Friendship Village is rough 
socially." says Cammy Pshar, 
of Uie Virginia Beach Social 
Se'rvices Department "But. it's 
a take it or teave it situation for 
those persons who need 
housing. And if someone doesn't 
like it. there's always a list of 
others who want in. The only 
way people leave it, or any 
other project, is if they are 
evicted or they die." 

Patty Broderick, manage* of 
Bayside Arms, believes any 
problems in a housing project 
can be corrected by 
management. 

"You need management, 
maintenance personnel and 
administration who cares about 
where Uiey work, as well as 
residents who care about where 
they live," says Ms. Broderick. 
"If you treat people like they're 
low-income persons, they're 
going to act like they are low- 
income. But, if you treat them 
with the proper attitude, there 
are fewer behavior problems." 

B/VVSIDE ARMS, owned by 
Edwin Kellam, is managed by 
Urasan Realty. The [woject is 
a limited dividend business 
venture. Mr. Kellam receives 
no more than 6 per cent of the 
equity annually. All applicants 
must receive HUD approval 
and rents are subsidized. The 
project caters to disaster 
victims, persons living in 
substandard housing, persons 
over 62 years of age, the 
handicapped, active military or 
those displaced from their 
homes by the government. The 
Bayside Arms community is 98 
per cent black. 

Ms. Broderick, like managers 
of Williams Village and the 
Atlantis Apartments, believes 
that the way to eliminate the 
stigma of low-moderate income 
housing is to work with and 
educate the people. Since 
Larasan's management take- 
over last year, she has worked 
.to establish a rapport with 
residents and get them involved 
in community activities like 
Boy Scouts and a clean-up 
|n-ojecls. 

Williams Village, which only 
opened in March 1973, has not 
developed its educational 
program. The 90-unit complex 
is owned by the Mason 
Memorial Church of God in 
Christ, a Norfolk church group, 
and managed by National 
Management Corporation. 
Rents are not subsidized, but 
adjusted from $93 to $143, 
according to the tenants 
incomt. » 

FRED HODGES, manager of 
Atlantis Apartments, believes 
in getting people involved 
within the apartment 
community. There is an 
Atlantis Residents' Council, 
wWch is the tenants' governing 
body. The com[dex also has 
programs fa* the elderly, social 
progrMos and adult education 
seminara. Tenants stodc and 
operate a "Nothing New Shop." 

One of the big problems in all 
apartment cwnplexes is child 
care. Atlairtis operates a child 
development center for 
residents and non-residents 
with the cooperation of students 
at Tidewater Community 
College. Operating costs are 
taken from fees paid for the 
service, and there is no 
governmental support. 

Atlantis is owned by a non- 
profit organization called 
Vohinteers of America, a group 
which has % similar projects 
around the natioa Twenty per 
cent of the rentalls are 
sid>sidized for persons making 
less than $4,000 a year. Ei^ty 
per cent of the project is rented 
on an adjusted income scale to 
perstHis making t>etween $4,000 
and $7,000 per year. There is 
about a SO-SO racial mix d 
pwsons in the apartment 
complex, which includes young 
couples, single parents, 
military personnel and the 
ddo-ly. 



RKSinFNTS OF THE 

apartment complex, though * 
skeptical about talking to 
members <rf the press, say .they 
like living there. "It's nothing 
(dush, but it's nice, and I can 
afford it," said one lady who has 
lived in Atlantis for 2>i! years. 
"It certainly is better than the 
old run-down place I had 
befwe." 

The biggest problem at 
Atlantis is that there are not 
enough housing units to go 
around. An addition to the 
complex, which had HUD 
approval and even has city 
water and sewer, was canceled 
when President Nixon put a 
freeze on federal housing 
money in 1973. 

"But. some of those funds 
were channeled through the 
federal revenue sharing money 
to the cities and to our city 
council who has p^t the money 
into roads, patiis and tennis 
courts." says Mr. Hodges. 
"That money that would 
otherwise have been earmariced 
for housing improvements." 

RESIDENTS AND 
MANAGEMENT d the low- 
moderate income housing now 
in the Beach believe the 
substandard housing exists and 
lower rentals are not available 
simply because the city doesn't 
care about the housing 
situation. 

"If the City Council gave a 
damn about the housing 
situation, it would have' done 
something about the problem a 
long time ago," says Mr. 
Hodges. "Housing has always 
been a political football. My 
general impression is that the 
City Council is too busy with 
other things and ignores the 
need tar low-moderate income 
housing as well as the needs (A 
those who are living in 
substandard housing, who are a 
powerless pec^le." 

"The dty fathers just don't 
care," says Patty Broderidi, 
manager of Bayside Arms. 
"They, like most people, just 
don't want to get involved." 

MOST VIRGINIA BEACH 

City Councilmen say they don't 
know much about the low- 
moderate income projects in 
the Beach. Some of them didn't 
know that more than one 
(M-oject existed when contacted 
about the housing situation. 
They are aware that there is a 
lot of substandard housing in 
the city but don't know what to 
do about it. Likewise, they say 
they don't know how to 
encourage more low-Income 
housing. 

And, it's not that there isn't 
enough housing in Virginia 
Beach. It's ftat most cf the 
rentals w tome prices surpass 
the income of many persons. 
There are other lower rentabr 
besides the federally subsidized 
projects, but lack (A proper 
management is turning that 
housing into ghetto areas, 
sometimes worse than the 
substandard houses. 

"The trend here has been to 
cater to the affluent res(H-t-type 
person," says Mr. Hodges. 
"People here see adequate 
housi^, but it's not accessable 
to them." 

THE PIJVNNING DISTRICT, 
of which Virginia Beach is a 
member, is preparing a repwt 
on ttie area housing situatimi 
with hopes of coming up with a 
regional sohitioa 

"If you don't have to deal with 
the people involved on a day to 
day basis, if s easy to say let's 
deal with it on a regional )>asis," 
says Mr. Hodges. 

"But, what do you say when a 
man comes begging for housing 
and says i'm not going to live in 
that place one mo-e night My 
baby woke up with a snake in 
his bed this morning.'" 

Next week: The foture for 
cleaning ap the Beach's 
substandard housing and 
construction of more low- 
moderale income hmslng io the 
city. 




im/vn 



NEW 

ADVERTISING RATES 

CLASSIFIED & RETAIL DISPLAY 

$2.52 

per column inch 

NO COmHACr NiCtSSAMY 
fff«ctiv« Jan. 9. 1974 

Circulation IS.OOO to 25,000 wetkly 
miimiiR circulatioii 1S,000 weekly 

"it flays to odvorfise 
in Tho Sun" 

CALL ^^-3430 TODAY! 
A«C y«l ADVtOTiSIMO, 




indecent exp€}sure fine 
strips streaicer of $100 



A wiUow 
may need 

repairing 

When a willow weeps, 
does it need to be 
repaired? Although it 
seems as if telephone 
lineman Howard Ives is 
worliing on a towering 
weeping willow, lie is 
actually behind the tree 
repairing a telephone 
cable. (Sun photo by 
Rod Mann) 
I 



George W. Keviffi!, manager 
of the Tiki Restaurant of 
Atlantic Avenue, was convicted 
Wednesday ii; Goieral Dtetrict 
Court of indecent exposure. Mr. 
Keville, 21, of 21st Street, was 
arrested about 8:30 p.m. Mareh 
24 DHMnents after he streaked 
thrmigh the Bearded Clam 
Restaurant on the Steel Fishing 
Pier. 

Judge P.B. White said, 
"We're not gdng to tderate Uiis 
in Virginia Beach." He fined 
Mr. Keville $100 and court costs 
and sentenced him to 10 days in 
«jail, with the jail term 
suspended on condition of 
payment of the fine and costs. 

Detective J.G. M^lesky told 
the court he was in the 
restaurant, which was iHKnipied 
by about 200 people, at the time 
Mr. Keville ran through the 
restaurant naked carrying his 
clothes undo- his arm. Det. 
Malesky said he joined 
restaurant owner Tom Collins 
in pursuit of Mr. Keville as he 



fled from the restaurairt^ They 
overtook him in a field behind a 
supermariiet near Norfolk and 
Mediterranean Avenues as he 
was putting his clotiras on. 

During dte trial Mr. Collins 
stated this was not the first 



incident of streakers running 
through the restaurant, but he 
was unable to catch the others. 
Mr. Keville noted an appeal of 
the conviction. However, he 
paid the fine and costs at the 
trial's conclusioff. , /"» 



6 years probation for 
Sandler seafood theft 



Roy T. Carrico III was placed 
on six years probation 
Thursday for his part in the 
theft last April of $1,000 worth of 
seafood from SandlerFood Co. 
on Diamwid Springs \toad. 

Circuit Court Jud| 
Russo placedtMfbC 
Bayside Road, on 
after suspending a 
prison sentence. Judge 
also ordered him to 




Philip L. 

>^. 

prooafion 

four-year 

Russo 

make 

restitution of $333 as his share at 
the seafood's value. 



In other action. Judge Russo 
placed Thomas C. Staylor on six 
years probation following his 
conviction of two charges of 
burglary. Mr. Staylor, 22, 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, was 
convicted of thefts of tools from 
a Davis Comer service station 
last September. 

Judge Russo placed Mr. 
Staylw on six years probation 
on each conviction but 
permitted the sentences to be 
served concurrently. 







Graceful, h^h and low loop 

texture design. 100% bulky 

continuous filament nylon 

pile for durability and easy 

care. 8 new fashion shades. 



Random-shaeired design by 
Mohawk Mills. 15 up-to-the- 
minute colors to choose from 
A truly elegant carpet and a 
great buy this weekend. 



A great random shear tufted 
carpet of 100% Kodel lll« 

polyester. This carpet features 

a boldly carved rhythmical 

pattern. |6 striking colors. 



PRACTICAL LOOP 

Practical, tight, level loop of 
100% continuous filament 
nylon. 8 great space-dyed 
colors for lasting beauty. 




great t)uy this weekena. y . 

S5M ^OM ^5M 



UmH 65 Sq. Yds. pw ciatam*' 



LEVEL LOOP 

Long wearing tight level loop 

carpet with 100% nylon pile. 

choose from 8 of today's 

most practical colors. 



Lmil 70 Sq Yds p« customer 
MdMoniVTBrd«||#^f7 95 Sq Yd. 



TWO-COLOR FRIEZE 

Great two-color Frieze tweed 
100% nylon pile for long wear 
Choose from 19 tweed tones. 



Umtt 85 Sq. Yds. nr customw 
MdHional yaidag* $12.M Sq. Yd 



UmH 70 Sq. Yds p*r customw. 
A<k»lon«l ywdcg* $7.9$ Sq. Yd. 



Alexander Smith US' TWO-COLOR SHA6 



Elegant velvet-like plush with 

graceful can/ing and lustrous 

low-level loops. 100% nyk)n 

pile for durable luxury. 

16 great colors. 



Handsome two-color body 

shag of 100% heat-set nyton 

14 sparkling cotors for a 

decorator's delight. 



KODEL'SHAG ^ 

Carefree stain-resistant shag 

of 100% Kodel* polyester 

pile — the fat fiber. Real 

luxury in 19 rich hues — 

both sdkls and tones. 

$q.l/d. 

Umtt eo Sq. Yds. par cuslonwr. 
Additional yardage $13.95 Sq. Yd. 

Mohawk 

Great nubby phish shag by 

Mohawk Mills! Long-wearing 

nyton pile. 18 beautiful 

colors to choose from. 

See this shag value. 



A decorative new twist in a 

shag, combining plump and 

tightly twisted tufts. 100% 

high luster nylon pile. 18 

beautiful colors. 

sq»ffd, 

Umit 86 Sq. Yds. par customer. 
AdditenM yardage $9.95 Sq. Yd. 



Mohawk 

Tip-sheared, tufted carpet of 

100% Antron*ll nylon. 

Diffused pattern in 16 

misty-soft color stoppings. 




Alexander Smith 10 

Gf«ar level-k)op tweed, tight 

gauge provides a fine wev ing 

Mjrtace. 8 dear tweed \tx\es. 

100% oorMnuous 

filament nylon. 

SflfdiasUUied 

Ub* 80 Sq. Ydt par ewjmjf . 
Aikttanal yardage $8.96 Sq. Yd. 



Alexafider Smith 10 

Contemporary multi-level 
design of 100% DuPont nyton. 

Available in two-cok>r 
combinations and solkis. 

17 bright, dear colors.. 



A beautifully constructed shag 
of 100% Hercuton Polypro- 
pylene. Heat set for longest 
possibale wear. Available in 
1 7 solids and tweeds. 



SCROLL PATTERN 



A truly vibrant scroll pattAn 

caipet. 16 stunning color 

combinatk>ns of statk: free, 

soM-resisting Cadon.* 



LUXURY Sin 



Thtek polyester pile shag in a 
dozen outrageously t>eautiful 
colors. Heavy shag constnjc- 
tion for enduring good kx>ks. 



mss mM i9^3 



PLUSHER PLUSfl 

An elegarrt saxony plush 

carpet of 100% heat set 

nyton. 19 high style shades. 

Don't m«s this one! 



S9 ^^ ^' U^ InstaUed sqifdinsiaiied sq. fgd Installed &2^^R 

^^^VAMv^F Uirtl 80 Sq, Yds per customer Urrti 86 Sq. Yds. psr customer^ Limit 69 Sq. Yds. par ciMtomer 'U^KW^^^^ 

^^^ ^ ^^^ ^^ •.uw,..!^ Molten* «!!> M Ra Vii MilliBnal ysrdaoa $13.95 Sa Yd. _^^ui__.i ,..rrf.n> aio e? Cn v<4. a . . »■ ■ 



squdinstailed 

Un« 70 Sq. Yds. per, customer. 
' AdlMml y«i>ags $12 96 Sq. Yd. 



Umll86 Sq. Yds. psr customer. 
Mdttmal yardage $13.96 Sq. Yd, 



Limit 69 Sq. Ydi. per ciKtomer 
Additional yardage $12.67 Sq. Yd. 



sqifdiasiaOed 

UmH 65 Sq Yds. par customsr. 
Additional yardage $18,95 Sq Yd, 




HfhadaifcutiAese 

1. COSTS HAVE BEEN SKYROCKETING . . . 
We are struggling to keep these low retail prices. 
However, we have been notified that prices 
ar« axpected to increase as much as 30% in 
sonwcmm. 

2. Most of the prices in effect this weekend are 
lower than many 1973 prices! 

3. We have been warned to expect carpet 
^wrtaget due to the shortage of petroleum 
producto (the raw material from which carpel I* 
matte) and the energy required to operate the 
carpet mills. 



fcr Cite full narf 

lfvmlKiyiliniglliisbig28-lmsal8l 

Abbey's 99 store buylng-power brings you the best value for your dollar. 
And now through Sunday you'll save TWICE: 1) Our very best deal plus 
2) FREE CREDIT for a whole year on any installed orderl You can count 
on Abbey for a» newest carpet styles and colors, and they're all sale 
priced nowl All perfect quality, of couree. ^»d remember, at Abb^ our 
installation is always perfect. Sale ends 6 p.m. SsMfday. 



Why pay ANY INTEREST 
when you can (^t a year's 
credit absolutely free at 
Abl)«y during this salel 

EXAMPLE 

Cash Price S400 

Down Payment %% 100 
12fflonMy 
payments of $25 
•■ch,Ap«»'74 

thru Mar. '78 300 

Deferred payment 

price $400 

Finance Charge , None 

tanuai psrcentaoe 

0% 




JAMES OnURY: 

"Abtoy carpeted our home.' 

PHYLUSDRURY: 

"WI«ynoltriktoAM)*y 

riMUt oarpeUng your 

homa?" 



H mms installation is always perfect. Sale ends 6 p.m. Saturday. rM. .. 0% . -. 

MHETS CARPETED JWEB 275J00 AIIERICApOliESI Why not tafctoAhhey abort caiTietingpirh^^^ 



507 HILLTOP PLAZA Next to Zoyres 425-7264 



3574 N. MiilTABY HV^V. 1 MHe No rth of Almarf Ikh. ImH 

No« ■■ atomi C^ite.«hi/w«.ad./(kwon/Hewail/Uial«/We«h«»^?n/(^rado/Mw^M/WawMarteB/A»aaBa/^l»/WHae^ 



AT ABBEY YOU ALWAYS GET: 

CURRENT STYl£S*FQIUUJn 
MJIOUSMIUS- EVERY COUm 



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Shop early for a lawyer 
to fit the family budget 



rhildren. A policy of the city social services 
department prohibits publication of pictures 
of foster children. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



Foster families give love 



Joanne is 15 and terribly 
unhappy. Her divorced mother 
has recently remarried, but 
Joanne doesn't get along with 
her new stepfather. Tensions at 
home contribute to trouble at 
schod. 

Joanne is a constant truant, 
gets poor grades and wants to 
leave home. Sut where can she 
go? 

Hopefully, she could go 
temporarily to a happy, loving 
* foster family sudi as the hOTie 
of Rosa £»id Curtis Wilson, 
where she could live until she 
irons out her personal problems 
and returns to her own home. 

This is what the foster family 
plan run by the Virginia Beach 
DQ>artment of Social Services 
a about It attempts to provide 
temporary homes for children 
who mvst leave their own 
homes for some reason. 

NOW, JXJRi'nG National 
Action for Foster Children 
"Wedc, which ends Saturday, the 
Social Services Department 
; wants to recognize local faster 
parents. 

Rosa ai^ Curtis Wilsm have 
been foster parents to 14 
iUfferent children since they 
took in the first child in 1966. 
The Wilsons now have five 
foster children in their home, 
Ranging in age from 3 months to 
fl? years. 

g- The WilsoiB decided to apply 
flo become foster parents ^fter 
^ Jheir two ddest sons left hwne 
and their youngest swi, Calvin, 
inow 15, was lonely for some 
sibling c(8npanionship. 
• "We saw on television about 
t>ecoming foster parents, so we 
fwt in for one child," Ms. 
Wilsai, 50, explained. "Instead 
we got three," she laughed. 



THE THREE CHILDREN. 

two girls and a boy, were from 
the same family, she said, and 
the Social Services Department 
did not want to break up the 
family. 

Some cf their foster children 
have stayed with them only a 
short time on an emergency 
basis, and some have stayed for 
years. 

Everyone pulls his own 
weight around the Wilson house, 
Ms. Wilson said, except the two 
babies. Ms. Wilson, a school bus 
driver, is gone much of the day. 

Mr. Wilson, 53, had to quit 
wwk after 24 years as a 
mechanic for Sears in Norfolk. 
He is disabled. He watches the 
very young children while his 
wife is gone during the day. 

SHE SAID THAT working and 
trying to raise five children is 
notasdiffKultas it might seem, 
especially with Mr. Wilson at 
home to help. 

"With three of his own 
children, he should know how to 
take care of babies," Ms. 
Wilson laughed. 

The Wilson home on Princess 
Anne Road near the municipal 
center is comfortably furnished 
and not as crowded as it might 
seem with seven people living in 
it The three-bedroom home has 
a converted garage as a 
playroom for the children. 

The Wilsons receive $390 a 
month for room and board for 
all the children. They receive 
$60 per month for each of the 
two babies and $90 per month 
for each of the older children. 

ALTHOUGH IT sounds like a 
lot of money, Ms. Wilson said, 
"It's not so much money when 
you really look at it You have 
no idea of the wear and tear on a 
house from all those children." 

She said they received only 



$50 per month far the younger 
children and $55 per month for 
the older ones until the 
allotment was raised late last 
year, thanks mainly from 
pressure from the Foster 
Parents Association, to which 
the Wilsons belong. The money 
comes from a combination of 
city and state funds. 

Few, if any, foster parents 
take in children only for the 
money, Jtf^WilsOT believes. 

The mahi reason tlliey are 
foster parents, Ms. Wilson said, 
is because "we love children. 
And we want to help the 
children." 

The Wilsons are one^ of 67 
approved foster families in 
Virginia Beach and one of only 
14 black families. There are 
approximately 345 foster 
children here in foster homes 



and institutions. 

PROSPECTIVE foster 
families are thoroughly 
screened before they are 
approved, according to Cindy 
Bright, foster home 
coordinator. 

She said that the recent 
incident involving foster father 
Lee Edward Snjfller is the oily 
allegation of its type she has 
ej(|r hfiir*! about a foster 
family or parent. 

Mr.. Snyder has been charged 
with sodomy and contributing to 
the delinquency of a minor. Two 
of his former foster children, 
both tM)ys, accused their for.mer 
fester father of committing 
sexual acts with them. 

Ms. Bright pointed out that 
Mr. Snyder has been accused 
but not tried on the charges. 



By PETER WEAVER 
Consumer Colomntet 

Hardly a day goes by when we don't sign 
something, say something (»* do something tliat 
could spring a costly legal trap. 

Mostof usdon'trealizewhata legalistic world we 
live in until it's too late. A home starts falling apart 
and the builder dr landlord won't fix it. The car is a 
bitter lemon. There's a fire or accident and the 
insurance company won't pay the true costs. The 
list is endless. 

When the trap is sprung and we need legal help 
in a hurry, we're told: "Get a lawyer!" It's easy 
enough to get lawyers' names. They're listed in 
irfione bo(A tellow pages and the "Martindale- 
Hubbell Law Directory" found in most libraries. 

GETTING NAMES is nothing. Getting a good 
lawyer for a price you can afford is something else. 
Lawyers charge anywherdrom $25 to $55 an hour 
and up. The trick is, to find out how Iwig a certain 
service will take. Some lawyers charge flat fees, 
such as one per cent of the purchase price for 
screening possible pitfalls in buying a new home. 
Other lawyers will do the same job for less— much 
less— if you shop around. 

But, how do you shop for prices? Most local bar 
associations, controlled by lawyers, prohibit ad- 
vertising by price or specialty. In some instances, a 
consumer has to pay a "consulting" fee to even find 
out what the lawyer will charge for a specific job. 
Some will talk price. Others are coy. 

The best way to get good legal service on a 
continuing basis is to line up a lawyer before you're 
in any kind of trouble. Get names from friends and 
business acquaintances who have worked with a 
liiwyer they like. If you get a good lawyer who 
practices preventive law, you can head off 
problems before they become serious — and costly. 

LOCAL BAR ASSOCIATIONS in some areas 
have a "lawyers' referral service" which provides 
names of lawyers who will listen to your problems 
and give advice at the rate of around $15 for the first 
half hour. If more woric is needed, the referral 
lawyer will tell how much it will cost. Sometimes 




Food B-2 

Sun Dial •..,..... B-2. 

Raligion ■•• B>3 




' Seri ea 

Thb ii the final article of a three-part series in which 
eonmmtr expert Peter Weaver ex'ptains where free or in- 
expensive legal aid It jvaikbk and offers advice on how to 
act as your own lawyer. 

you get good legal service this way. Many times you 
don't. It's a legalistic lottery. 

Thai there are the prepaid legal services where 
you get a certain amount cS consultation, court 
work (if need be) and document preparation for a 
fixed monthly fee. Groups such as unions, 
associations, clubs, even churches, hire their own 
lawyers to handle members' (and families') legal 
needs with no restrictions. Bar associatiohs are 
often hostile, but group legal services are 
flourishing anyway. Costs per family average $3 to 
$5 a month. For more information on how your 
group can set up a prepaid legal service plan, 
write: National CoMumer Center for Legal Ser- 
vices, Dept. KF, 1750 New York Ave. N.W., 
Washington, D.C.20006, 

Insurance companies, such as Stonewall 
(Birmingham, Ala.) and Insurance Company of 
North America (Philadelphia, Pa), sell group plans 
which allow members to choose their own lawyers 
much in the manner of medical insurance. A typical 
plan costs around $6.50 a month per member family 
and is limited to legal fee reimbursement claims of 
up to $1,000 a year. These insurance-type plans are 
obviously more costly but might be better suited for 
groups whose members are spread out 
geographically or have a wide variety of income 
levels and needs. 

Don't be afraid to talk price before you buy any 
legal service. For an excellent, "Shopper's Guide 
To Lawyers," send $1.00 to: Consumer Insurance, 
Dept. KFi 813 National Press BIdg., Washington, 
D.C. 2004. 

Husa to direct 
band concert 

' Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Karel Husa will 
be guest conductor when the Kellam High School 
Wind Ensemble performs Mr. Husa's "Music for 
Prague 1968" Thursday at 8 p.m. in the school 
auditorium. 

Mr. Husa, originally from Czechoslovakia, wrote 
the piece after the Soviet takeover of his country. 
He is now on the faculty of Cornell University. 

He will arrive in Virginia Beach today to wOTk 
with the band students |n-ior to Thursday's per- 
formance. 

Jack Sperry, Kellam High band director, said 
that the stuctents raised the money to pay Mr. 
Husa'sperformancefeewhile the {n-oceeds from the 
Kellam High Band Parents' recent amateur night 
will cover hib travel and lodging expenses. 

Tickets for the perfwmance are $1.50, available 
at the door. 



'sgetlowbox 



We went to the movies the other night, my 
husband and I, and we noticed there's a new *ge- 
price category. You now get in for a dollar less at 
some theaters if you'll admit to being over 55. 

Golden Age it's called on the box office price list. 
And it isn't printed above the adult listing or even 
between adult and student, but at that humiliaAng 
position known as last, bottom or lowest. Evep 
children, who pay the least amount, enjoy a better 
billing than the Golden Agers. 

The cmiple in front of us locked as if they might 
qualify, ami the girl in the box office asked if they 
wanted Golden J^e tickets. The man, who probably 
conned his way into move§ as a kid long after he 
was twelve to save a quarter, was now conning his 
way pass the box office to pay a dollar more. 

"NOT ME!" be said, glancii^ about himself 
nervously. "Maybe my vwfe here, ha, ha, but not 




'^me." His wife looked pained and smiled grimly. 
"Me neither," she said and they passed for adults. 

"What do you think?" I asked my husband. 
"Want to say we're 55 and save two dollars?" He 
gave me his George Washington look. "That would 
be lying, 't he said. 

"Yeah," I answered, "but we could bend over 
and wheeze a Uttle. Two dollars is two dollars. 



HE SUCKED in his stomach and told r^we'd 
never get away with it. And he was probably right. I 
mean, I'm not getting older, I'm just getting better, 
and he's still grabbing for all the gusto he can get. 

But what's going to happen when we can't pass 
as adults ai^niore? Maybe it would help, even with 
the price of gold what it is today, if theaters called * 
people over 55 Wisdom A^rs instead of Golden 
Agers. And gave them a billing above adults so that 
along with slipping dentures and waistlines, they 
don't have to handle sUn>ing prestige as well. 

After all, eastern cultures have always elevated 
the aged and affonted them honor and respect. I'll 
never like egg foo yung, but when I get to be 55, 1 
think I'd rather go to the movies on the Giioa. 



'Mary^ is funny bone tpkler 



^ 



What do you get when eight young forest rangers meet 
seven youni ladies from fiie Eastehester Finishing Schod 
at a Cdorado Inn? Nothing but comedy. 

And the two groups meet in the musical comedy play 
"Uttle Mary Sunahftie." In the spoof m the old-fashioned 
melodramas performed at the turn <rf the century, "Little 
Mary SunAine" (and her friemds) tidiled the funny bones 
of Vii^inia Wesleyan College students and paraits with 
their performance at the cdlege last week. 

Clad in red and blade uniforms, accented by white tip 
tennis shoes, the forest rangers paraded down the aisle in 
the college science airiitorium to tte Cdcrado Irai owned 
by Little Mary SunsWne. It's there they gave their h^rts 
to the "prominent" prls from the Eastehester Finishing 
Schod. But, in the meantime, Little Mary Sunshine's 
mwtgage is about to be foreclosed, the Imlians are «j the 
ramiwge and the forest rangers are called away oo a 
" Amgerous'Linissioa 

Tliis is the first time in the cdlege's Mstwy flat ttie 
drama and music departments Ifflve combined talents in a 
major froduction. Ami the performers are tatented in 
both singii« and actii«. But. in some caws they seem 
afraW totetthat talent out The pJay's dramatically hinny 
lin» at times lose a little because the perfonmrs just 
arrart hammy enough. <One wouW think a groiq) of 
c(^ge stixteite wouU ha^ no froidste bdog banuny.) 

BECAUSE OF THE numb«- of stu^nts involved in the 
(^iUe^ mudc and drama courses, maio' (rf the roles in 
■yttle Mary Sunshine" lave been double rast to give 
evenrew a dianee at startan. 

Last WedneMlay, Mck Hl^his starred at the leader of 
ttie forest rar^ers. Captain "Big Jim" Warii^ton. 
P«1rayta« &m "Dudley Do-ri^t" type <rf the ^y, he 



Rev i esAi 

The musiad comedy "Little Mary SunAine, " performed 
by Wesleyan CoOege students at the cailege last week, will be 
an stage at tiie Chrysler Mumtm Theane Friday throu^ 
Sunday. Admistiwi vMbeSl for museum member%J5 cenU 
for students, military personnel and senior citiier^nd $1.50 
for other perstms. Curtain time is 8 p.m. for ^ p&formmees. 

delivered one (rf the show's best performances with his 
courtship of Little Mary Suiaiune. Mr. Higgins has one of 
the show's stnm^t voices. 

Little Mary SunsMne, played 1^ Eileirat Dwsey, is cod 
towaid the aptain's nmuiMc advances, and like tlw 
ftnisiang schod ^rlt, she is coy in aU of ho- deaUngs with 
the forest rangers. Ms. Dorsey, bowevw, underplays her 
swooi» and concentrates too much on foldii^ and 
unfokUi^ he- hands in fnmt d Imt. 

PERHAI^ THE standout in the show te Ctaidc Ratdiff, 
a CpL "Billy" Je8t». Mr. Rateliff is the onty one who 
real^ involves the audience witti his looks oat into space. 
Heniw»ea»Iy onstageand seons unaftakl to ham it up 
aMt 

aiadn Hatch, as Little Mary's maM Nancy Twidcle, is 
coqu^tish from beginning to end, and the audience seems 
to mijoy her escapades. 

Bowen JeM^ at the lediaws Gea Ouas Fairfax is 
well ciMt in tte role, thou^ in trying to make him lod( 
(^er, Ms niak«ip was a little overdone. 

The filching schod prb (EUaibeth Bemer, CywUe 
Bai*^ Uura Rusch, Viitf nia I^cfc. W«iKly Chick, 
Elaine Eckot and TrtHiy FeU^) aU seem to have good 
voi(». However, Laura Rusch as tte dumb blood iq>- 
stagra the odwr gM in te chorus every ttane with bH> b% 



eyes and sdt drawl. Ms. Rusch carnid utto- a line without 
sending Uie audience into laughter. 

And the forest rangers (Curt B|k«-, John Cissel, Larry 
Welker, Zeb Scott Chudc Woodwltd, Clyde Hughes, Dave 
Reynokis and Jim Fitzpatridc) clomp in and out of the 
auditorium proclaiming the virbies of the forest rangers. 
While all t(«ether on stage they sing wdl, occaslooaUy 
one d the rang«v marching past the auditorum seats win 
iBt a few sOu^ notes. 

THE SET. (imposed d a number d badcAtn;) ctvtains, 
is exceltent The curtaira, Iwwever. do nd ahvays drop as 
Uiey are vapfomA to. Ihe college students did a 
remarkable ^ turning a science auditorium lecture 
stap into a performi^ stage. It shauM be an entirebr 
jfifferent experience for the cast, howeve-, when die 
performers tdie Bie show to the Chryslw Museum 
Thoitre stage this wedt. 

Thefaee makeup d die In&n cMd and his son Yellow 
Feather is fascinating. Thdr war paint couU probaUy 
^ow in the dark. 

Credit shoubt^be given to bdh prdcMW Bentty 
Andenon (play diredi^-) and Dr. R. David Clayton 
(nufldc director) who maiaged to put tiK show b^dio-. 
(Mr. Bentley , was a show in Mnuetf W^taesday, as he ru 
firom one side d the auditntim to the odter adcuig 
penons in the audience eittter nd tosmcke or mjt to um 
flash cubes on titeir cani«w.) 

"Little Mary Sunshine" ta an esKxteit chdce f«r a 
ci^0ate |day. Ihe Wesleyan {»tidacd(Ht te deigned m a 
iMming exp«rtence for Uie studente. One wouM iMpe U»t 
from ttet exp^ience, ^ talent in the productioo wU 
cimae to try-out for oUwr loal theatre productians. 




PLAY REHEARSALS of the Vlrgtala 
Weslevan prodncttoB of "Little Mary 
Sunshine" don't Xwk like all work. In <^ 
«icetM ftvm the play, ^^y Hatch aad Richard 
Scott posf while phi^ographer David 
ReyiMMs Ukes "a picture for nother." tlw 
show win mn FrMay thr<wgh Sftnday at tte 
Chrvsler Mmean T^Mtre, N<N^«lk. 






•* 



«4 



" ^'-^' -P^f .- J.,,-A-^ J P' 



f>afeA-2— The Sun— Wednesday, April 3, 1974 




M 



TOR THE FUTURE 

■ ■ W* . I I 

. VE^a^ANSCLUB members 
of tidewater Community 
College, Virginia Beach 
campus, will participate in the 
Veterans Opportunity Fair at 
Old Dominion Field House 
Thursday from l to 6 p.m. 

DR. KAREL HUSA. Pulitzer 
Prize-winning composer, will 
conduct the Kellam High School 
Wind Ensemble Thursday at 8 
p.m. in the school auditorium. 
Tidiets are $1.50, available at 
thcLdoor. 



A CI^RITY dance 
benefiting the VirginiaBeach 
Emergency Coronary Care 
Program will be sponsored by 
ttie Beta Alfdia Chapter of Beta 
Sigma Phi Sorority Friday from 
9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the 
Commodore Club. The Sands of 
Time will provide music. Ticket 
donations of $8 per cou|rie may 
be made at the door. 

NANCY WYANT, wimrter 
of the Tidewater chapter, 
Amencan Institute of BaiUcing 
public speaking contest, wiU 
compete Friday with other 
chapters when local members 



r 




425-9335 



ORIENTAL ARTS & CURIOS 



HOURS: 10 a.iB. TO 5:00 p.in. 
CLOSED SUN. b MON. 

. 716 FIRST COLONIAL 
HILLTOP WKST 

(Behind McUiinalil.s on La.skin Kd.) 



attend the district public 
speaking ccmtest in Roanoke. 

FILMS for children at 11 a.m. 
Saturday at branch libraries 
are "The Hound That Thought 
He Was a Raccoon" at the 
Virginia Beach branch and 
"Millions ol Cats," "Time of 
Wonder" and "Over in the 
Meadow" at the Windsor Woods 
branch. 

NATIONAL TEACHER 

examinations will be given 
Saturday at Old Dominion 
University. Details may be 
detained from Dr. Franklin R. 
Jones, professor of educatlm, 
at 489-8000, ext. 302,303. 

CHAMBER music will be 
inresented in a chamber cmcert 
by the Virainia Beach Civic 
Symphony ^liiday at 3 p.m. at 
the Ft. Story Service Club to 
honor the symphony's patrons 
and sponsors. There is no 
admission charge. 

THE NAACF youth 
department, Virginia Beach 
l»-anch, will meet Sunday at 5 
p.m. at Mount Olive Baptist 



Church on South Birdneck 
Road. The branch regular 
meeting will be Monday at 7:30 
p.m. at First Bapttol Church, 
Lynnhaven, 2744 S. Lynnhaven 
Road. 

NAVY WIVES are invited to 
attend a pot luck social and 
installation of officers (tf the 
Nimitz Enlisted Wives' Club 
Tues(faiy at6:30 p.m. at the Ship 
'n Shore Wives' Club, Naval 
Operations Base, Norfdk. 

FOR THE RECORD 

A CHECK for $95 was 
in-esented to 13-year-old Mike 
Chestnut of Virginia Beach by 
Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Truxell, 
c(»ninanding officer (rf Inshore 
Undersea Warfare Group Two 
of the Naval Amphibious Base, 
Little Creek, to sponsor Mike's 
appearance in the Tidewater 
Soap Box Derby in July. 

YOUNG AUDIENCES Inc., 
Norfolk chapter, has added the 
Young Audiences Dance 
Ensemble oi the Virginia Beach 
Civic Ballet to its family of 
music ensembles. The Norfdk 



chapter is ot»erviiig Natioaal 
Vflung Audiences Week this 
week., .^ , . 

A PORTABLE air filtration 
unit wiU be purchased by the 
Goieral Hospital of Vir^nia 
Beach loing |bs donated 1^ the 
Driftwood Circle of the Kings 
Daughters. The circle raised 
the money during the Pembrdce 
Mall charity bazaar bat fall. 



THREE WRITERS from 
.Virginia Beach have been 
honored in the Iroie Leache 
Memorial Literary Contest. The 
winners were announced March 
29 at the Chrysler Museum. 
Joseph H. Harkey wcm second 
prize for traditional verse and 
John Coward won second prize 
fw free vow. Samud W. Scott 
received an honorable mention 
for traditional verse. 



PUPPETS made by members 
of 4ie educational department 
of the Virginia Beach Junior 
Woman's Club starred in shows 
performed recently at the 
Kempsville branch library. 
Family Fair at Military Cirde 



ai^ Galilee Episcopal Church. 
Hie piqipet shows for chiUrm 
were entitled "Barnyard 
Frolics." 



"A FRIEND in Need" was 
the title of the Qrst place award- 
winning speech presoited by 
Louise Bumette at last wedc's 
annual club speech contest of 
t}ie Virginia Beach 
Toastmistress Club. Billie 
Dierks placed second in the 
contest and Jan Schindlo- third. 



CO-DIRECTORS of the 
Virginia ' Beach Emergency 
Coronary Care Program, Dr. 
James P. Charlton and Dr. W.A. 
Dkkinson, vien presented the 
Service to Maidiiiid community 
service award at last week's 
meeting of the Sertoma Gub at 
the Cavalier Oceanfront 



Item$ may be mbmttted toSm 
DU by HuO. neat mail your not- 
ketoSmDUl, Vlrffnla Beach Sun 
USRotemont Road, Ylrgtnla Beach 
Va. 23451 DeaOine Is noon Fri- 
day prior to the week of puUic- 
arion. 






I* 






9 
m 

* 



m 

9 

I" 
T 




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♦♦ 



4 



»» 



NO GROWTH 
OR 



KNOW GROWTH ??? 

It's getting harder 

and harder to set 

up housekeeping 

in Virginia Beach!!! 



"No growth" means not enough homes for new families. It means that growing 
families car^ move into larger homes. "No growth" means no housing for a lot of 

people. 

With the politically motivated "no growth" syndrome developing in Virginia Beach 
city government, this could be your son or daughter or brother or sister or you - 
tomorrow. 

If this couple buys a house in Virginia Beach . . 

• They will pay about $1,300.00 in initial construction fees. 

• They will pay for all streets, curbing, street lights, sewage and water ^ 
lines In their community, and for additional easements and open space which 
will be dedicated to the city. 

• They will pay about $4,500.00 In real estate taxes by the time they have a 
child of school age. 

• They will help you pay the $75 million G^urrent bonded indebtedness of 
the city, plus all future* debts. 

Does a new homeowner pay his own way? We think he does. And he reduces the 
-^ amomit you must pay. 

We know sensible grc^wth benefits every citizen. "We also know rampant^ un- 
controlled growth benefits no one". Planned community development must come as a 
result of responsible city government. The development of controls which are an- 
tisocial devices serve only political motives and are an admission, of past inaction. 

If you think "no growth" isn't a good idea, let your local government know. 

__^_ We've Got to Plan For The People 



^ 





TIDEWATER BUILDERS ASSOCIATION 

5^5 EAST VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
NORFOLK. VIRGINIA 23502 



SensilDie Growth 

Becau^ no growth makes no sense at all. 



FOOD 
Stretching tuna 
helps budget 



Hm meat nibstitiites can be 
expendve tndess tbqr are 
"irtr^cbed" with oUier inp^ 
(fients. Caiined aaafood — 
such as tuna and salmon — 
we among the ndti^utes 
which lend Uiemsdves well to 
strc^diing. 

The stretdied dishes need 
not be sudi ordinary dishes as 
creamed tuna or tuna salad. 
Some a<rtk dishes are in- 
qiired by faramiy places. 

In Italy, Tuna Spinach 
Frittata is a puddtav-like 
omdet, fried on t(q> of the 
range. In some areas 
Maritata is added to further 
define omelets which are in- 
ventively "married" to other 
r^onal foods. 

On« of tiw (Ushes making its 
apfftaxvaxx in fine Chinese 
restaurwits is "Velvet" - 
somewhat like a little pan- 
cake with a texture more like 
satin on Qie tongue and a 
flavor that defies description. 

TUHk SPINACH 
FKITiATA 

Vt cup well drained (xnktA 
ciMpped spinach 

2 tatdcspoons soft bread 
crumbs 

3 tablespoons milk 

V4 teaspoon grated tenon 
rind 
Vi teaspoon salt 



adv. 

FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

By PAUL ROMAN 

To give stewed apples a new 
flavor, try sweetening them 
with honey instead of sugar. 

Use a serrated steak knife 
when spreading cheese or 
spread on crackers and 
dainty sandwiches • also 
when putting icing on a 
cake! Really attractive! 

Don't throw away your 
plastic margarine tabs! Use 
them as gelatin molds. 
Lightly grease them and fill 
with gelatin. Let it jell, run 
warm water over the liottom 
for a couple seconds. Presto, 
a beautifdd mold. 



FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
MEAL - SPECIALIZING 
IN CHARBROILED 
STEAKS, MEXICAN FOOD 
AND LOW, LOW PRICES 
• TRY THE 




400 LASKIN ROAD 



V4 teai^raon dried dill weed 

Vb tett^oon sugar 

1 can (8^ or 7 ouDoes) tuna 

in veg^alde oil 
4 eggs, sU^Oy beaten 
1 tablespoon butter v mar- 

gvine 

hi large bowl mil tt^Oier 
qpinad), bread cnsnbs, milk, 
kmon rind, salt, diU and 
sugar. Add tuna and stir until 
broken into fine flakes. Add 
eggs; mix weU. Melt butter \^ 
large ddUet Fourin «gg mix- 
ture and cfKk without stirrbig 
over medium heat ttiree to 
five minutes, or until art and 
brown on bottom. Place brief- 
ly under faroUer to brown top. 
Cut into we(^M to serve. 
Yidd: four servings. 



TUNA Via^VET 

1 can (%% oc 7 ounces) tuna 
in vegetable oil . 

2 unbeaten egg nMtes 

2 teaqxxms cornstarch 
4 egg wMtcs 

Vi teaqxwn cream of tartar 

3 C19S chidten broth 

Flake tuna hi large bowl; 
add two unbeaten egg nMtes 
and c<Hnstarch; mhc well. 
Beat four egg vdtites witti 
cream of tartar untU stiff; 
mix lightly into tuna mixture. 
Heat chicken broth to boilii^ 
in large skillet. Drop taUe- 
spoons of tuna mixtire hito 
boiling broth. Codk about five 
minutes turning once. Re- 
move with slotted spoon. 
Serve with OUnese vege- 
tables. Yield: four servings. 



TUNA VELVET 
FRITTERS 

~ Cook tuna-egg white mix- 
ture in two ciqts salad oQ in- 
stead of broth. HeatoU to 365 
degrees F. Drop mixture by 
tablespoons into hot oU and 
cook until golden brown, 
about tlvee minutes, turning 
once. Drain well on absorboit 
papa:. Serve witti Light Sauce 
(Note) and Chinese vege- 
tables. Yield, four savings. 



(Note) 
Udfr SAUCE 



Wi ci|>s chidcen broth . 
2 tablespoons sherry 
Va teaqwoosalt 
4 teaqwons comstard) 
1 tee^oon soy sauce 
Vi teaspoon gtoiger ;^ 

Mix chicken broth, dierry, 
salt, cM-nstarch, soy and 
ginger in saucepan. Cook 
(stirring constantly) until 
mixture thickois and comes 
to a boil; boil one minute 
longer. YieU: About 1 and 
two-thirds cups. 



Cf I UkQa 1*1 



BKAl \\ S Al ONS 



Shampoo & S«t From $3.25 

Complalc Permanani Wovn ..S6.95 to $19.95 

Roux Fonci-Ton* Touch-up From $500 

Roux Frosting (Shampoo ft Set Extra) $12.50 

Haircut .$2.75 (Long Hair $3.50) 

No Appointment Nece$sary - Just Come In 



HILLTOP 
DAILY -8 'TIL 6:30 



Hilltop Plaza Shopping Cantar 
Latkin Rd. Naxt to Safaway 
IHiona! 42t-9«97 
Va. Baach 



DAILY -9 TIL 6 
THURS. - 9 'TIL 9 



silt Va. Baach Blvd.p734 E. 
Acrots from GEX I Uttia Craak Rd. 
Phona: 497-9769 I Naxt to Zayras 
Va. Baach I Phona: 5lt.9093 

I Norfolk 



^ 



^ 









A GK»GE RO WLyiM 

TUB ^rmo 

AI>CHMDD2W«CK DWCaiCWiniSENIMION 

Nominated for 10 Academy Aww'ds 




Dft« S <**» • GfOJGE IKDV mi • TONy Wl ond MCH^. t JUUA PMUJPS 




n. 



The Moral HngI? 

'By Father Lester 



«jb^: 



Food extortion 
same as stealing 

Dear Father Lester: 

Tte/Symbionese Liberation Army is demanding 
Uiat newspaper executive Randolj* Hearst give 
millions of dollars in free food to pec^le on welfare 
as ransom for the life of his daughter, Patricia. 
Some people eligible for the handout say they would 
refuse the food,; others would accept. Those who 
would refuse seem to be higher principled than 
the others. But is there any, mffd\ 
(4>ligation to refuse? 

• Cynthia H. 
Dear Cynthia: 

The "free" food would be extorted from the 
Hearsts and therefore would be stolen property just 
as much as the watch you "agree" to give the 
robber with a cannon pointed at your h^d. 

Dear Father Lester; 

To beautify ourselves, how far are we allowed to 
go in remodeling? For instance, may we get 
silicone injections, a nose-bob, an eyelid operation, 
or a hairline reshaping? 

LorettaA 



Dear Loretta: 

There must be some reason other than mere 
vanity to make the risk of health morally per- 
missible. 

For example, an actress whose livelihood 
depends upon her beauty may go to great pains and 
risk to keep her beauty. Likewise a young lady who 
feels that her nose is in the way of her popplarity 
and marriage would be free to have a "nose-bob." 
Yet the old dowager who merely wants a face lift 
for her mirror's sake would be indidging in empty 
vanity and (ordinarily may not undergo the risk. 

Dear Father Lester: 

A few years ago a young man in Seattle stuck a 
peace symbol on the American flag, and hung it out 
a window in protest against the U.S. action in 
Cambodia. He was arrested and convicted of 
desecrating the flag. His appeal will be heard by the 
Supreme Court. .^ 

Was it desecrating the flag or was it only an 
exercise in freedom of speech? 

The American Civil Liberties Union says con- 
viction would have a "chilling effect" on freedom of 
expression. 

C.N. 
Dear CM.: 

People are not free to libel, slander or in any 
other way cause unjust harm through speech. 
Freedom of speech is not absolute. 

But using the nation's flag disrespectfully en- 
courages disloyalty which is contrary to what is due 
the nation. Hence, such usage causes unjust harm 
and therefore ought to be banned. 

// you have questions for Father Lester, matt to MonU 
An^, Virginia Beach Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Virffnia 
Beadi, Va. 2345Z Please enclose a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope. 



CHURCH NOTES 



3 









ii 

2 



LENTEN meditations by 
Louise B. Wilson of Friends 
Meeting House will be 
featured during Lenten 
services today at noon in the 
chapel (A Virginia Beach 
United Methodist Churdi, 
207 18th St. Lenten services 
are held each Wednesday at 
noon. 

PALM SUNDAY services 
of the Messiah Lutheran 
Mission and St. Francis' 
Episcopal Church will be 
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. wiUi the 
Rev. Charles M. Riddle HI 
of Eastern Shore Chapel as 
guest Lenten service 
speaker^ Services will be at 
IK. Francis, 509 Rosemont 
Road. " 



I 

MUSIC by the Old 
Dominion University 
Concert 'Choir, under the 

direction of John J. Davye, 
assistant professor of 
music, will be presetted 
April 22 at Baylake United 
Methodist Church on Shore 
Drive. The concert is open to 
the public free of charge. 




The Sun-Wadnwday, April 3, 1974-Page B-3 



Clergy turn to ^pastoral counseling^ 



NEW YOWC — An increasing 
number of clergymen are 
finding full-time careers as 
counselors schooled in 
psychological tedtniques rather 
than as pastors preaching from 
pulpits. 

Hundreds of members of the 
clergy are seeing clients 
privately in settings similar to 
those of the psychologist and 
psychiatrist. Hundreds more 
a^ training for this specialty, 
whil^ large numbers of 
mimst^rs in the parish are 
participating in seminars and 
discussion groups to learn to 
deal more effectively with the 
(H-oblems they encounter on 
their daily rounds. 

The presence of so many 



clergymen in the psychol<^ical 
area has raised questions in the 
church as well as in the 
psycholo^cal profession. 

AN EFFORT TO deal with 
some of the questions has l)een 
made by the Institutes of 
Religion and Health, a 
IHoneering training program 
created in 1937 by Dr. Norman 
Vincent Prale and the late Dr. 
Smiley Blanton, a 

psychiatrist. Out of the clinic 
and an intensive postgraduate 
training course, which they 
developed, have grown a 
number d similar institutions, 
and a national standard-setting 
and accreditation body, the 
American Association of 
Pastoral Counselors. 



The Blanton-Peale Graduate 
Institute of the Institutes of 
Religion and Health conducted 
a symposium on pastoral 
counseling, the results of which 
were published in the Journal of 
Religion and Health, the official 
publication of the institutes. 



THK REV. STEPHEN 
PRICE, a resident in pastoral 
counseling at the counseling 
center maintained by Grace 
Epscopal Church in New York, 
who is completing his third year 
of trdning at the Institutes of 
Religion and Health, attempted 
to answer one of the more 
pressing questions: Is pastoral 
counseling a credible 



Honesty moMs friendships 



Following a long session of 
counseling with a man who 
-thought himself devoid of 
friendship,! boiled down all I 
knew to And the formula for 
friendship. In essence, it is to be 
honestly yourself. 

When you are a truly 
authentic person, and honestly 
place yourself face to face witii 
someone who has the same 
interests, and are sincerely of 
a like mind, there cannot help 
but come out of the 
relationship a real friendship. 
Apply this to your lifestyle and 
you have the basis for forming 
lasting and deep relationships 
tliat will be strong friendship 
all of your life. 

Now underline the words 
"common interests" because 
common experiences and mind 
set form the bridges over which 
personalities can exchange 
commitment which makes 
relationships possible. 

THE QUESTION then arises 
as to how this is to be done. "I 
am very shy ... I don't make 
friends easily ... I have been a 
loner all of my life." Anytime 
you want to be something other 
than one of the crowd you will 
find a welccnning hand. If you 
decide to work fa* your political 
party. ^ a service club, or4n a 
church,' y<xi raise your hand and 
say that you would like to have a 
job, and you will be inundated 
with offers you would not dream 
exist 

Now a word of warning. I ask 
you not to expect a miracle in 
the moment that you make an 
offer to do some of the wwk for 
some philathropic 
organization. Friendship 
circles form slowly. As warmly 
as the newcomer may be 
welcomed, it is only human 
nature to put that person on 
probation 

If he proves to be an 
interloper, archly forcing his 
way in too rapidly, he is likely to 
be frozen out Friendship is a 
letting down of the walls 
between people. If this person 
newest on the scene cannot be 
trusted with the sensitivity 
that comes with friendship, then 
the walls are rebuilt. 

IF HE PROVES to be a good 
natured, industrious, and 
willing to be open, and if he 
plays the waiting game with 
skill and patience, and shows 



£et's Ta/fe 

By 
Rev. W.L Truman 



that he is not a judgmental or 
bitter person, friendship will not 
be long in coming. 

At this prant in counseling, we 
usually pause for objections. 
You would like more friends, 
you say? The people in your 
community are the limited 
circle open to you. You say you 
don't have anything in common 
with them: You want to select 
your friends from among those 
sparkling, witty, talented, 
profound people. You want to go 
places and do things with these 
people. 

In truth, I share the same 



kind of inner soul longing, but I 
do not know who these people 
are. I have found that in prison 
or in the academic community, 
in the business world or in the 
church, there are as many bores 
as in any other area. 

MOST PEOPLE I know use 
the average number of 
platitudes and predictable 
routine remarks and once in a 
while there is a marvelous pun 
that is shared between us. After 
a good deal of reflection I have 
concluded that smart society of 
which you and I dream is really 
pretty much of a myth. 

It is a marvelous thing to have 
a friend, but you have to allow 
that person to be authentically 
himself. Sharir^g honestly 
without pretense forms the 
bonds which make up the honest 
friendship. 

It is nochche, in fact to "be a 
friend, -is to have a friend." Be 
what you want to find, and you 
will soon fi^d others of like 
mind, looking for you. 




9 STRONq 

chuRchcs 



A Second Career: 

Welcome Wagon 

Intonatioiial, Inc ^ 

wanttoav<md' 
the 9 to 5 job? 

Are you a "peopla per- 
son"? Want to develop 
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eartning foi" ySur effort? 
FULLAND PART TIME 
POSITIONS 
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN: 
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PEMBROKE 
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• • 



COMIVIUNITIES 




A THOUGHT 

FOR 
TODAY 
APRIL 3, 1%74 

By 

J.AitonBBttf, 

Mii^ter 

Saint Mark 

A.M.E. Ctarch 

"Man needs a new heart, 
made clean by the 
for^v«ies8 of God, and 
made strong . by the 
indwelling presence of 
Qirist Then noan must let 
Christ be fte Lord <rf aD". 



EMMANI^L TABERNACLE 
CHintCH-UPC 
tS7 Montoon Aw. 
(1 block off S. Lyiuihivm Rd.) 
Rsv. Harold Hiilka-Putot 
Riom: 340-7M3 
audqf Sdiool • 10:00 AJL 
PkMdilQg-7:30PJI. 
WMoMdiy 7:30 P.M. 

MbleStady 
'^vnyom Wcicome, Come 



BAYUKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

^QOaoRMve 
VlBmi* - 464-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead- 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

maak^moBtKf Itm /LU. 
V^nmi AU KW^OME. 



KEMPSVILI^ 
BAPTIST CHURCH 
S204MKiMfAn*RiMd 
Rev.CaunlMlLJoiiM 

Httat 
Sandw Sdhool - 9:45 AJI. 
Woo^- 11:00 AJ«. 
1WBfa«Uirian-6:15PJil. 
Br^ Worfh^ • 7:M FJl. 
WMfamd^ E«m^ • 7:1S PJH. 
hqm Itediv and Mile Study 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
CHURCH OP THE 
NAZARENE 



SS14 



Ph.4t7-mn 

Ih, - 9:45 A.M. 
Hon of IMn^* 10(50 A^ 
tarier, YoMfc, ft A^ 
mtimUf-MOfM. 
HoweflMiiliilfciM • 7:00 PJL 



VH^ 7:30 rjL 



ROCKCNURCH 

640Kempii^iU. Ph. 499-3727 

Vl^ua Beach 

Sunday 

Sundiy Schaol t:4f A.M. 

Morntng Warililp n;N A.M. 

Evdilna Worikip ;:M P.M. 

Tutiday 

Morning Worship \»:M A.M. 

Bvonlnt Worship 7:N P.M. 

Tliwsday 

Momlnt Worship IC:M A.M. 

Evoninf Worship 1:» P.M. 

Norsory AyaMaWa 
PASTORS 



Rav. John eimanoi 



Rcy:Aiineini*mi 



FIRSTCNURCH 
OF CHRIST 
SCICNTIST 
Virflinia Beach 
1341 Latkin Rd. 
Sunday 
Chnrch Sarvica 11 :M AM 
Sunday School 11 :M AM 
Wodmsday 

Testimony MoatiiK t:M 
PM 

Christian Sciantist 

Readinf Room 

(samt addrats as abova),- 

Msnday thru Saturday 

11:Mamtal:MPM 

Also Open Tuesday Evening 

7:MPMtO*:eePM 

Everyeno l« wotcomt to 
Study, Borrow, or Buy 
Authorized Christian 
SclMtist Litoratwro and the 
KMf Jama* Version of Ma 
Bthlo. 



Christian Scientist 
la olM availoMo. 



Monitor 



IB. 



Assembly of. God 

(CMBefVa. Beach Bhrd. 

Oceana Bhrd.) 

S.Beil^ Pastor 

428-5297 



QOHANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 
4750 Baxter Rd.-Va. Beach 
l^stor: W, F. (kandstaff 
Phom: 497-4208 

Sunday School: 9:45 A.M. 

(AIAges) 
Pnachiiv Service: 11:00 A.M. 
Eventi^ Pieachiag: 7:00 P.M. 

WteteMdqr 7:30 P.M. 
Pk^ifABiUeStody 
Varif4 Youtti AclMliea 



WEICOME TO WORSHIP 
ANDWrmEKWIIH 

ST. MARK A.M.E. 
CHURCH 

J. Alton Butts, MinMe • 
Tottim Bd. • Vktfnia B^ch, 
Va. Stady Mom 428-1330 
OiiBi^ School -9:30 A.M. 
IMvIm Wcn^^i - U :00 A.M. 
WMtaeaday • 7:00 P.M. 
Tte TsB^^ MWstty 
VoteM^ • B'.m tM. 
The (%ivek at taym 



alternative in the ministry? 

"I believe that the practice oi 
psychotherapy is a valid fwm of 
ministry," Price declared, 
ex{riaintng that while some 
traditional forms of ministry 
are still meaningful and 
dfective, others thatwere once 
taken for granted as essential 
"now seem to be worn out." 

Forexample, he said, consider 
the minister's "persona," his 
"mask or professional facade" 
consisting of the clerical collar, 
the smile and handshake, "the 
humility, the selflessness," the 
low pay, the need to be 
constantly on call and "the 
jargon and cliches." 

AS PART OF THIS tradition, 
he said, one must include also 
the church activities in which 
the minister is caught up 
potluck suppers, sewing circles, 
scout troops, altar guilds, 
hymn-sings, organ music, 
sermons and every-member 
canvasses. 



"There are the popularized 
theology with its dead symbols, 
overused words not understood, 
seasons of the 'church year, 
abstract and philosophical 
debates," Price observed, 

"A great many people in our 
society today, both Inside and 
outside the church, have 



rejected these sigas of the 
church's ministry as not 
credible. The churches that 
cling to outmoded forms of 
ministry and frown upon new 
forms seem to be irrelevant.",) 
Enter pastoral counseling as 
a "credible alternative" in the 
ministry. 







Note About This Auction: Iran, the largest producer of handwoven carpets and 
rugs, has been a backward, slow -moving country for centuries. Suddenly with the 
advent of Industry, oil and free education, it zoomed to the 20th Century. 
As a result children, 75 per cent of rug weavers, are lured awav from the ancient 
art of weaving. And in our opinion, in the next five years this great art will be so 
scarce and will be hard to find. European collertors and dealers are rushing to 
America and collect these carpets. We urge the residents of Virginia Beach to 
attend this fabulous auction. 

AUCTION 

of 

PERSIAN RUGS 

AHD OTHER Oriental Kug§ 

VIRGINIA BEACH CIVIC CENTER 

(Meeting Room) 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 6 • 2 P.M. 

Viewing & Inspection from 12 noon until auction 

Included are: LUXURY KERAAAN, KASHAN, PALACE QUMES, BOKHAHAS, 
HUNTING CARPETS, VASE AND GARDEN OF FLOWERS CARPETS, 
PRAYER RUGS, 8EL0UCHESTAN, SAROUKS, SILK RUGS, and many Others., 

LuKury Kermon (the soft wootof the chest part of the young Perslaa Lamb Is 
used), Qume SiMi (silk obtained by cultivating the silk worm on the leaven af »h« 
Mulberry tree); Tabriz (it vi^as here that the beautiful hunting carpets were 
woven), Ardebll (Medallion & Geometric designs a famous example is the 
Ardebil carpet in the Victoria and Albert Museum In London); Prayer Rug (they 
are recognized from MlhrabI). 




Auctlonaer; Prof. Oberbl 



Ames & Webb 
Inc. 




PRINCESS ANNE 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 

504 S. Allilltary Hwy. 

Virgihto Beach. Va. 

Phona 420 -1840 

Quality 

jphnPeef Equlpmant 



ASPHALT 

ROADS 

& 

MATERIALS 

Phone • 497-3591 



i 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonney Road 
Plione - 340-1161 



B# 



BANK' 

OF VIRGINIA BEACH >^^' 

Office^ Thro^j^out Virginia Beach 

425-5077 
First in Free Checking 
First in Saturday Stinking 



THERE IS A 
DIFFFRBNCE 

TRY 

Beach Fort/ 



TIDEWATER 
STEEL INC. 

5827 Curlew Dr. 
Norfolk, Va. 



SEASIDE 
PRESS 

5051 Holland Drive 

Va. Beach 
Phone - 497-8126 



DAIIIIBS, INC. 

$102 rilNCiSS ANNI ROAD 
VIRGINIA liACH, VA. 23462 



PHONE 497-3518 




^^mm^fm 



Page B-4-The Sun-Wednesday. April 3. 1974 




Avery 

complex 

operation 



ByUiUkt^ 



One of the ^ey operations in the Atlantic Fleet 
Amphibious Force is the Landing Force Training 
Command <LFTC) at Little Creek where am- 
I^iibious warfare training is conducted. Training is 
geared to place primary emphasis on landing force 
operations and preparing men to cross a contested 
beach. 

Under the direction of Brig. Gen. H.E. Spieknan, 
USMC, LFTC offers 20 formal courses in all phases 
of amphibious operations, including tactics, 
techniques and doctrines. Courses span from 
embarkation and ship-to-shore movements to the 
actual assault and seizure of objectives ashore. 
Students come from throughout the Marine Corps, 
Army and other service branches of the United 
States, as well as the armed forces of allied nations. 

"The most important part of ouf equation," Gen. 
Spielman contends, "are the people involved. No 
matter how modern the equipment might be, if the 
people are not qualified or motivated we become 
handicapped." 

GEN. SPILEMAN added, "We've noticed im- 
provement in the quality of our students, both in 
their ability to learn and their motivation to serve." 

Two unusual courses are offered Navy and Army 
units. Each Navy ship has an organized landing 
party to provide local security and conduct limited 
ground operations ashore. LFTC provides a two- 
week course to prepare these sailors for their 
duties. A rubber boat indoctrination course is 
conducted, primarily for Army units, that trains 
units for clandestine entry onto a hostile shore. 
Most of LFTC's courses are adaptable for 
presentation by Mobile Training Teams. These 
teams have traveled to some 35 locations from 
Puerto Rico to Chicago. 

Gen. Spielman points out, "Over the years our 
training has been revised to reflect advances in 
ships and troop embarkation. We are very busy 
right now in a training program for the Helicopter 
Assault Ship (LHA)." He added the amphibious 
forces began to employ "helos" in the late 1940s and 
began to think of methods in which ships could use 
them. 

THE LFTC celebrated its 28th anniversary 
Monday. It was activated April 1. 1946 under the 
command of Maj. Gen. Lemuel G. Shei*erd, who 
later became Commandant of the U.S. Marine 
Corps. Today the command is under the ad- 
ministrative control of the Marine Corps Com- 
mandant but operationally under the Commander 
Am[4iibious Force, Atlantic, also at Little Creek. 

In 1948 the command's mission was expanded to 
include amj^ibious training for units and officers 
of the Organized Marine Corps Reserve. In the 
summer of 1973, more than 1,100 citizen'Marines 
passed through Little Creek for amphibious in- 
doctrination. This year, 2,350 Marine Reservists 
are scheduled at Little Creek. 

As an example of the magnitude of the com- 
mand's training program, LFTC has trained over 
20,500 students since 1969. Some 4,900 are expected 
during this year with over 5,500 students projected 
for training at LFTC during 1975. 



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t|a|« 


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Solution to puzzle 
on p. A-4 



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no EDOQCD ElIDBE] 



DODID E3DOD 

RDB 0G0Eii3 mm 

COE DDOOG OQD 



^^^^^^^^^^^W^^^^^^^N^^^M^^WMMMM^iMN^^^M^^N^MWM^^MMWW^^^^M^^^^^^^^MWMMM^^MWMMii 



NJROTC 
in review 

Local high school Navy 
Junior ROTC (NJROTC) units 
will compete for special awanb 
April 18 when they participate 
in a military review at the 
Naval Amplubiaug Base, Little 
Creek. 

The high schod units' will be 
inspected by the MaFme>Corp» 
Landi|ig Force Training 
Command, pass in review 
before military officials and 
compete in precision drill team 
contests. 

Dr. E.E. Brickell, school 
superintent. will present the 
Capt. C.E. Caton award for 
excellence to the unit winning 
the overall competition. 

Individual award will also be 
given to outstanding cadets by 
the Military Order of the World 
Wars. Daughters of the 
American Revolution. 
American Legion and National 
Sojourners. 

In case of rain, the 
competition will be re- 
scheduled April 23. 



PARKNTSTOMEET 

The First Colonial High 
School Parents League will hold 
"Achievement Night" at 7:30 
p.m. Tuesday at the school, 1272 
First Colonial Road. Displays of 
projects and programs working 
or completed so far this year 
will be available for viewing. 



[ 



LHliALS 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 1st DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 

In Chancery 

No. C74-413 
In re: Adoption of Daniel 
Scott Merchant 
By: Samuel Clair Button & 
Karen Jean Button, 
Petitioners 

To: Steven t Kacvlnsky 
Route NO. 3 
Ashland, Wisconsin 54806 

ORDER 

Thi"^^ day came Sanuel Clair 
Button and Karen Jean 
Button, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of 
this proceeding is to effect 
the adoption of the above 
named Infant, Daniel Scott 
Merchant, by Samuel Clair 
Button and Karen Jean 
Button, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Steven J. 
Kacvinsky, a natural parent 
of said child, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: Route 
No. 3, Ashland, Wisconsin 
54806. 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said Steven J. Kacvinsky 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after ' 
publication of this Order and 
indicate his attitude toward 
the proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D.C. 

Herbert Si Bohannon 
Plaza One 
Norfolk, VA 

4-3,10,17,24-4t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 1st 
day of April, 1974. 
M^ry Wade Hosley, Plaintiff, 
against 
Alfred O. Hosley, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The obiect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be Mter merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 




CEDAR WOOD 

HAMPTON'S 
PINEWOOD GARDENS 
GATEWOOD PARK 
U^KIN VILLAGE 
EASTWOOD VILLA 
BELLAMY MANOR 

L & J GARDENS 
WOODHUR8T 
COUNTY VIEW 
niAILER PARK 



NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
ANDGIRLS 

MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
If |0u would like to tarn extra ,^ 
tioney and live in any of the 
areas listed below, call 
486-3430, Mondai thru Fridiy 

THES^ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARtMEEDED 

GARDENWOOD PARK 
CARDINAI. ESTATES 
^th STREET AREA 
WASHINGTON SQUARE 
ARROWHEAD 
HARBOR POINT 

WEBLIN PLACE 
CAROLANNE FARMS 

AVALON HILLS 
CHANTICLEAR APTS. 
LAKE EDWARD 
GREAT NECK MANOR 



t^magp^&mrfmrUr^^fmtmxtmmonmYti^nowl 



Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And »n affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office adck'est 
being: 161 North Arlingron 
Avenue, Apartment 29, East 
Orange, New Jersey 07018. 

It' is ordered Ihat he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days j^«i>tiue publication 
Iwr^^fed do what may be 
nec TjMi y to protect his 
interW in- ttiis suit. 

JOHN^ V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove 0. 
..ClerjL .V 

Owen, Guy, Rhodes Si Bet2 
525 Pembroke One 
Virginia Beach, VA 

4-3,10,17,24-4t 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Board 
oi Zoning Appeals will 
conduct a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, April 16, 1974, at 
5:00 P.M. in the Building 
inspector's Office, City Hall, 
Virginia Beich, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda. 

1. Hado Development 
Corporation requests a 
variance of 15 feel to a 20 foot 
setback on tx>th sides of a 
proposed 50 foot right of way 
instead of 35 feet as required 
of Lot 36, Oceana Gardens, 
Virginia Beach Boulevard 
(approximately 404 feel east 
of Gary Street), Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

2. Dr. E. H. weitzen by 
Lindal Cedar Homes 
requests a variance of 20 feet 
tea 30 foot front yard setback 
instead of SO feet as required 
ol Lot 20, BJock O, Section 3, 
Sandbridge, 3676 Sandfiddler 
Roar). Pungo Borough. 

3. L. D. Finley, Jr. by Wylie 
R. Cooke, Jr. requests a 
variance of 11 feet to a 9 foot 
from yard setback instead of 
20 feet as required of Lots 262 . 
through 270, North Hollies, 
west end off 15 foot lane 
between 49th Street and 50th 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 



W. L. Towers 
Secretary 



4-3,10-21 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City «f 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, April 22, 1974, 
at 2:00 P.M. at which time 
the following application 
will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIF- 
ICATIONS: 

KEMPSVILE BOROUGH 

1. Petition by resolution 
of the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from O- 
1 Office District to B-1 
Business - Residential Dis- 
iFicton certain property be- 
ginning at a point 665 feet 
North of Narragansett 
Drive, running a distance of 
520.03 feet along the East 
side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 305.08 
feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 400.60 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 
233 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.465 acres. 
(Pocahontas Village Area). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

2. Petition by Resolution 
of the Council of ttie City of 
Virginia Beach for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from H- 

1 Hotel District to B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
located on the South side m 
Shore Drive, beginning at a 
point 300 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 240 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property lines, running a 
distance of 150 feet more or 
less along ttie Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 240 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.83 acre more or 
less. (Lake Shores-Little 
Creek Amphibious Base 
Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition by Resolution 
of the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from B- 

2 Community Business 
District to H-1 Hotel 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of 
Shore Drive, beginning at a 
point 450 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 150 feet more or 
less along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 260 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 150 feet more or 
less along ttie Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 267.34 feet more 
or less along tbe Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.91 acre more or 
less. (Lake Shores-Little 
Creek Amptilblous Base 
Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

4. Petition by RcsoluflOD 
of the Council of tfie City of 
Virginia Beach for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from R- 

3 Residential District to B-2 
Community Business 
DIsfrlcf on certain property 
located on the South side of 
Shore Drive, beginning at a 
point 730 feet more w less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running • 
distance of 865 feet more » 
less along the Northern 
property line of which SO 
feet mwe or less is the 
South Sid* of Shore Drive, 
runnliv a distMice of 370 
!•«( mora or Ian along the 
Western proMcty fine, 
running a distance ^ TtS 



ftet more or loss alonfp ttie 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 395 
feet more or less along ttie 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 0.93 acre 
more or less. (Lake SltOres- 
Littie Creek Amphibious 
Base Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

5. Petition of Elizabeth 
Williams Everett by 
George Darden, Attorney, 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIf 
FICATION from R- 
4 Residential District to A-2 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 633.61 feet West of 
Birdneck Road and 117 feet 
East of Mockingburd Drive 
and 50 feet North of 
Waterfront Drive, running 
a distance of 110 feet along 
the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 372.16 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 110 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
365 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1 acre more or 
less. (Birdneck Acres- 
Watergate Apartments 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

6. Petition of C. Ray 
Scroggs, Delma W. 
Scroggs, Ronald D. 
Morrison and Anna J. 
Morrison for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B- 
2 Community Business 
District to 1-1 Light 
Industrial District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 387.05 feet East of 
Hutton Lane and 212 feet 
North of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 481.66 feet along 
the Western property line to 
Oconee Avenue, running a 
distance of 234.78 feet along 
the South side of Oconee 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 412.54 feet along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contans 2.309 acres 
and Is known as a portion of 
Site 9, Plat of Oconee Park. 
(Oconee Park-London 
Bridge Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMITS: 

PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

7. Application of James 
G. and Marilou Kollar for a 
CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT to operate an 
animal hospital and clinic 
on certain property located 
on the North side of Holland 
Road beginning at a point 
3700 feet more or less North 
of Princess Road, running a 
distance of 109.74 feet along 
the North side of Holland 
Road, running a distance of 
1237,87 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 334.61 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 957.64 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 4.7 
acres. (Kellam High School 
Area), princess anne 
BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

8. Application of O- 
8> M Marina for a 
CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT to operate a 
marina and related 
facilities on certain 
property located West of 
the intersection of 
Lynnhaven Avenue and 
Vista Circle, running a 
distance of 531 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 189.68 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 430 
feet more or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 175 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel is known as Lots 1 
through 8 inclusive, Block 
23, Plat of Lynnhaven 
Shore, and contains 2 acres 
more or less. (Lesner 
Bridge Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENT: 

9. Motion Of the 
Planning Comniission of 
the City of Virginia Beach 
the City of Virginia 
Beach to amend the 
Comprehensive Zoning 
Aprlcultural District, 
Section 401 (c) Conditional 
uses and structures, to 
Include "Lodges for 
fraternal organizations". 

Richard J. Webbon, 
City Clerk 

4?, 10, 2T 

NOTICE 

This is to notify the public 
that the undersigned, 
tradingasCHIX-DlX-DS. D 
will within ten days after 
publication of this notice 
apply to the Virginia State 
Alcoiioiic Beverage Control 
Board for a license to sell 
mixed beverages for off 
premises consumption. 

Lewis S. Dickens, Owner 
TA CHIX-DIX-D & D 
702 Atlantic ave. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 

B.J. Laseter 
Witness 



4-3, IT 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH on the 
26th day of March, 1974 
COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 
Petitioner, 

TRUSTEES OF THE 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH ■ SOUTH, 

and 

THE VIRGINIA ANNUAL 

CONFERENCE OF THE 

UNITED METHODIST 

CHURCH, 

AND 

TO WHOM IT MAY 

CONCERN.- 

LAW NO. 
L-169A 

and all parsons and classes 
ef partens, (their heirs, 
devisees, etc.) whether 
their names are known or 
unknown, awning or having 
an mtarast mafato to tha 
lands cr^petHMy wwhw or 
havkw 4o«« iWrt, twm, 
Mtata, or claim to aria «» 



land or any part ther^eof, or 
to the procawfs arising 
under the condemnation of 
the hereinafter, described 
lands, and all other persons 
whomsoever, whose 
property or propertifs will 
or mights be damaged by 
the taking of the herein 
described lands whose 
names are unknown, and 
who »r» proceeded against 
by the general description 
of "Unknown Owners", and 
0.916 acres, more or less, of 
land In the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 
Defendants. 

ORDIROF 
PUBLICATION 

In this suit. Petitioner 
seeks to acquire, by 
condemnation, for Its uses, 
4! ^ and for use as a public park 
and for public park 
purposes, a fee simple title 
to one parcel consisting of 
0.916 acres of land, more or 
less, situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
and described as follows: 

PARCEL 120 

Ail that certain piece or 
parcel of land, plus ail 
buildings, improvements, 
appurtenances and riparian 
rights thereunto 
appertaining, situated, 
lying and being In Pungo 
Borough, City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and 
designated as Parcel 120 on 
a certain plat entitled 
"Sheet Five Survey 
Showing Certain Properties 
Lying South of Frank 
Batten Property for the 
Department of 
Conservation and 
Economic Development, 
Division of Parks - Ben H. 
Boien, Commissioner 
Pungo Borough - Virginia 
Beach, Virginia Scale: 1" 
equals 200 ' March, 1972 
Marsh and Basgier 
Consulting Engineers - 
Surveyors, 101 N, Plaza 
Trail, in the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia ' Beach, 
Virginia, in Map Book 94 at 
Page 47, reference to said 
plat being made for a more 
particular description of 
the property referred to 
herein; said property 
containing 0.916 acres, 
more or less. 

And it appearing by 
affidavit filed according to 
law that the following 
owner cannot be personally 
served because after 
diligent inquiry within this 
State his place of residence 
cannot be ascertained, or. If 
ascertained, he is not within 
this State: 

TRUSTEES of the 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH -SOUTH 

And it appearing from the 
Petition filed herein that 
there are or may be persons 
interested in the subject 
matter of this suit whose 
names are unknown; and 
whereas said Petition 
makes such persons 
defendants by the general 
description of "Unknown 
Owners;" and an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that such parties are 
unknown. 

It is ORDER EDthat the 
aforesaid owners and 
"Unknown Owners" as well 
as all persons and classes of 
' persons owning or claiming 
any right, title, estate' or 
interest in or to such lands 
or any part of same,- or in 
the proceeds arising upon a 
condemnation thereof, do 
appear within ten (10) days 
after the publication of 
theis Order in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
df the City of Virginia 
Beach and do what Is 
necessary to protect their 
interests. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published In 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper having a 
general circulation in 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
once a week for two 
consecutive weeks. 

It Is further ORDERED 
that the Clerk of this Court 
post or cause to be posted a 
true copy of this Order on 
the front door of the 
courthouse or at the usual 
'"^posting place for legal 
notices within ten (10) days 
after the entry of this 
Order. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the Clerk of this Court 
shall mall a copy of the 
notice by publication 
referred to in S25-46.10 of 
the Code of Virginia to any 
owner who cannot be 
personally served but 
wlwse place of residence is 
then known; and the Clerk 
shall thereafter certify to 
this Court that said notices 
have been mailed, as 
required by law. 

I ask for this: 
Joseph A. Gawrys 
Counsel for Petitioner 

4-3, 10, 2T 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, CLERK 
Doris S. Hale, D.C. . 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

CITY OF . 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

The following abandoned 
vehicles were removed 
from the streets of the City 
of Virginia Beach: 

1960, Brown Chevrolet 
Station Wagon, 
Identification Number 
Removed. 

1963, White Rambler 
Station Wagon, 
Identification Number 
Removed. 

These vehicles have been 
removed to Wilson's Auto 
Service, 635 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 23451. The owner 
or any person having 
security Interest may claim 
this vehicle within three (3) 
weeks of the date of this 
notice by paying ail towing, 
IN-atervation, and storage 
charges. Failure by the 
owner or persons having 
security Interest to exercise 
their right to raclalm the 
vehicle within the time 
provided shall be deemed a 
waiver and shall be 
construed as consent to the 
sale of the abandoned 
motor vehicle at a public 
auction. 

W. W. Davis, Colmiel 
Chief of Police 

H. C. Terry, Captain 
^mmandlnfl Ottlcw 
Traffic Bw^tf 

4-3-1t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on ths 
28th day of March, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Alberta Blllups Boyd, 
PlaintlH, t 

against 
Dallas Boyd, 
Defendant. 

Theobject of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of two year separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or in behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain in 
which county or corporation 
the defendant Is without 
effect, he last known post 
office address being: 5304 
Pandora Avenue, VIrgnIa 
Beach, Virginia 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Tidewater Legal Aid 

Society 

700 Duke Street 

Norfolk, Virginia / 

' 4-3, 10, 17, 34, 4T 



Commonwealth of Viralnia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 27th 
day of March, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Willia Earl Gray, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Phyllis Jean Sadler Gray, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
408 Oak Street, Roanoke 
Rapids, North Carolina 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESSs 
CLERK ' 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Gerald J. Burlage 
2410 E. Little Creek Rd. 
Norfolk, VA 

4 3, 10, 17,24, 4T 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 29th OF 
March 1974. 

INCHANCERY 
NO.C-74 386 

In re: Adoption of Carl 

Eugene Murray 

By: Russell Alan Elder 8. 

Edith Marie Wood Elder, 

Petitioners 

To: Roy David Murray, Jr. 

723 Redgate Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Russell 
Alan Elder and Edith Marie 
Wood Elder, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
obiect of this proceeding Is 
to effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Carl 
Eugene Murray, by Russell 
Alan Elder and Edith Marie 
Wood Elder, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Roy David Murray, Jr., a 
natural parent of said child, 
whereabouts is unknown, 
and that due diligence has 
been used by or In behalf of 
said petitioners to ascertain 
in which county or 
corporation the said natural 
parent is, without effect, 
the last known post office 
address being 723 Redgate 
Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 

It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said Roy David 
Murray, Jr. appear before 
this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of 
this Order and indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 

JANET B. BURT, 

Attorney for the Petitioners 

1369 Laskin Rc^d 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

23451 

43,10,17,24-4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
38th day of March, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Elaine Robinson Harper, 
Plaintiff, Si, 

against 

Thedford Harper, 
Defendant. 

The obiect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of Two Year 
Separatlw). 

An an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: 1805 
Willlowbridge Road, 
Apartment 911, Joilet, 
Illinois 

It Is ordel-ed that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hw-grove, D. C. 

fidawatar Legal Aid 
TWDvka S». 
N«r«Blk. VA 

4-a,W,l7,J4.4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 
the Ciorculf Court of tt^ 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 28th day of March, 1974. 

OROEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Grace Lambe Michels, 

Plaintiff, a. 

against 

Jeffrey Wood Michels 

Defendant. 

Theobjectof thissuit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or on behalf of the 
plaintiff to ascertain in 
which county or 

corporation the defendant 
is without effect; the last 
known post office address 
being: 4410 Holly Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va 23451 

It is ordered thft he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to orotect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Murphy, Bennett 8. 

BaSnight 

3330 Pacific Ave. 

Virginia Beach, VA 

43, 10, 17, 24, 4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
29th day of March, 1974. 
Genevieve H. Furst, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

.Maynard Joseph Furst, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The Obiect Of thissuit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii. from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 
» And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: c- 
o Kay Carment, Quarters 
F. Berry Dr., Mt. View, 
Calif. 94940. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof , and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: SANDRA HARGROVE 

D. Clerk. 

Grover C. Wright, Jr. 
3330 Pacific Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

4-3,10,17,24-4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the ctty 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
28th day of March, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Nanette Fay Allen Reedy, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Richard Allen Reedy, 

Defendant. 

. The obiect of thissuit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of cruelty 
tantamount to desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
711 Baker Street, Lansing, 
michigan. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary . to protect his 
interest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 



Tidewater Legal 
700 Duke St. 
Norfolk, VA. 



Aid 



4-3, 10, 17, 24, 4T 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLICHEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Plwining Commission will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, April 9, 1974, at 1 :00 
P.M. in the Council Cham- 
bers of the Administration 
Building, Princess Anne 
Courthouse, Virginia BeaCh, 
Virginia. The following 
applications will appear on 
the agenda: 

DEFERRED FOR 90 DAYS 
BY PLANNING COM- 
MISSION ON JANUARY 8, 
1974: 

1 . Petition of Colx) Cor- 
poration, a Virgjflia Cor- 
poration for a CHlWteE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-4 
Resort Commercial District 
to ,^2 Resort Hotel District 
on' certain property begin- 
ning at a point 123.72 feet 
East of Kleen Street and 
running a distance of 200.27 
feet along the North side of 
Shore Drive, .running a 
distance of 972 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 235 feet 
akHig the Northern property 
line of which 200 feet more or 
less is the mean low water 
line of Chesapeake Bay, 
running a distance of 972.21 
feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 4J acr^ more or 
less. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department 
of Planning. (Lynnhaven 
Beach Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

2. Petition of Fala Cor- 
poration, a Virginia Cor- 
poration, by Frank E. Butler, 
III, Attorriey, for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-4' 
Resort Commercial Business 
District to B-2 Commimity 
Business District on certafci 
property located at the 
Southwest corner of ^km^c 
Drive and Vista Circle, 
running a distance Of 443.7 
feet ah»g the South side e» 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance ctf iSSi feet ataM 
the Wast sMe of VIM Oral 
and ruimh^ a iMMnc* af 



■■i 



il 



LICALS 



J 



447. 19 feel along fhe Southern 
property line, and running a 
distance o< 1.85 teei along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel is triangular in shape 
and contains approximately 
0.50 acres in acrea. (Lesner 
Bridge Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
« 3, Petition of Fala Cor 
poratioo, a Virginia Cor 
poration, by Frank E. Butler, 
III, Attorney, for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
GUASSIF I CATION from B-4 
Resort Commercial Business 
District to B 2 Community 
Business District <m certain 
property located on the 
Southeast corner of Shore 
Drive and Vista Circle, 
running a distance of 129.17 
feet along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 76.30 feet alonq 
the East side of Vista Circle, 
running a distance of 139.77 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 99.43 feet along 
the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel contains 0.27 
acres more or less. (Lesner 
Brit^eArea). LYNN HAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of Lake George 
Corporation, a Virginia 
Corporation, for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-4 
Resort Commercial District 
lo H 2 Reosrt Hotel District 
on certain property North of 
Shore Drive beginning at the 
Northern extremity of North 
Great Neck Road and run- 
ning a distance of 2715 feet 
along the Southern property 
line (North of Blocks 
A,B,C,D,E,F,G & H, Lynn- 
haven Beach), running a 
distance of 472 feet along tfie 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 2708.36 
feel along the Northern 
property line (Chesapeake 
Bay AAean Low Water Line), 
running a distance of 458 teet 
along the Eastern property 
line. Said parcel contains 
31.940 acreas. (Lynnhaven 
Beach Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 60 DAYS 
BY PLANNING COM- 
MISSION ON FEBRUARY 
12, 1974: 

5. Petition of A. 1. Wood by 
Grover C. Wright, Jr., 
Attorney, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District (for- 
merly R 2) to A-4 Apartment 
District (formerly R-3) on 
certain property located at 
the Northwest corner of 
Baltic Avenue and ?5th 
Street, running a distance of 
140 feet along the West side of 
Baltic Avenue, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
North side of 25th Street, 
running a distance of 140 feet 
along the Western property 
lineand running adistanceof 
100 feet along 'he Northern 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lots 1, 3, and 5, 
Block 127, Virginia Beach 
Development Company, Map 
No. 6, and contain; 14,000 
square feel. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

6. Petition of Eleanor H.and 
Neill McRae, Jr., for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 

*' DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from R-8 Residential 
District to Ol Office District 
on certain prdt^rty located 
on the Southwest corner of 
South Lynnhaven Road and 
Ansol Lane, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
West side of South Lynn- 
haven Road, running a 
distance of 150 feet along the 
South side of Ansol Lane, 
running a distance of 100 feet 
along the Western property 
line and running a distance of 
150 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lots 1 and 2, Block 

7. Plat of Lynnhaven Village 
and contains 15,000 square 
leet. (Lynnhaven Village 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

certain property beginning at 
a point 723.7 feet East of 
Birdneck Road, running a 
distance of 541.75 feet along 
the Southern property line of 
»»hich 218.52 feet is the North 
, side of Chinquapin Tra<l, 
running a distance of 219.78 
feet along the Eastern 
property line (186.02 feet 
South of Laskin Road), 
running a distance of 561.83 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 309 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 2.822 acres. 
(Birdneck Village Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

8. Petition of A.Gordon 
Stephenson and Elizabeth S. 
Sills by Grover C. Wright, 
Attorney, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICIATION from R-6 
Residential District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Northwest corner of 
Hilltop Road (Linkhorn 
Drive) and Pacific Avenue, 
running a distgp^ of 412.41 
feet along t<%W«t side of 

c|«8clf1c Avenue, running a 
disianci of 41 #8 feet along 
the North pide of Hilltop 
Road (Linkhorn Drive) 
running a distance of 185.66 
feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 173.11 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 70,316 
square feet. (Princess Anne 
Country Club Area). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

9. Application ^ Of T.G. 
Chrlstopolous for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of the porttor« 
of Potomac Street, Claveland 
Street, Lafayette Street, 
Fifth Street, Sixth Street as 
shown on a plat entitled 
"Sunnybro<*, Princess Anne 
County, Virginia own^ by 
Sunny Bro<*, inc." dated 
December 1916 referred to as 

J Plat A and a plat entitled 
"Property Dedication for 
Columbus Street" dated 
Nftvembtr U. 1971 refwred 
to as Plat B. 
jj Parcel 1 : f»otomac Street— 

That section rf Potomac 
Street beginning at the Mst 
side of Fourth Street, as 
shown an Plat A, and ex 
twMllng w«fw«rdly to the 
west side of relocated 
Columbus Stnet, as shown 
on Plat B, now called 
Columb«a Street. 

Parcel 2: Cleveland 
Street— That s#ctlon of 
Clevwiand Sfratt b«i»»*Kl 
at tl*a wMt *m tf Lot I, 
■teat 40, M Mewn on Ptot A, 
and aufwidlno •mMmtAv to 
Wm mm M» ei nMoM 
ClMmm Sirw». a ' 



Parcel 3: Lafayette 
Street— That section of 
Lafayette Street beginning at 
the east side of 4th Street as 
shown on Plat A, and ex- 
tending westwardly to the 
west side of relocated 
Columbus Street, as shown 
on Plat B. 

Parcel 4: Fifth Sh-eet- 
That section of Fifth Street 
t}eginning at the south side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard as 
shown on Plat A and B and 
extending southwardly to the 
north side of Relocated 
Columbus Street as shown on 
Plats A and B. 

Parcel 5: Sixth Street— 
That secticm of Sixth Street 
beginning at the south side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard as 
shown on Plat A and B ex- 
tending southwardly to the 
north side of Potomac Street, 
as shown on Plat A and B. 

Parcel 6: Sixth Street— 
That section of Sixth Street 
beginning at the south side of 
Potomac Street, as shown on 
Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly to the north side 
of Cleveland Street as shown 
on Plats A and B. 

Parcel 7: Sixth Street- 
Thai section of Sixth Street 
begMning at the south side of 
Cleveland Street, as shown 
on Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly to the north side 
of Columbus Street as shnyVn 
on Plats A and B. 

Parcel 8: Sixth Street— 
That section of Sixth Street 
beginning at the south side of 
Columbus Street, as shown 
on Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly to the north side 
of Lafayette Street, as shown 
on Plat A. 

Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Pembroke Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
DEFERRED FOR 30 DAYS 
BY PLANNING COM- 
MISSION ON MARCH 12, 
1974: 

10. Petition of Clyde Absalom 
and Bonnie Be-Lo Markets, 
Inc., by Grover C. Wright, 
Jr., Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-8 Residential District 
to B-2 Community Business 
District on certain piroperty 
beginning at a point 150 feet 
South of Shore Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 170.6 feet 
along the West side of Red 
Tide Road, running a 
distance of 300.94 feet along 

. the North side of Cape Henry 
Drive, running a distance of 
193.76 feet along the East side 
of Sea Shell Road, and 
running a distance of 300 feet 
along the Northern property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 7 through 14, Block M, 
Plat of Lynnhaven Beach. 
(Lynnhaven Colony Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 
Change of Zoning District 
Classifications 

11. Petition of Seneca 
Campsites, Inc., for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from AG-1 
Agricultural District to A-1 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the West side of Princess 
Anne Road beginning at a 
point 4600 feet more or less 
South of Public Landing 
Road, running a distance of 
772 feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 320 
feet is the West side o* 
Princess Anne Road, running 
a distance of 1524.54 feet 
along the Southern property 
line, running a distance of 
1149 feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 1302 feet along the 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 26.16 acres. 
(Munden Area). PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 

12. Petition Of The Southland 
Employees Trust for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-9 
Residential Townhouse 
District to B-2 Community 
Business District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
500 feet more or less Sooth of 
Silina Drive, running a 
distance of 217 feet more or 
less along the West side of 
South Lynnhaven Road, 

running a distance of 464.35 
feet along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 181.52 feet along 
the Western property line, 
and running a distance of 
341 .86 feet a long the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.96 acres nrwre or 
less. (Princess Anne Plaza 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

13. Petition of Ella L. 
Johnson for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-8 Residential District 
to 11 Light Industrial 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 558 feet 
East of North , Oceana 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 279 feet along the 
North side of Southern 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 780.1 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 279 feet 
along the Northern property 
line and running a distance of 
780.7 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel Is 
known as Lot 45, Plat of 
Oceana Gardens and con- 
tains 5 acres (©ceana 
Gardeni"^ Area). LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

14. Petition of Kenton B. 
Patrick for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-6 Residential District 
to 0-1 Office Disfrict on 
certain property located on 
the Southeast corner of South 
Palm Avenue and Bonney 
Road and 200 feet West of 
South Fir Avenue, running a 
distance of 227.55 feet along 
the Northern property line of 
v^hlch 177.55 feet Is the South 
side of Bonney Road, running 
a distance of 394.1 feet alortg 
the East side of South Palm 
Avenue, running a distMice 
of 513.35 feet along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcfl omtaire 1.9 acres. 
(Thalia Village Southern 
Firs Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

15. Petition of Prad O. and 
Hattie G. Holloway for a 
Change of Zonii^ District 
Classification from R-5 
Residential District to O-l 
Office District on certain 
pn^vrfy beginning at a point 
6S0 feet more w less West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
dlstwtce of 100 feet alwig the 
South side of t*)lland Road, 
running a distance of 226.89 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, rwining a 
distance of 100.97 feet along 
fhe Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
212.92 feet along the 
Western property line. SaW 
parcel Is known as Lot B, 
Subdivision of Tract Mi, 
AW. Comick and eontohw 
f s acre mor or lass'- 
(H^lanri Terrace-Larksptw 



Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

16. Petition of Ro'xrt and 
Mary Reid for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-5 Residential District 
to 0-1 Office District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 750 feet more or less 
West of Edwin Drive, run 
ning a distance of 100 feet 
along the South side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 212.92 feet along 
ttie Eastern pro|)erty lliw, 
running a distance of 100.97 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 198.96 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel is known as Lot 
C, Subdivision of Tract 43, 
A.W. Cornick and contains 
0.5 acre more or less. 
(Holland Terrace-Larkspur 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

17. Petition of Roy A. and 
Elvin D. Reid for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-5 Residential District 
to 0-1 Office District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 850 feet more or less 
West of Edwin Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 100 feet 
along the South side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 198.96 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 100.97 
feet along the Southern 
property tine and running a 
distance of 185 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel Is known as Lot D, 
Subdivisk>n of Tract 43, A.W. 
Cornick and contains 0.45 
acre more or less. (Holland 
Terrace-Larkspur Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

18. Petition of Cornell and 
Casandra Freeman for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-5 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
950 feet more or less West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distarKre of 110 feet along the 
South side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 185 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line, running a distance of 
111.07 feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 169.65 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Sa Idparcel Is knownas Lot E' 
Subdivision of Tract 43, A.W. 
Cornick and contains 0.45 
acre. (Holand Terrace 
Larkspur Areas). KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

19. Petition of Robert and 
Mildred O. Perry for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-5 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
1060 feet more or less West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 117 teef along the 
South side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 169.65 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, and running a 

distance of 117.71 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
162.8 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel Is 
known as Lot F, Subdivision 
of Tract 43, A W. Cornick 
and contains 0.45 acre 
more or less. (Holland 
Terrace-Larkspur Are^ 
as). KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

5b. Petition of Clarence L. 
and Elaine B. Waike for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-5 
Residential District to 01 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
1 177 feet more or less West of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 120 feet along the . 
South side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 162.8 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 120.16 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
168.91 feet along the Western 
preperty line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot G, Subdivision 
of Tract 43, A.W. Cornick and 
contains 0.45 acre. (Holland 
Terrace-Larkspur Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

21. Petition of Fenner V. 
Woolard, Jri for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-Tb Residential District 
to B-2 Community BusincfSs 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 350.18 
feet East of Kempsville 
Road, running a distance of 
467.11 feet along the Northern 
property line of which 292.11 
feet is the Sooth side of 
Indian River Road, running a 
distance of 552.76 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 227.06 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 599.48 feet ak>ng 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 2.726 
acres. (Bonney's Corner 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

22. Petition of Metro Center 
Associates for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from B-2 Community 
BusinessDistricttoO-1 Office 
District on certain pr<verty 
located In the Southwest 
quadrant of fhe Intersection 
of Centerville Turnpike and 
Indian River ftoad, running a 
distance of 483.66 feet along 
the South side of 1 ndian River 
Road, running a distance of 
190.54 feet along the West 
side of Centerville Turnpike, 
running a distance of 567.78 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 271.88 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 2.721 
acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department 

. of Planning. (College Park- 
Level Green Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

23. Petition Of AAeh-o Center 
Associates for a Change of 
Zoning District Classlficatton 
from HI Hotel District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property located In the 
Southwest quadrant of the 
intersection of Centerville 
Turnpike and Indian River 
Road beginning at a point 
19034 feet South of Indian 
River Road and running a 
distance of 950 feet n»ore or 
l«e atong the fMlh sWe <tf 
Centerville Turnpike, run- 
ning a distance of nO feet 
along the Western property 
line, running a distance of «0 
feet more w less along ttte 
Northern property, and 
running a distance of 5*7.7t 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
cwitalns 9.9 acres. Plats 
with mere detailed 
Information are available 
In fhe Department of 
Planning. (Crtl^e Park. 
Level Green Areas). 

KCMPSVILLC lOR- 
OUOH. 



24. Petitton of Metro Center 
Associates for a Cttange of 
Zoning District ClassH IcatkK) 
from B 2 Community 
Business District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located in the Southwest 
quadrant of the intersection 
of Centerville Turnpike and 
Indian River Road beginning 
at a point 1140 feet West of 
Indian River Road and 
running a distance of 565 feet 
more or less along fhe North 
side of Centerville turnpike 
runnUig a distance of 7S0 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a (^stance of 500 feet 
more or / less along the 

, Western prl>perty line. Said 
parcel Is triangular In shape 
and contains 2.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formatkm are available In 
the Oepartmeflt of Planning. 
(College Park-Lfcvel Green 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

25. Petition of /y^tro Center 
Associates for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from 1-1 Light Industrial 
District to B-2 Community 
Business District on certain 
property located) In the 
Southeast quadrant of the 
intersection of Centersvllle 
Turnpike and Indian River 
Road beginning at a point 190 
feet more or less South of 
Indian River Road, running a 
distance of 2443 feet along the 
South and East skies of 
Centerville Turnpike, run- 
ning a distance of 1389,33 feet 
along the Southern property 
line and running a distance of 
1840.42 feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel Is 
triangular in shape and 
contains 36.780 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(College Park-Level Green 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

Conditional Use Permits: 

26. Application of O 8i M 
Marina for a Conditkjnal Use 
Permit to operate a marina 
and related facilities on 
certain property located 
West of the intersection of 
Lynnhaven Avenue and Vista 
Circle, running a distance of 
531 feet more or less along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 189.68 
feet along the Eastern 
property liner, running a 
distance of 189.68 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 430 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 175 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel is known as Lots 1 
through 8 inclusive. Block 22, 
Plat of Lynnhaven Shores, 
and contains 2 acres more or 
less. (Lesner Bridge Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

27. Application of Seneca 
Campsites, Inc., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit to 
operate a mobile home park 
on certain property located 
on the West side of Princess 
Anne Road beginning at a 
point 4600 feet more or less 
.South of, Public Landing 

Road, running a distance of 
772 feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 320 
feef is the West side ol 
Princess Anne Road, running 
a distance of 1524.54 feet 
along the Southern property 
line, running a distance of 
1149 feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 1302 feet along ttte 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 26.16' acres 
(Munden Area). PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 
Street Closures: 

28. Application of F. Patrick 
Kavanaugh for the discon- 
tinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portton of 
Green Hill Road beginning at 
a point 1130 feet more or less 
North of River Road and 
extending from the Eastern 
boundary of Great Neck 
Road in an eastwardly 
direction a distance of 1440 
feet more or less. Said street 
is 80 feet more or less In 
width, containing 2.7 acres 
more or less. (Green Hill 
Farm Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

29. Application of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Department 
of Community Services, 4or 
the discontinuance, closure 
and abandonment of a 
portion of Providence Road 
located 317.5 feet West of the 
Intersection of Indian River 
Road OT the North side of Old 
Providence Road, running In 
a Westewardly direction a 
distance of 160 feet more or 
less. Said Parcel Is 21 feet 
more or less in width and 
contains 0.074 acre. (Barrettis 
Corner Area). KEMP- 
SVILLE BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed 
information on the above 
applications are available In 
the Department of Planning. 
All Interested persons are 
invited to attend. 

Charles C.Carrington 
Director of Planning 

3-27,4-3-2t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on ttie 22nd 
day of AAarch, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Gerald Franklin Wilkigson, 

Plaintiff, ^ 

against 

Delia Aguilar Wilkinson, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon Ifhe grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affkfavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office ad<^ess 
being: Tucson, ArlBHia. 

It is ordered ffiat she do 
appear her* writhin ten (10) • 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do wmat may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress; Clerfc 
Sandra Hargrove, D. Clerk. 

Henry L. Sadler, III 

210 Atlantic Natkmal Bank 

Bidg. 

Mrtolk, VA 



J,»,44,*W-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's (Mf Ice of the 
Circuit Coirt of the City of 
VlrgMe iMCh, on the 19th 
d^r^Mtarcfi, 1W4. 

w^inilff,' 
a^hwt 



Tassle May Gurganus, 
Defendant 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain d'mivwct a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of the parties having lived 
separate and apart for more 
than two (2) years. 

And an affidavit having 
bean made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by or 
inbehalf of the complainant 
lo ascertain in what county 
or corporation the defendant 
is without effect, the last 
known post office address 
belnd: Portsmouth, Virginia 

If is ordered thai she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. qurtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

James & Consolvo 3221 
Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
3-27,44,10,17— 4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the <Jlty of 
Virginia Beach on the 20th 
day of March, 1974 
Barbara Clyde Garrlngton 
Talbert, Plaintiff 
against 

Louis Herman Talbert, Jr., 
Defendant 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of continuous separation for 
more than two years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
riefendant is not a resident of 
the Stale of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Louis Herman 
Talbert, Jr., c-o Walter J. 
Ballesteros, 316 AAaln Street, 
Registerstown, Maryland 
21136 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove, D. 
Clerk 

Fine, Fine, Legum & Fine 720 
Law BIdg. Norfolk, Va. 

3-27;4-3,10,17,4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 20th 
day of March, 1974 
Sidney C. White, Plaintiff, 
against 

Barbara S. White, Defendant 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged^nto 
a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
ol desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: General Delivery, 
Chapmanville, West Virginia 
25506 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest In this suit. 
A copy-Teste: JOHN V, 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Bashara 8i Hubbard Board of 
Trade BIdg. Norfolk, VA. 

3-27,4-3,10,17,4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 22nd 
day of AAarch, 1974 
Sandra> J. Strickland, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Jackie Lee Strickland, 
Defendant 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged info 
a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
•being: 250-88-9569 XO'S Div- 
MAA USS AMERICA CVA 66 
FPO New York, N.Y. 09501 

II Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do wrtiat may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

''''^Mri R. Sadler 1600 E. 
Little Creek Rd, Norfolk, VA 
23518 <^ 
1-27,41,10,17,41 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of fhe tUy of 
Virginia Beach on the 22nd 
day (M AAarch, 1974 
Ralph Willis Jefferson. 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Evelyn Cleopatra Jefferson, 
Defendant 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of two year separatton. 

And an affidavit having 
been maM and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office MMkvss 
being: 232 N. Wh Street, €. 
Ormgc, New Jersey 07017 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publicatkHi 
hereof, and do wtiat may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy-Test: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: SMKira Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Mkirphy. Benn^ & B««)l^t 
3330 PacHic Ave. Virginia 
BMCh, VA 

vlrgMla; 

IN THE CLERK'S 

OFIMCTOFTMB 

CIRCUIT ONIRT OF 

TMICITVOF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 



* onthe210ay 
of March, 1974 

STATE HIGHWAY COM 
MISSIONER OF VIRGINIA, 
Petitioner, 
vs. 

GLADYS BROWN, 
4776 Bonney Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 
WILLIAM LEE BROWN, 
JR.. 

3134 Fairview Avenue, 
Chesapeake, Virginia; 
ROBERT C. BROWN, 
2324 Burger Street, 
Norfolk, Virgin^; 
JESSE B. BROWN, 
182 16 143rd Street, 
Springfield Garden, 
Long Island, New York; 
SYLVIA B. LAWRENCE, 
1258 Strand Street, 
Norfolk, Virginia; 
EILEEN M. BROWN, 
4776 Bonney Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 
PERCELL BROWN, 
2847 Elgin Avenue, . . 

BalHnMre, AAaryland; 
JEFFREY BROWN, a 
minor, 

MILTON BROWN, a minor, 
DONNELL BROWN, a 
minor, 

YVETTE L. BROWN, a 
minor, 

TONY BROWN, a minor, 
BETTY JEAN BROWN, a 
minor. 
Serve: 

Gerald J. Burlage, 
Guardian ad Litem, 
Plaza One Building, 
Norfolk, Vlrgii^ia; 
and 

0.254 Acre ol Land, near 
Powell's Corner, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 

Defendants. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

In this proceeding the 
Petitioner seeks to acquire 
by condemnation the fee 
simple title to a certain 
parcel of land containing 
0.254 acre, and known as 4776 
Bonney Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, which 
property is to be used for the 
improvement of a section of 
the Independence Boulevard 
Interchange on the Norfolk 
Virginia Beach Expressway 
(State Highway Route No. 
44), the nature of such im 
provement being more 
particularly described in the 
petition and exhibits at- 
tached thereto on file in the 
office of the clerk of this 
court, to which reference is 
hereby made for a full and 
accurate description thereof; 
and for the appointment of 
commissioners to ascertain 
just compensation to the 
owners of any estate or in 
terest in the property to be 
taken or affected as a result 
ol the taking and use thereof 
by the petitioner. 

For such purposes, the 
petitioner will apply to the 
couri, silting at Princess 
Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 16th 
nay of April, 1974 at 9:30 
o'clock a.m., or as soon 
'hereafter as counsel may be 
heard, for the appointment of 
commissioners to ascertain 
just compensation as 
aforesaid, and 'o obtain a 
date for the trial of the issue 
nf just compensation. 

And M appearing by at 
lidavit filed according lo law 
that the following owners are 
not residents of the Slate of 
Virginia: Jesse B. Brown 182- 
16 143rd Street, Springfield 
Garden, Long Island, New 
York 11101, and Percell 
Brown, 2847 Elgin Avenue, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21216; 
it Is ORDERED .that the 
aforesaid owners do appear 
within ten (10) days after due 
publication of this order in 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and do \Uiat Is necessary to 
protect their interest; and it 
Is FURTHER ORDERED 
that If any of the above 
Named owners wishes to 
assert any objection or 
defense to the taking or 
damaging of his property or 
to the jurisdiction of the court 
to hear the case and to 
proceed with the ap- 
pointment of commissioners 
he shall file his answer and 
grounds of defense 
desianatinq the property 
In which he claims to be in- 
terested, the grounds of any 
obiecth>n or defense to the 
taking or damaging of his 
property or to the jurlsdic 
tion of the court to hear the 
case and to proceed with the 
appointment of com- 
missioners for the deter 
mination of just com 
pensation. 

Stiould any such owner fail 
lo file his answer and 
grounds of defense as 
hereinabove provided, such 
failgre shall not preclude the 
owner from appearing on the 
date set for the appointment 
of commisstoners nor from 
presenting evidence as to 
valuatkm and damage nor 
from sharing in the award of 
justcompensatlon according 
lo his interest therein or 
otherwise protecting his 
rights, but such failure shall 
preclude such owner from 
other defense by way of pleas 
In bar, abatement or 
otherwise. 

KELLAAA, PICKRELL 8. 
LAWLER,p.q. 
(James M. Pickrell) 
1020 First 8i AA^chants Bank 
Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 23S10 

l-27,4-1.10,l7,4t 
*A Copy Teste: John Jt^j 
Fentress, Clerk 
By Gladys J. Conbag, DC. 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON THE 
21ST DAY OF MARCH, 1974 

In Chancery 

No. C 74-213 
FRANK E. BUTLER, ill, 
Executor, etc.. Complainant 
vs 

FRANCES ENDES EBELT, 
ET ALS, Defendants 

ORDCROF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit Is fo 
determine the manner of 
dislributkMi of the probate 
estate of Rosalind Russell 
Walton, deceMed. 

And Ml Affidavit having 
been made that Frances 
Endcs Ebeft, ail Andovar, S. 
E., Kentwood, Michigan, 
Martha Peters, 10440 
PoMrosa, El Pise, Texas, 
Dorothy Caldwell Palumbo, 
7401 Shore Ro«l, Apt. 1 C, 
Brooklyn, New York and 
VHMet Caldwell Wolfe, Route 
2, Box 209, Darlington, 
MM-yland are not resWwits 
of Mils Stale (Virginia) ««d 
the alfMavIt Htrttmr statktg 
liiai Mwr* are er may be 
pervans MtM^Mtvd Ni ffie 
Etfat* ef ItaaalHtd RwhMI 



The Sun—' 
unknown and said persohs 
having been joined in this 
cause as "Parlies 
Unknown". 

It is ORDERED that the 
defendants Frances Endes 
Ebell, Martha Peters, 
Dorothy Caldwell Palumbo, 
and Violet Caldwell Wolfe 
who are not residents of the 
Stale ol Virginia and the 
persons made defendant by 
the general description ol 
"Parties Unknown" do 
appear here within ten days 
after due poblicatioh of this 
Order and do what Is 
necessary to protect their 
interests. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published once 
a week tor tour successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun. 

A Copy Teste: John V, 
Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

I ASK FOR THIS;Frank E. 
Butler. Ill 

327,43.10.17.41 



NOTICE 

Virglna: 

The reoular meetino of the 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach will be held m tne 
Council Chambers of the 
Administration Building, 
City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station. Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, on AAonday, April 8, 
1974. at 2:00 P.M. al which 
time the following ap 
plications will be heard: 
Change of 
Zoning District 
Classifications; 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 
DEFERRED FOR 3 WEEKS 
BY CITY COUNCIL ON 
MARCH IB, 1974: 

1. Petition of John J, 
Woodard, AAary T. Woodard, 
Samuel I. While, Harriet 
While, James McGeein, 
Elaine McGeein, MIscha 
Ratal, Bevalan Ratal, 
Thelma J. Kayer, Philip 
Russo and AAary C. Russo for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA 
TION Irom B-1 Business 
Residential District to A-1 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 350 leet more or less 
North ol Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance ol 370.28 feet along 
ihe Western property line of 
which 220,08 feel is the East 
side of Plea'ure House Road, 
running a olstance ol 965.4 
leet along the Northern 
properly line, running a 
distance ol 770.81 feet along 
the Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 846.4 
leet along the* Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 10.7 acres more or 
less. (Robbins Corner Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

2. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission lo establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as the North and 
South sides ol North Witch 
duck Road East of Cathedral 
Drive, (a) running a distance 
lit 850 leet itiore or less along 
the South side ol North 
Witchduck Road, running a 
distance ol 400 feet along the 
Easlern property line of 
which 206 feet more or less Is 
the West side of .Donation 
Drive, running a distance of 
900 leet more or less along 
the Southern properly line, 
rurining a distance ol 190 feel 
more or less along the 
Western properly line (said 
parcel contains 4.9 acres 
more or less and excludes 
that portion of property 
located on the Southwest 
cornenl^l North Witchduck 
Road and Donation Drive 
containing 0.4 acre); (b) 
running a distance of 640 feet 
more or less along the North 
side of North Witchduck 
Road across from Cathedral 
Drive, running a distance of 
115 feel more or less along 
the Western property line, 
running a distance ol 610 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern properly line and 
running a distance of 140 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern profierty line (said 
parcel contains 1.83 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as OLD 
DONATION CHURCH 
located a* 4449 North Witch 
duck Road as an historical 
site deemed dislrable for 
preservation. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
(Donation Shores Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

3. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain properly 
described as located at the 
intersection «f Hinsdale 
Street and Constitution 
Avenue North of Jonathan 
Court, running a distance of 
350 leet more or less along 
fhe Northern property line 
and running a distance of 350 
feel more or less along the 
Southern property line (said 
parcel is irregular In shape) 
and to classify the property 
known as PEMBROKE 
MANOR as an historical site 
deemed desirable for 
preservation. Plats with 
more detailed informatk>n 
are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
(Pembroke Manor Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

4. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as located on the 
East side of Parish Road 
between Club Circle and 
Thoroughgood Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 500 feet 
along the East side of Parish 
Road, running a distance of 
390 feet along the South side 
of Thoroughgood Drive, 
running a distance of 480 feet 
atong the Eastern property 
line and running a distance of 
340 feet atong the Southern 
property line of which 240 
feet is the North side of Club 
Circle (said parcel contains 
3.48 acres more or less) and 
to classify the profwrty 
known as ADAM 
THOROUGHG<X>D HOUSE 
located at 1636 Parish Road 
as mn historical site (teemed 
desirM)ie for (reservation. 
Plats ¥vlth more detailed 
informatton are available in 
the D^artment of Planning. 
(Thoroughi^od Area). BAY 
SIDE BOROUGH. 

5. Petition by nrwtion of tt»e 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commlsston to establish wi 
Historic and Cuitwai District 
on certain ^eperfy 
described as begiHhkig 4 a 



Wednesday. April 3, 1974-Page B-5 
East of Donation Drive, 
running a distance ol 270 leet 
more or less alonq the South 
side ol Wishart Road, run 
ning a distance ol 660 leet 
more or less along the 
Easlern properly line, 
running a distance ol SO feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance ol 670 leet 
more or less alonq tho 
Western properly line (said 
parcel contains 2.9 acres 
more or less) and tc^classlty 
Ihe property known as the 
WISHART HOUSE located 
on Wishart Road as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable lor preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
inlormatlon are available in 
•he Department ol Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

6. Petition by motion ol the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission lo establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 432.69 feet more or less 
West of Sale Drive and 
rifnning a distance of 200 feet 
more or less along the West 
sideol South Crestline Drive, 
running a distance of 300 leet 
more or less along the 

«j Northern property line, 
running a distance ol 550 lee* 
more or less along the 
Western property line and 
running a distance ol 280 leel 
more or less along the 
Southern properly line (said 
parcel contains 2.2 acres 
more or less) and to classily 
Ihe property known as the 
THOMAS MURRAY HOUSE 
located at 3425 South Crest 
line Drive as an historical 
site deemed desirable for 
preservation. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available in the^ 
Department of Planning. 
(Elliabeth River Shores 
Area). KEMPSVILLE. 
BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

7. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property located 
on Ihe South side of Adam 
Keeling Road, beginning at a 
point 3700 feet more or lass 
West ol Great Neck Road, 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the South side of Adam 
Keeling Road, running a 
distance ol 235 leet more or 
les'< along the easlern 
property line, running a 
distance ol 280 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
properly line and running a 
distance of 325 leet more or 
less along the Western pro- 
perty line (said parcel 
contains 1.08 acres more or 
less) and to classify the 
properly known as ADAM 
KEELING HOUSE located 
at 3157 Adam Keeling Road 
as an historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available In 
the Department ol Planning. 
(Great Neck Point Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

8. Petition by motion ol the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission lo establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning al a 
point 2600 feel fnore or less 
West of Air Station Drive, 
and 430 feet more or less 
North of Pollers Drive, 
running a distance ol 890 feet 
more or less along Ihe 
Southern property line 
(Norfolk and Southern 
Railway Right ol Way), 
running a distance of 1220 
leet more or less along the 
Easlern property line, 
running a distance of 1250 
leel more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 1190 
feet more or less along the 
Western properly line (said 
parcel contains 30.25 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
Ihe property known as the 
UPPER WOLFSNARE 
HOUSE located at 2040 
Potters Road as an historical 
site deemed desirable for 
preservation, Plats with 
more detailed Information 
are available in the 
Departmeni ol Planning. 
(Oceana Naval Air Station 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

9. Petition of Laura M. 
Harness and Jessie O. 
Harness for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
(Property located al ihe 
Northwest corner of South 
Lynnhaven Road and Ansol 
Lane, running a distance ol 
150 leet along the Noi^h side 
ol Ansol Lane, running a 
distance of 145.43 leet along 
the West side ol South Lynn 
haven Road, running a 
distance of 160.83 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
203.46 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.6 acre. (Lynn- 
haven Village Area). LYNN 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 
Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 

1-27,4-1 It 



By J.M. Abbltrs D.C. 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Clrcuit^ourt of the City of 
Virginif ' Beach, on the 13th 
day of March, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Barbara A. Hines, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Ralph Hines, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vir>cuto 
matrimonii (rom the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of separation for more than 
t«vo years, to-wit: since April 
1, 1971. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant Is a non resident ot 
the Slate of Virginia, the last 
known post t^fice address 
oeing: 1228 Southern Avenue, 
S.E. No. 304, Wa^ington, 
DC. 

it is. ordered that he do 
appear h«-e withm ten (10) 
days aftw due publicatton 
herof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 

John V. Fentra», Clerk 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 

Ciwk 

Samuel Goldblan 

804 Plaza One 

Mrfelk, viivlnia 

iia.y 4a.»*T 



Cldssified 



Page B-6-TIm Sun-Wadnasday, April 3, 1974 



486-S4SO 



j:li 



L 



LiCALS 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
15th day of March, 1974. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Mary E. Hill, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Rondle G Hill, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Wte defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
1480 South 37th Street, Fort 
Pierce, Florida 33450.. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 



necessary to protect hit 
interest in this suit. 

-John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Outland & Gary 

p12 United Virginia Bank 

BIdg. * 

Norfolk, VA 

3 20, 27, 4 3, 10-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of theCity 
ofVirginia Beach, on the 
18th day of March, 1974. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Sheryll A. Romich, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

John A. Romich, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of constructive 
desertion, or desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a resi- 



SkopOHd 





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Off less and OaskSpac* IIA i 

industrial lOr Rant hb I 



REAL ESTATC FOR SALE 



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Ifeis-uvestockI 

<>••*, Cats, Ottiar Pats 47 

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m ANV or THE imovc classifications 

CMX4M-9430 



dent of the State of Virginia, 
the last known post -office 
address being: 412 Water 
Street, Belle Haven, North 
Carolina 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10> 
days after due publication 
herof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

William F. Burnside 
958 Laskin Rd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

3 20, 27, 4 3, 10-4T 
Connomwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
15th day of March, 1974 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Jerry Lee Davis, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Mary Elaine Davis, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address beino: 
4421 Alpine Street, Boise, 
Idaho 83705 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof , and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Moore, Brydges & Cohen 
2413 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

3-20,27, 4-3, 10-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
nth day of March, 1974. 
William Denny, Plaintiff, 
against 

Sandra Ann Thompson 
Denny, Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The oblect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro, later to be 
merged into an absolute 
divorce from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of Willful 
desertion. 

And an aHldavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
RD3, Box 227, JackSOn, 
New Jersey 98527. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest Iri this suit. 

A copy— Teste: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk. 

Smith, Power, & Owens p.c^. 
1412 Maritime Tower 
Norfolk, VA 

3 13,20,27,4-3 4t 



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Commonwealtti of Virginia, 
in the Clwk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
8th day of March, 1974, 
Mary Call Jolinson, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Sidney -Sanford Johnson, 
III, Defendant. 

ORDEROF 

PUBLICATION 

Theobleci Of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion for more than 
one year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
70 Bayberry \ Road, 
Levltown, New York 11756 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

A copy Teste: 

John V. Fentrws, Clerk 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 

Clerk 

Random W. Etherldge p.q. 

508 North Birdneck Road 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

3 13,20,27,4-3-41 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 5th DAY 
OF MARCH, 1974. 
In Chancery 
'No.C-73'13IO 
In re: Adoption of ROBIN 
LYNN DUNKLEY an 
infant 

By: Stuart Wilson Jones 
ahd Margaret Dunkley 
Jones, PETITIONERS 
To: Gerald Lester Dunkley 
411 South Laburnam Ave. 
Richmond, Va. 
» 
ORDER 

This day came Stuart 
Wilson Jones and 

Margaret Dunkley Jones, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Robin 
Lynn Dunkley, by Stuart 
Wilson Jones and Margaret 
Dunkley Jones, husband 
and wife, and affidavit 
having«been made and filed 
that Gerald Lester 
Dunkley, a natural parent 
of said child, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
411 South Laburnum 
Avenue, Richmond, 
Virginia. 

It is therfore ordered 
that the said Gerald 
Lester Dunkley appear 
before this Court within ten 
(10) days after publication 
of this Order and indicate 
his attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

ROBERT J. Smith, p.q. 
724 Mutual Building 
Richmond, Virginia 23219 
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buying, selling, renting, or 
offering a service. Up to 12 
words, only $1 per issue, 
add 50 cents for each 
additional 4 words. 

Classified display $2.52 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: 25 cents 
per line, minimum charge 
Of $2.00. 

DEADLINE for Classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
publication. In column 
Classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Roserfont Rd., 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mail to Classified Desk; or 
phone 486-3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis ; 
payment Is due upon 
receipt of statement, r- — 



I-SUNMINE ADS 



LOVES YA, MAMA BEAR. 
YOUR TOM 

JOE — Thanks for a won- 
derful evening, from the 
fuzzy-sleepy head. S. 

BILL — Thanks for ttie drink. 
I still need all the help I can 
get. S.L. 

IRENE — Hope your arm 
Isn't broken. (Yoo owe me 
one for a cliange). 



S^EEJ PAPA BEAR — 
You're^ my one and only. I 
love yOu. Yoor Diane. 

Tina and Vincie— I love yoo. 
Grandma No. 3. 



TERRY — Welcome back 
and get to work. The StaH 



64 BwiaeBB E^oipiieat 



ADDRESSOGRAPH 

MULTIGRAPH MACHINE 

MODEL NO. 1700-B 

EKCtllint condition. Ideal for Church, 
Cific, or small organizatfens with 
■ailinp net to excMd 500 plates. 
Above also includH filing cabinet and 
drawers tar mailing plates 

CONTACT Ml. BRMVH 

at m'U^,wmlUm I am te 5 pn 




mMm WantMi 



ALTERATIONS 8. 
SEWING, also Crocheted 
Bikinis. 486-0008. 

' AUTO JUNK 

Towed Away Free 
Call 8S-4372 



HAIRDRESSER 81 
VIVIAN WOODARD 
BEAUTY 
CONSULTANTS. 
Immediate openings, full 
»r part-time. Call Mrs 
Vesely, 3403230, 420 6808 



WE TOW 

JUNK CARS 

i23f1M 



BLOOD DONORS 
NEEDED 
Earn immediate cash. $40 'c 
MO a month. Blood plasma 
urgently needed. 

NORFOLK 
PLASAAACORP. . 

733GranbySt. 623-3173 



B&L 

TAX SERVICE 

YOUR Taxes done 
in "YOUR HOME!" 

Spaclallzing In all forms of 
Itemized Oaductloni 

Wa come to YOUR HOME- 
SAVING your tima and gasi 

LOWa8&12.50 

Itemized 
State ft Federal 

CALL 460-0776 
after 1 PM 



TELEPHONE 

SOLICITORS 

TOPPAY 

PLUS COMMISSION 

TUES. & THURS. 
FROM 

5:30 to 8:30 P.M. 

excellent 
Working Conditions 

EXPERIENCED ONLY 
NEED APPLY 

Call 486-3430 

Between 9-5 
Monday tliru Friday 



CANDY THE CLOWN - 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Openings. 587-3697. 

CHILDR'ENS ~ENTER^ 
lainment — Puppets 81 
Magic Anna Bell 428-1804 

CU STOM sewing" 
Wanted-Oresses, Pantsuits, 
etc. Stella Adams, Call 
Heffington, 427-1618. 

Foot AAassage by qualified 
Footreflexology-Therapist 
located at Va. Beach, for 
appointment 425-8163. 

KNAPPP SHOES 

One of the finest 

Work 81 Dress Shoes 

Made 

For service call 

Mr. Turner 420-4500 

INCOME TAX RETURNS 
Experienced Consultant 
will call at youi^ home. 499- 
3549, after 5 p.m. 

REDUCE SAFE 81 FAST 
with GoBese Tablets & E 
Vap "water pills", Barr's 
Drug. 

REDUCE Safe 8i Fast with 
GOBESE Tablets 8. E-Vap 
"water pills", MURDEN 
DRUGS. 



HELP! 

From the Citizens 

of 

Virginia Beach 

I need an opportunity to 
communicate with the 
Voters of our City and 
express my goals and 
qualifications to render 
FULL TIME service to 
YOUR CITY COUNCIL. 
(NO Strings Attached) 

EDLYNK 
481 -2523 

A Paid Political Adver- 
tisement,, by authority 
of the Treasurer of the 
Committee to Elect Ed 
Lynk. 



SB^tiLets 



CEMETERY LOT — 
Rosewood Memorial Park, 
1 lot, 4 graves; In the 
Garden of the Last Supper. 
426-7767. 



11 Automobiles for Sale 

FORD— 1972 LTD, 4 door 
hardtop, fully equipped. Call 
545-3480. 

IMPALA — 1965, excellent 
mechanical cond., new 
tires, starter 81 battery, etc. 
Needs paint. $450 or best 
offer. 340-0235. 

PONTIAC — 1967 Ventura, 
air conditioned, low 
mileage. l-owner. 
Excellent cond. $750. 340- 
2753. 

PINTO— 1973, Air cond., 
automatic, many extras, new 
tires. 853-1353. 



RENAULT 

Tha natiop^.iargMl selection of 
used BuWIli 'rom ttie natien's 
largest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices. AAoat 
are one owner cars witti our 
famous one yeer warranty. 

EASTERN Aim) , 

«3 E. LITTLE CREEK RD. SM 



VOLKSWAaEN-1970 Station 
Wagon. Excellent condition. 
FM 8 track Stereo. $1650. 340- 
2519, afternoons. 

19CMip,%oriiEqi#. 



FISHING 

ROD ft REEL 
REPAIR 
ft SERVICE 

486-l»6 



S 



21 



AUTHORIZED 

T-CRArriMMtJEA 

JACK TKK>IINTON 

MOaiLEHOM«» 



LADIES 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company will train 3 ladies 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 

$610 month to start 
Plus bonuses and benefits 

Call 499-2763 



33 Help Wanted Male 



ALARM INSTALLATION 
& SALES 

MEN 
NEEDED 
NOW 

$150 a week Salary 
Call iwr. Nelson ^t 857-5442 



34 Help Wanted M-F 

OPENINGS FOR 
3 PEOPLE 

Work pari or full time. Good 
Steady income in your area, 
no experience necessary. For 
appointment, call 623-4641. 

MANAGEMENT TRAIN-. 
EE Can earn ^ $200 
week salary while 
attending management 
training school if qualified. 
Will learn inventory 
Control, Accounts 
Receivable. Must learn how 
product is sold and how to 
teach others. Phone Mr. 
Bailey, 499 4606. 

$6.00 HOUR POSSIBLE 
PART-TIME. SHOW 
SAMPLE, TAKE ORDERS 
FOR ENGRAVED METAL 
SOCIAL SECURITY 
CARDS. SEND NAME, 
SOCIAL SECURITY 
NUMBER FOR FREE 
SAMPLE, DETAILS. 
LIFETIME PRODUCTS, 
BOX 10208, RICHMOND, 
VIRGINIA 23240. 

START VOUf» OWN 
CAREER 

in a fast growing business. 
Unlimited prestige in 
expanding market. Sales* 
experience or training 
helpful. For appt. call 497- 
2336. 

TRAINEE — An unusua: 
opportunity for an alert, 
responsible woman to. train 
as a LatMratory Technician 
with consulting and 
a-ialytical laboratory. No 
technical skill needed. 
Desire to learn a must. 
P/omlsing future for the 
right permanent resident. 
Call Jennings Laboratory 
for appoi ntmen t, 425-1498. 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY! 

6 men and women to start 
In good paying fob. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided. 

No experience necessary. 
We Will train you. 

Call 499-1763 



36l<^W«attd 



BABYSITTING— My home. 
Hilltop area. 428-5998. 

CHILD DAY CARE — for 
working mothers in my 
home. Lynnhaven area. 
Reasonable. 481-0410. 

LITTLE FRIEND to play 
with, my mommy will fake 
care of you while yours 
works. Windsor Woods, xa- 
6765. 

NEED CHALLENQE 

Creative young man, 
impatient with bureauracy, 
places restless finger in the 
wind, for opportunity to full 
utilize talents. Experience 
in professional and 
mtecutive capacities, able 
organizer, coordinator and 
troubleshooter, excellent 
writer, individualistic in 
style and Interest, yet can 
motivate others with 
diplomacy and right touch 
of humor. Will con^der 
travel or relocation, 
partnership or 
employment, any form of 
challenge! Write Box C2M, 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. 
Rosemont Rd., Virginia 
Beach, va. 23452. 

PAINTER— Feminine tOMCh. 
Commercial «id r^Mmn^w. 
Call 4314393. 



TYPING — in my h(Mne, 
experienced secretary; 
reasonable. 420-9584. 



38 Bminew Opportunittes 

A CHANCE TO 

SUCCEED— develop your 
own business. Call 3401317 
after 5 PM. 



43A Oeneral Instructions 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
Morrisson, 438-0587. 

PIANO TEACHER - 
Beginners through ad- 
vanced. Lessons in your 
home. 428 4670. 



GRIMES 

MUSIC SCHOOL 

FMvate Music Lessons in 

Pembroke Area 

5 String Banjo-Tenor Banjo- 
Guitar-Electrlc Bass-Hawa- 
iian Guitar-Mandolin, 

Call Aftei 4 P.M. 4991428 



45 Piivate Initroctions 



International Dance Studio' 

Pembroke Mall 



497-2731 or 499-9045 
Did you know that touch 
dancing is back? Tiy oui 
inttoductory offer with 
hosts Jim and Judy 
Hudgins. We ate located 
between Sean and Lerneis 
at PEMBROKE MALL 



S] HOMehoW Oooiis 

FURNITURE from Model 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room, $99.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recliner, 
Bunk Beds, $68 each; Maple 
Boston Rocker, $45. Easy 
terms. Call Mr. Kay at 622- 
5140, dealer. 

i^^rte^^u^^^^^ 

ELECTRIC TRAINS — 
Lionel, American Flyer, 
Ives, others. Cash. 497-4213. 

WE NEED BADLY 
I Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band Instruments, 
Typewriters, guns. 

LITTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 632-6969 

Everything you could want in 
component Stereo, will sell 
for $650, worth far more, call 
428-1125 for complete layout 

58 Good Thiny Too Eat 

WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
the dozen or by the bushel. 
Earl Smith Oyster Co., 947 
Nurds rd., 340-5171. 

59 Firewood 

HARDWOOD — or soft. 
Delivered $60 full cord; $35 
.. half cord. 428-4355, 

60 Lawn and Garden 

GARDEN PLOTS 
Now renting, 2004 Rokeby 
av.. So. Military hwy. near 
Greenbriar Farms. 420- 
3981. 

6M S8e<b-Pl8iit»Flow»fi 

GROW YOUR OWN fruit! 
Free copy 48 pg. Planting 
Guide Catalog in color, of- 
fered by Virginia's largest 
growers of fruit trees, nut 
trees, berry plants, grape 
vines, landscaping plant 
material. Waynesboro 
Nurseries- Waynesboro, 
Virginia 22980. 




47 Dogs, Cats, Other Pets 

BASSET HOUNDS — Male, 
Female, 3 years old. 
Registered. 486-3058. 

BEAGLES — 1 male 8 weeks, 
$25; Ml mo'.. old, $35. 583 
3176. 

HAMSTERS 

With cages 

$5eacti 486-3699 



PEKEAPOO Pups. Wor 
meri. 1 temporary shot. 
Males. 420 6288. 

RABBITS — Babies, white 
8c colored. California 8r New 
Zealand mixed. 497-8790. 

RABBITS — Adult and 
Babies, Checkers 8< Dutch. 
486-6324. 

SAMOYED - male. 
Excellent with children. 
Amateur prize winner. 497- 
9177. 



SCOTTISH TERRIER 
PUPPIES — From 
famyscott Champions. 
Sybbald. 428-9340. 

ST. BERNARDS— -10 weeks 
old, shots. Also 1 male Toy 
Poodle puppy. Ail AKC. 340- 
0140. 

51 Articles For Sale 

AIR CONDITIONERS, 6,000 
BTU, $100, 8,000 (Casement) 
$100 , 18,500 , $125, excellent 
condition. 486-1691. 

Bicycles - Mens 8i Womens 3 
Speed, Both Excellent 
Condition, Mans has 
speedometer, both BMA 
Certified, $120 or $60 
separate Call 428-1135 

CERAMIC GLAZES — Vj 
Price for lot purchase. Must 
sell. 340-3485. 

CROCHETED AFGHANS— 
Many sizes and colors. $25.- 
$40. 486-6637. 



63 Building Materials 

HOME Builders i. Con- 
tractors - Let us help you 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM Si EATON 427-3200. 



64 Bi'itiness Equipment 



RENT OR BUY — new 8. 
used office furniture. Ex- 
rentai desks $49 8< up. New 
damaged files $39 81 up. Free 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397-7883 



W MOBILE ^ 
1 HOMES ^ " 

65 Mobile Homes Fof Sale 



HOMETTE— 1964, 10x50', 2 
bedrooms, front kitchen, 
mostly furnished. Must be 
moved. Reasonable. 497-6376. 



MEDALLION— 1971, 13'x54', 
semi-furnished 2 bedrooms, 
washer, dryer. Small equity, 
assume payments 31 months. 
497-2141. 

1968 ALLEGHENY Delux 2 
bedroom IV3 bath with 
extras; double bed; maple 
dresser w-mirror, zenith 
stereo console; 2 air 
conditioners; new hot water 
heater. Full price $4,500. 
May stay on lot or be 
moved. Call after 5, 497- 
4594. 

OLYMPIC — 1973, 3 
bedrooms furnished. Owner 
being transferred. Just take 
over payments. 425-1991. 



73 Apartments-Furwishetl 



GRANDFATHER CLOCK 
Large 



Mahogany 
West m in 



walnyl; 
chimes?'588-3126. 



ister 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

VMnle, rates; 2 room efftciencv. 
wttkly tnu monthly r»tM, color TV 
bnic aating and cooking utenslli, dl 
Dtllitlts. 

VIRGINIAN 

MOTOR APIS. 

310 24th ft. 



INSULATION — 3'/j" full 
thick. 4.39 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1379. 



GUN SHOW 

Guns, Coins, 

Knives, Mliitaria 

BUY OR SELL 

TRADEOR LOOK 

April 6 8. 7 at 

Scope Exhibition Hall 

488-1238or 497-4570 



SIA Antiques 



FURNITURE REFIN- 
ISHED and Re- 

paired. Chairs caned. 
Free pickup 8> delivery. 
424 2941. 



76AMow>Sto««r 

FURNltURE MOVING — 
Washers, dryers, 
refrigerators, Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a week and 
holidays no extra charge. 
8539308. 

77 Houses for Rent 

LAKE EDWARD WEST— 
Townhouse, 3 bedrms, IVj 
baths, washer, dryer, 
refrig., range, dishwasher. 
Vacant Apr. 4. 497 2106, 423- 
5370. 



78 Resort prepertY-Kwt 



HOUSES 8. 
APARTMENTS 
Available on a yearly or^ 
short term basis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

333 Laskin rd. 

^^^^4^^8^^^^^ 

79 Wanted To Rent 

SUIVIMER RENTAL 
WANTED 

for family of 5. July and or 
August. Walking distance of 
beach. Cape Henry- 
Lynnhaven area. Reply, C. 
Ives, Box 105, Burke, r^a. 
22015. 




83 Fanm-Uii^ThafcttFor S8l« 

SALEM RD.— Nice 3 bedrm. 
house on large lot, plus ad- 
joining 7V2 acres of open 
land, fine for horses. 



PILOT REALTY 
427-6000 



86 Pot Sale Viiginia Beach 



BROOKWOOD — LARGE 
■"FAMILY ? 4Vj bedrooms, 
2V; baths, with large fenced 
rear yard. Call Ronnie 
Fowler, 486-4041, 486-1369. 
We trade. Higgins Realty, 
Inc. 

I BROOKWOOD — Ranch 
style, 3 large bedrooms plus 
4th room for bedroom, 
study or hobby; 2 baths, 
family rm., built-in kitchen, 
dining rm., garage. By 
owner. No agents. 340-9180 

COUNTRY HOME — 1 
acre; 5 minutes to Oceana, 
Dam Neck Bases. 3 
bedrooms, 1 bath, double 
garage, workshop, fenced. 
$27,500. No agents. Owner, 
340-9180. 

GREENRUN 

WHYRENT? 
Pay equity and assume this 
3 bedroom townhouse. Call 
Roy Wilkes, 486-4041, or 486- 
1796. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc. 

KING'S GRANT — VA 
BUYERS! 3 bedroom brick 
Ranch with extras. Double 
garage. Robert Fowler, 486- 
4041, 486-1369. We trade. 
Higgins Realty Inc. 

NORTH LANDING FARMS 

— Plenty of garden space 
on beautiful Vi acre lot. 3 
bedroom 2 bath brick 
ranch, priced right! Call 
Robert or Ronnie Fowler, 
486-4041 or 486-1369. W# 
trade. Higgins Realty, Inc. 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 

— 4 bedroom 2Vi bath Split 
level. 2 car garage, 
carpeting, Redwood fenced 
yard. 486-5913. 

WINDSOR OAKS WEST — 

BEAT INFLATION 
Assume 7 percent VA loan 
and pay equity to get 8 
rooms of Colonial comfort 
with fireplace. Call Andy 
Wood, 486-4041, or 340-6861. 
We trade. Higgins Realty, 
inc. 

WINDSOR OAKS WEST 
$33,000 
Stay cool in summer and 
cozy in winter with central 
air conditioning and 
lireplace. IdeaJ for the young 
or an elderly couple. Call me 
for information on financing. 
Eliie Taianian, 486-4041 or 
340 1690. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc. 



91 Resort Property For Sale 

CAROVA BEACH — 140' 
waterfront canal to bay lot. 
Section 6 on Dolphin Lane. 
Lot 70. $6,500. Terms 
available. 4355757, 435-0308. 

96 WMiled Real Estate 

CASH TALKS 
WebuySisell. Need Homes. 
Call 464-6205. Crowgey 
Realty. 



NEED HELP! 




B% house pqrments about to 
JatanvM und« % tteSid 
m^Ut US liH ftat too- big 
house for you ^L 

Call 



acfeaon 




REALTY. INC 



48(M)556 



ANTIQUES 

WE BUY 
ANYTHING OLD 
Furniture, Qlatiware. 

On* Place or 
Entire Eitat*. 

622-4182 



52 Houa^oM Goods 

$3M.00 delivers 3 room 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. 1st 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. •Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd.. near 
OM-ner of Tidewater (b*.. bi 
Norfolk. Phone 633-4165. 



SEmNG..RENTING..BllYING..1RilDING 

BISSEH REALTY, INC. 

"A Reqiected Name In Real Eitate" 

Thalia Shopping Center 
4316 Viisinia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 
SALES 

Mike Vance, QRI 340-7000 LovdlPowen, 420-3802 
Row BiMtt,GRI 840-9898 Lee O-Brien 340-4084 

RENTALS 

itA BiMtt, GRI 340-$6M 

OFFICE 340-9721 




IE state 



Tin Sun-HlMimdaY, April 3. W74-I>i9l B-7 



ONSUME 



I 



Shop around 
for bargains 
in insurance 

By Peter Weaver 



Q. What's the cheapest life insurance? — L.K., 
Phoenix, Ariz, 

f A. Term insurance is the least costly, especially if 
you can get it through a club, employer, association, 
union or other group rate. If you're buyii^an 
individual policy (not group rate), you can get a 
significant price reducti(Ni per $l,O0O-w(x-th of 
insurance when you buy a policy with a face value of 
$25,000 (H* more. Term insurance rates (or policies with 
face values of $25,000 and up are quite competitive 
now. Shop around. One company recently lowered its 
rate for a $25,000, five-year, renewable term policy (for 
a 35-year-old male) from $150 to$118 a year. Make sure 
your policy is guaranteed renewable. 



Mind ^fir Money 



Q. When is the best season to have gutters replaced? 
What type of gutter gives the least problems? — Mrs. 
J.M., Buffalo, N.Y. 

A. When gutters are broken or leaky, the first bre«* 
in the weather is the best season. Most good gutters are 
made of aluminum. They can be purchased in pre-cut 
lengths for do-it-yourselfers. But, before you try 
iretalling your own gutters, consider how high you'll be 
working off tt»e ground. It can be a risky business. 

Contractors (found under "roofer" or "sheet metal" 
in phone book yellow pages) can put in seamless 
gutters that are cut to order right on the job. These 
tend to last longer and are less lUcely to leak. 
Protective strainers to keep leaves out are a help. Most 
gutters and (townspouts should be checked and cleaned 
once a year. 

TAKE NOTE: You can get an illusbtited calendar- 
manual on how to protect your trees, flowers and 
vegetables from insects and plant disease, by sending 
$2 to: Concern, Inc., 2233 Wiscorsin Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20007. It's called "The Living 
Garden" and emjrfiasis is on natural controls, not 
pesticides. 

YOUR ENERGY MONEY: Having a garage modify 
or disconnect your car's emission control equipment in 
an attempt to get better gas mileage might give you 
even worse gas mileage. The Environmental 
ProtecticHi Agency tested 13 ordinary service garages 
and found that the average car lost 3.5 per cent gas 
mileage after the emmission control tampering. In only 
one car was Ae mileage significantly improved. 

Q King Features Syndicate, Inc., 1974. 

Peter Weaver welcomes questions from readers 
tor possible use in his column. Please send letters 
to him in care of Virginia Beach Sun, 138 Rose- 
mont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 2S452. 

Sawyer attends workshop 



Higher rents predicted 
9S apartments increase 



Fewer single family hirnies and more 
apartmaits— that's generally the prediction of 
most housing experts looking through their 
crystal ball at new housing production in 1974. 
But lock out for those uicreasing rents. 

Overall, new housing is expected to cut down to 
about 1.3 million units in 1974. according to 
George C. MaVtin. immediate past president of 
the National Association of Home Builders. 
That's quite a drop from the two million units 
produced last year, or the 2.4 million units in- 
1972. 

IN SHARP contrast, there are expected to be 
about 900,000 new units in multifamily structures 
completed this year— up from 700,000 units last 
year. This includes apartment rental and 
condominium units. 

The lessening number of new single family 
homes is primarily due to the energy crisis, "no 
growth" pressures in many communities and 
record high prices. As vahies continue to rise, 
increasing numbers of families will be unable 
to afford their own home. One housing expert 
predicts home prices will rise so sharply during 
the next two years that families with $12,000 or 
less anraial income will be pushed out of the 
market. 

These families will be subsequently pushed 



into a rental unit But what does the crystal ball 
say about rents. Economist Eliot Janeway sees 
"a Imathtak^ increase in rents, up to 200 or 300 
per cent, be^nnii^ 1974. 

"We are hMking at a dosing of the rent gap 
such as has already occured in many other 
nations," he said in a recent talk. "Buikling 
stoppages caused tq/ the cost of money and the 
energy crisis will cause this old-fashioned 
correction in the level of rents." 

IF THE expected increased number of new 
apartment units are produced Oiis year, it will 
help to hold the rising rents down to a liveable 
level. Also, new construction materials and 
technology are beiig develq)ed that could spur 
the vohime (tf new units, thus holding the line on 
rents in a c<Hnpetitive climate. 

An optimistic note on housing was sounded by 
Dr. Bernard J. Frieden, directiM- of the Jtdnt 
Center for Urban Studies (funded parUaliy by 
HUD). He projected that 23 million new housing 
units are "likely to be built" in the U.S. before 
1980. 

"These units will provide livii% space for those 
who can pay their own way in the housing 
market," ne said. "This volume of production is 
within the capacity of our nation's housing 
industry, if it receives the indirect mortage aids 
and tax treatment the federal government now 
provides." 



Financ^Business/Economy 

Aim spring cleaning 
at energy conservation 




Emmett "Buz" Sawyer 
of Virginia Beach recently 
completed a home 
electronics and major 
appliance workshq) at the 
J.C. Penny Regional 
Training Center in Atlanta. 

The workshop covered a 
wide range d subjects, 



including personal 
motivation, advanced sales 
techniques and customer 
relations. 

Mr. Sawyer is a sales 
associate at the Military 
Circle J.C. Penney store. 
He has been with the 
company since 1970. 



MJP. AND WILLIAM KENNEDY 

Communication 
agency opens 

Pembrolce office 



Mofcone compMas oowse 



Roger J. Moscoi^ has 
successfully competed 
Course A of the 1973 Winter 
Realtor's Institute of the 
Virginia Association of 
Realtors at the University 



of Virginia. 

Mr. Moscone is 
associated with the 
Virginia Beach firm of 
Stohl Realty Corp. 



William S. Kennedy and 
Ms. M.F.P. Kennedy have 
announced the opening of 
the communications 
agency, Kennedy and 
Kennedy, Inc., in the 
Pembroke One Office 
Building on Independence 
Boulevard. 

According to Mr. 
Kennedy, "the firm's 
service includes 
advertising, promotion, 
merchandising, collateral 



materials, sales aids, 
public relations and 
research. 

Mr. Kennedy and Ms. 
Kennedy have comluned 
experience of 25 years with 
some of the nation's lai^est 
food corpwations. He was 
formerly senior vice- 
president of Buchen 
Advertising in New York. 
She was formerly editwial 
director of Food 
Management ma^zine. 



I # 



* 
t 
I 
I 






GOT ITCHY FEET? 

naaafaif to mar*, hut yoB Mcd M; mUiv you 
hMM? WeVa nU Mt on taraatMy ofkonn and 
need yon IWiifi. 

Yon att qakk NMlii wiM yoa liit wMh-M Cd 
■ow... 340«3^1,BWiti4«I-S357 

Fred Solea, Manager 



Qemnl RmI Umt 
1 16 Uendofi Brid(« Shoppinf Cmttr 



^ 



>:^ 



NEED 
A 

HAND? 

We can help you with all your 
\reml estate andinswance needs, 



CALL NOWl 

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METROLEASE 



4999 



St..VI(^irfiBtKh,Va. 



Bmhm honored 
for postal servicei> 



Clarine Nixon Brehm was recently presented 
the United States Postal Service Special Award 
when she retired from the postal service after 30 
years with Virginia Beach post offices. 

Ms. Brehm began her career with the postal 
service in 1944 as a clerk at the Oceana Post 
(Xfice. then a small third-class (rffice in a 
grocery store. 

She continued her career as a postal clerk 
when the Oceana office was converted to a 
classified station in the Vir^nia Beach postal 
system. 

Postmaster J.T. Crosswhite Jr. presented the 
special service award to Ms. Brehm. 



This is a good time to 
|dan an expanded pr(«ram 
of spring house ciraning for 
your home. The 
"expanded" bit should 
inchade special measures 
to conserve energy and 
prevent needless 
depreciation. 

Energy-conserving steps 
could inoiude weather- 
strippng door frames and 
windows and adding 
needed insulation in inner 
walls and ceilings. When 
warmer days arrive, close 
the fireidace damper when 
your fireplace is not in use 
and install awnings or 
other sun-protectora to cut 
down air conditioning 
needs. 

Also, as days and nights 
warm up, be sure to lower 
your thermostat setting. 
For every degreed F ) lower 
your setting, you'll save 2 
to 3 per cent on fuel. Such 
steps not only conserve 
energy but save money and 
reduce depreciation on 
furnaces and air 
conditioning units. ; 

OTHER steps taken now 
to prevent future 
depreciation could save 
major repair costs and 
inconveniences. One 
housing expert who has 
recently conducted a study 
of effective depreciation- 



prevention measures s> 
suggests homeowners start 
by getting better 
acquainted with their 
property. Know where 
switches, drains, circuits 
and pipes are located. 

The authority, Jackson 
W. Goss, pr^ident and 
chid executive officer of 
Investors Mortgage 
Insurance Company of 
Boston, stresses the need to 
keep commonly used repair 
materials on hand at all 
times. Regular 
inspections of roof, 
windows, outside walls, 
drains, driwnspouts, 
driveways, walka and 



patios are particularly 
Important. "Don't let 
hairline cracks become 
gaping holes," he said. 

Painting the house every 
two tc four years i» a'good 
plan. Some ade^ "do-it- 
yourselfers" alternate 
painting different portions 
of the house each year to 
preclude major all-at-once 
projects. 

KKRP A sharp lockout 
for faulty wiring, This, In 
most cases, calls for the 
services of an electrical 
contractor. As for those 
sinks and faucets, be sure 
to check and repair them — 
also drain and Install 
wnhera when needed. 



Pembroki courts ipailiiimts 

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Patf 6-8— The Sun— Wednesday, April 3, 1974 



Is the 




toward another big freeze? 



By ANN WINN 
HppcialloTheSun 

Tired <rf hi^ prices for food 
and fuel? Then watch the 
weather reports— not just to see 
if a cold snap will damage the 
wgetaUe garden or prolong the 
Keating season, but to ponder a 
long-range global cooling trend 
which some scientists believe 
"carries the potential for 
human disasters jof 
unprecedented magnitude." 

What's happening? In a 
recent article in ^ Fortune 
magazine, Tom Alexander 
pointe out ttiat in the last decade 
a number of scientists from 
several disciplines have 
conchided that "for nearly half 
of the current century, mankind 
was apparently blessed with the 
most benign climate of any 
period in at least a thousand 
years. But now there's good 
reason to believe that the 
world's climate is reverting 
rapidly to its less beneficient 
norm." 

While the total drop in 
(empe-ature since the high 
point in 1945 is only about 2.7 
degrees, the effects have been 
dramatic. Icelandic fishing 
fleets that used to range 
northward during the warm 
period have now had to return to 
traditional waters to the south. 
Mr. Alexander points out For 
the first time in this century, 
ships heading for Iceland's 
ports have been troubled by 
dHf ting ice. And in England, the 
average growing season is two 
weeks shorter than it was 
before 19S0. 

"THE MOSTTFXLfNG effect 
of the falling temperatures is to 
alter the vast, integrated 
system of winds that sweep 
about the planet And the most 
grievous result of the new wind 



pattern has been the blocking of 
vital monsoon rains upon which 
large sections oi Africa, Asia, 
and Central Am«-ica dqiend." 
according to Mr. Alexander. 

"The droughts south of tlw 
Sahara— where unknown 
thousands of persons have died 
of famine and its associated 
diseases and millions more 
have been kept alive only by 
emergency food shipments- 
have been well publicized. It is 
not so well known that the 
African drought belt is part of a 
much larger dry-weather 
pattern extending all the way 
through the Middle East to 
India, South Asia and North 
China. While these regions-were 




GIBSON 

Sun sales 
manager 
Gibson dies 

Matthew D. Gibson, relail 
sales manager for The Sun died 
Thursday in a local hospital. He 
was 48. 

Mr. Gibson, of 237 Bay Colony 
Drive, was the husband of Mr. 

Elizabeth Bowden Gibsoa He 
was a native cf Canada and 
lived in Virginia Beach for two 
years. He was a member of 
Eastern Shinre Chapel. 

Funeral services were 
Sunday at Eastern Shore 
Episcopal Chapel, with the Rev. 
Charles Riddle III and the Rev. 
Howard Hanchey officiating. 

Burial was Sunday at Eastern 
Shore Chapel Cemetery. 

His family has requested that 
donations in Mr. Gibson's 
memory be made to Eastern 
Shm-e Chapel for FISH. 

RECEIVES DEGREE 

Th(mias Dickson Pretlow of 
Virginia Beach recently 
graduated from Ohio State 
Uraversity, at Columbud, Ohio. 

Mr. Pretlow received a 
master of science degree. 




4^-8500 



Mf ScninCe. 



drying up, (daces as widely 
scattered as the midwestern 
U.S., the Philiiplnes and Italy 
were submerged in some of Jhe 
severest ftoods in centuries. 
And while low-temperature 
records were being broken in 
some northern regions, Siberia 
for example, others such as 
European Russia and the 
northeastern U.S. were 
enjoying unprecedentedly 
warm winters." 

Reid Bryson, a leading 
climatdogist who directs the 
Institute for Environmental 
Studies at the University of 
Wisconsin, says that if this 
climate chaise continues "it 
will affect the whole human 



occupation (d the eartb—like a 
iHllion people starving." 

WHAT'S HAPPENING is that 
because of the worldwide 
cooling-off the lower edge of the 
great cap of high-altitude winds 
revolvii^ about the poles from 
west to east has recently stayed 
farther south during the 
summer. Fortune's charts show 
how this "circumpdar vortex" 
has kept the high-pressure 
zones farther south, too, 
Uodcing the monsoons out of 
regions where they are vital to 
the survival of hundrecte of 
millions of people. The vertex's 
semi-stationary wave patterns 
have changed, making the 
climate more variable. The 



^^eeper wave over the U.S. is 
nB^lieved responsible for recent 
cdd winters in the west and 
. mild ones in the east 

Mr. Bryson brieves tl»t the 
period from about 1890 to 1945 
amounted merely to a brief 
respite from the "little ice age" 
that has held the world in lU 
grip ever since the I60i century. 
Many researchers agree that 
the earth is now heading very 
slowly into another major iet 
age such as the one that brought 
the glaciers deep into North 
America befcre it retreated- 
s(»ne 10,000 years ago. 

The new weather patterns 
probably will do more lunn 
than good, even in North 



Amerioi, i|ec<irdlRg toFmtuae. 
While tiie niccrasful harvests of 
the last 15 years or so are 
usually attributed to imiNtyved 
teclmdogy and crc^ strains, 
James McQuiffi, climattrit^t 
at the Univernty of Minouri, 
says that at least as much credit 
should be given to extremdy 
favorable temperatures' and 
rainfall. 

ELSEWHERE IN THE 

work!, the effects of these 
weather changes could be 
"massively tragic," says 
Fortune. A British scientist 
concluded that if- these weather 
patterns contiraie, they will 
shift entire (Mserts such as the 



Sahara southward, and "all 
numkind's efforts to halt such 
climatoh^al encnnchment 
by, for example, planting 
windbreaks, or irrigation, will 
be futile." 

hfr. Bryson believes that 
monso(Mis will probably t«A 
return regularly to ref^ons such 
as northern India during the 
remainder cf this century. If he 
is cmrect says Fortune, there 
would seem to be scant prospect 
Uiat even the present 
populations ol the monsoon 
belts can be maintained, even if 
aU the arable land in the rest of 
the world were idaced in full 
production for this purpose. 

Sane climatologists are 



unconvinced by Mr. Brys<wi's 
theories, believing that climate 
changes are a random matter 
(H* are caused by sunspot cycles 
or otlur factors. But at l^st one 
recent convert, Kenneth Hare, 
former inesident (A the Re^al 
Meteorological Society Jn 
Britain, Is CMicerned enmigh to 
try to persuade governments to 
establish food banks to meet the 
climate-caused emergencies 
that may come. 

Fortune's cautious conclusion 
is that climate appears to be 
wildly fluctuating variable and 
that "in writing the equations 
for mankind's survival, we'd 
bet^r allow plenty of margin 

for BITOT. " 




GORE'S 



m Division ofi (^^ 
• avmng pnooucrg comp/tivr 



Evans Deluxe 
One Coat Exterior 
Latex House Paint 



SPRING 
PAINT SALE 




Regularly 8.99! 



gallon 

Formulated in 14 handsome colors plus White to give your home the durable 
Latex protection it requires to resist today's destructive elements - Evans 
finest quality house paint sucessfully combats the harmful effects of pollution, 
alkali, moisture and fading, plus it contains the unique chemical Barium Meta- 
borate to fight mildew. Hurry in now for Spring fix-up savings on your choice 
of 14 handsome colors plus Evans bright White - including Evans creamy new 
Williamsburg Whitel Mild pleasant odor plus fast and easy soap and water brush 
or roller clean-up after painting. You and your home deserve the "8 year paint" 
. . . Evans . . . from Moore's! 

iViiidew-Resistant, White Only 
Alkyd House Paint . .Reg. 9.99 8.49 





Save ^2.00 Per Panel On 
Evans Camelot Birch Paneling 



Regulariy 11.591 




each 



(Yas save $2.00 on each %"x4'x8' Camelot panel. Prefiniihed on 
Birdt hardwood veneer plywood paneling. The beautiful d^xth 
and luster of real Birch venews is apparent at a ^ance. If s em- 
bossed distressing adds a chwming character to any wall. Save at 
Moores tomojTOwl 



EVANS 
7.991 



Your Choice - Antique Or Natural Birch 
Both A Full %'* Thick . . . 



Enjoy the room-lightening pastel woodgrains of 
Sun Gold, Tree Green or White Agate. Evans Fox- 
fire series of pref inished, decorative printed ply- 
wood paneling has built-in surface protection to 
guard against moisture, mars & scratches. 4'x8'- 
x5'32". 



Elegantly suitable for the most special room in your 
horhe. The depth and luster of these genuine hardwood 
Birch veneers is apparent at a glancel Prefinished on Birch 
veneer Yt" plywood paneling, it's luxury st a sensible price. 
Your choice of Antique or Natural finish. 4'x 8'x V4" 



6 



95 



each 




Single Bowl 
Laundry Tray 



Reg. 
18.85! 



15s» 



Constructed of stain-resistartt lus- 
trous fibenilaH — «von't <^ip or 
craze urtder normal usage. Includes 
riuminum stand with adjustable 
leven for simplifiad installation. 
(Lets fittings.) 



Seal Out Moisture • 
Fibered Roof Coating 

SGalion 095 

Can O each 

Adheres to any surface— metal 
or composition roofing, flash- 
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foundations, etc Prolongs roof 
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5 Lite - Real Wood 
Wagon V^^ieel Fixture 



Reg. 
51.36! 



43¥ 



Polished wood wagon wheel 
chandelier recalls ttie nostal- 
gia of the OMe W«st with m- 
tique copper shades & trim, 
* frosted glass chimneys. 
Great in family roomsl 



Work Bendi Legs & 
Tool Organizer . . . 



Reg. 
15.99! 



MHl! aad< 



Solid ttMl frwning wMt tool orgwi- 
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(rfywood or particr. bowd to eofl- 
rtruct bench In tiM length ^ou nmm 



Self Storing Aluminum 
Storm Windows . . . 



Reg. 
14.491 



HI HI each 




Pine Cabinet Doors - 
Ideai For Buiiding Aii 
Kinds Q.f Cabinetry 



Regularly 3.90! 



SALE 

B 

10"x24' 



^1! 
10 



Cut your furniture building costs down to the minimum whje 
you create outstanding cabinetry with handsome pine cabinet 
doors with stationary louvers. Doweled & giued construction 
- no staples! Presanded, preassembled, ready to paint, stain or 
antique as you choose. Available in 10", 12" and 15" widths, 
and heights of 20", 24", 29", 33" & 36". Not all sizes at all 
stores. Hardware extra. 




Ready To Finish 
Exterior Wood Biinds 
Saie Priced At Only 



SALE 



Regulariy 8.421 



5 



95 

12"x39" 



12" X 4r' . . . Reg :io.io 7»» 

Frame the windows of your home - |3^int\up it's architectural! 
beauty with stationary louver pine shut^rs)from ^oore's. Pre-' 
sanded blinds are ready to paint or stain tb give yobf home's 
appearance more importance. Choose from several/i^opular 
stock sizes. Hardware extra. "'^^ 



Use Your Banic Cliarge Card. 
YMir Satisfaction 
GuarMtteed in* ^^i 

Money Refunded, r^ 




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CORE'S 



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Your choica of stock sizts to 101 

Unittd IndiM (htight timas width). 
Tripto track indu^ 2 if am panels, 
1 scracn for all saason um. Extrudtd| 
aluminum with wool pile Insulation. 



Supermarket of Lumber 



Building IMaterials 



^ai*. 



CHESAPEAKE.3224 Atlantic Ave. 

Piione 543-3561 

OPM MONDAY fc FRIDAY 7:30 AM to 8 PM 
TiiM., Wad, Thur*. 7:30 AM to 5:30 PM-SAT. to 4 PM 



& 



ViRGINiA BEACH .Va. Beach Blvd. 

(.1 AMe W^M of Fi'kiceu Anne Mnrai 

Piione 340-6772 

OPOI DAMLY 7:30 AM-8 PM, SAT. 7:30 AM-A PM 



Mmt I iiii rr* — ""— ' 



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m^^mi 



3% 



WMr« the 

iun ClassiflecN 
For PiiwD to Nenn 8w 
«^ CALL 486-3483. 
48M4S4. 



49th Year No. 15 



Circulation 20,750 




f 



SERIALS SECtlW 
f A STATE LI»A«t 



""mi 





Wadnesday, April 10, 1974 



City of Virginia Bwch. Vffc-f ^'^Ef.OBKcorp. ^ 



15 Cants 




irs JUST ANOTHER day In one of 
Virijinia Beach's run-down apartment units 
whorp broken windows, poor plumbing and 
nnnr insulation goes unrepaired by area 



landlords. But. it's a landlord's market, 
;ind tenants must simply live with the 
situation. (Son photo by Rod Mann) 



FUNDS FAU SHOUT 



Dim future seen 




By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

The Virginia Beach Public Health inspector 
arrived at the small wooden house on Holland 
Road. Behind the condemned sign on the door 
huddled Marjorie Cooic and her five children. 

Ms. Cook (not her real name) had found shelter 
for herself and her children in the old condemned 
house when they had no where else to go. The in- 
spector was there to try to get the Codes out of the 
boose, which had been placarded by the Health 
Department several months ago. 

As he entered the home to convince the woman 
they needed to find other more habitable living 
conditions, he pulled back the curtain that 
separated the kitchen from the living area. In the 
middle of the kitchen floor sat six large rats. 

IT'S NOT LIKE the Virginia Beach any tourist 
will ever see. And, it's not like any Virginia Beach 
shown in the city's annual report. It's the living 
situations with which those persons who cannot 
afford most Beach housing must contend. 

The future for demolishing the Beach's sub- 
standard housing seems dim as does the future for 
construction of more low-moderate income housing 
in the city. 

If the city contirwes on its present path of virtual 
non'^nforcement of the minimum housing code, Uie 
substandard housing situation is likely to get worse 
instead of better, accenting to the City Health 
Department. Residents in housing 15 years or older, 
like those persons in the Aragona area, are already 
reporting problems with the aging structures. Some 
persons now working with families living in tte 
city's poOT housing question why the city's 
minimum housing c(^e is ncH^used to prevent more 
substandard housing from dev^^pi|^ as well as to 
clean up Uie existing hmjsing blight. 

Lack oi manpower in the Public Health Depart- 
ment, which is suppcsed to enforce the code, is one 
aiBwer. The city has never been adequately staffed 
to deal witti the hmising situation and enforcement 
of the code. 

City Manager Roger Scott, in his 1974-75 bixlget 
pn^osal, suggests the code enforcen»ntbei>laced 
completely under the city administratiw) in the 
Community Services Department, rather than 
remaining uncter the joint city-state operation in Uie 
Hraltti Department. The city manager has 
budgrted fundte only for a fwnr pers(m^ staff of in- 
spectors, which is ttje number now employed in the 
minimum housing division of the Health Depart- 
ment. 

PAHT OF THE problem is there are many 
perams in the city who simply cannot affcntl to 
repair the home they own. Sojme are <m welfare, 
social security or disability payments awl othere 
hold (tom^tic Jc^ and are not h^^ salaried. In 
those csmes, even a strwig housing code wwild 
|rot»bly be no help unl^s the resi<tents could get 
mwietary aid to rehabilitate their hon». Wh«« the 
heme is so pow it ^Muld be condemned, marq? 
times ttie owners r^use to move becanw th«e to BO 
whveetoe for thwi to live. The Health Departmwit 
sayttl^caniMA^aUy f<Mt:ea man wt (tf a house 

Ik omM. 

"There is quite a bit (rf sutstandbrd bous^ 
owned by the pwsons living In tlw home," says 
Rhys Kear of the aty Planning Department. The 
peq>te have llwd thwe all Uwir Uws, a«J they 



'A (substandard) house 

is not a homOHHMiJiHHHi 

-'Seri es 

nis is the final article of a Oiree-partieriet in which Sun 
Staff Writer Linda Miller examines ttm problem of substandard 
housing in Virginia Beach. 



don't want to move out of their home, especially 
into rental housing, no matter how substandard thie 
concUtions may be." 'tMr. Kear suggests the city 
might consider giving some sort of tax relief to 
builders to encourage the building of more low- 
mocterate income homes.) 

The run-down rental houses and apartments 
which landlords should repair, however, are a 
differajt story. In many cases, the tenants have 
begged for installation of a bathroom, repair of 
walls or better insulation, but it is a landlord's 
market in the Beach. If the tenant doesn't like the 
living conditions, doesn't |»y his rent in protest or 
calls the Health Department— the landlord will tell 
him to find someplace else to live. 



ABSENTEE LANDLORDS are a big (M-oblem. 
Though the Health Department has no figures on 
the number of landlords who live outside the city, 
research into the city tax records will show that 
some of the worst houses in the Beach— those off of 
Indian River Road, in Seatack and in the Beach 
BorcN^h— are owned in many cases by persons whd 
live outside the city. Owners often are residents of 
neighboring cities, but some live in others stat^. 
The landlords are not available either to ansv^er 
tenant com{rfaints or for Health Department 
scrutiny. 

Some landlords, howev^, are Beach resiitoits. 
Police Lt. Henry Capps, whose name remains on 
the tax re«rds as co-owner <rf some apartment 
units on Caress Avenue, says he "gettii^ out of the 
housing busft»ess# Mr. Capps says he is ttttning over 
his share in the apartments to his partner. Mr. 
Capps and City Councilman Murray Malbon have 
owned other substandard hmising, twt according to 
the Health Department have been cooperative in 
helpii^ relocate the persons in the Iwmes and 
seeing that the structures were eiU»r demolished 
or repaired. '^ '^* 

But, as far as the enforcement of the housing wde 
in most rental housing ca^s, it simply isn't always 
doi^. Some persois see it as a political question. 



■is 



"Y<MJ'VE GOT a cwncilmanic election coming 
up," said Pfenning Commissi<Mier Sam Houston at 
a recent housing seminar. "You (the citizens) 
riiouki ask these p&tom nnuiing (or electlcm the 
questions" about enforctaig the minimum housing 
code. 

M(»t of the i»-raent members ctf the Vii^inia 
Beach City Council don't know wiqr ttw houang 
code is not enforced, althoi^ they reali» there Is a 

substandard hoi^ii^ problem in tlie Beach. And 
most say they see the ne^ to imiMxnre ttw city's 
iKXffiing, Iwt th^ "don't know what is ttw best at- 
tack to tlw i»-oUem." They are waiUi^ fw smneoM 
to p^sent th»n with tte statistics jiMcemii^ the 
ranber «i immes and pmvm invoh^ed— «id 
maybe the soMim to the sitettoi. 

In many cmbs, there seons to'be no tuwtr 

untaK ftmdb ten awttU>le to either rdabilitate 

pnaaH homti^ «* bidM more kiir*iiMN^Bte m- 

«Mne h(M!ws. I^e city Ims (mntiDUaUy shunned tlie 

(SmHOmmO,pag»A'S) 



Buses to roll again 
on expanded routes 



R.v I.INDA MILLER 
Sun Starr Writer 

You may soon be able to park 
that gas-eating automobile in 
the garage and take a bus to 
work. The buses will soon be 
back on the roads in Virginia 
Beach, and the expanded 
service is expected to be better 
than ever. 

ir all goes as planned, the 
Beach may have complete bus 
service restored by May 1. And 
that service will include five 
new neighborhood shuttle buses 
and two special bus routes to 
Norfolk Naval Base, as well as 
service along Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and an express bus 
to Norfolk. 

The Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday tentatively 
approved plans for the 
expanded mass transit system. 
The plans will be discussed at a 
meeting of the Tidewater 
Transportation District 
Commission (TTD) today. If 
agreements can be reached by. 
the Beach, the city of Norfolk, 
TTD and Norfolk's Tidewater 
Metro Transit Company 
(TMT). TMT drivers will man 
the bus service in Virginia 
Beach. (It has yet to be decided 
whether TTD will use Carolina 
trajlways buses or TMT buses. ) 

TIIK RRACH COUNCIL also 
tentatively agreed to underwrite 
the (x&i of ♦be bus servk;^ for 
the coming fiscal yeariTThe 
system is expected to coBf about 
$7«0.00ft toAfvrfltf, nnd t» city , 
Mtimates toat meti wttl .Wirit 
in about $S95,000 in faresiThat 
leaves the city with abAit a 
$165,000 bill for the service. 



Assistant to the City Manager 
George Tinnes told the Council 
the costs and revenues wiU be 
reviewed quarterly. Depending 
on what those evaluations show, 
the service may be altered or 
expanded. 

The fares for the bus service 
to Norfolk will range from 55 
cents to 75 cents, depending on 
how far a person lives from 
Norfolk. Fares for travel from 
one point in Virginia Beach to 
another will be 35 cents. 

TIIAI.IA. Kings Grant, 
Windsor Woods, the Lynnhaven 
Road area and the First 
Colonial-Great Neck areas will 
get the new shuttle service. 
Persons catching the First 
Colonial-Great Neck shuttle will 
be delivered to Virginia Beach 
Boulevard where they may 
trarefer free of charge to a 
Boulevard bus that will take 
them either to Princess Anne 
Plaza Shopping Center and then 
express to Norfolk via the 
Virginia Beach-Norfolk Toll 
Road or straight down the 
Boulevard to Norfolk. Other 
shuttle buses will deliver 
passengers to Princess Anne 
Plaza Shopping Center. The 
shuttle service will run on 35- 
minute intervals only during the 
peak traffic hours— between 6 
a.m. and 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 
p.m. and 6:25 p.m. 

The bus service to Norfoik 
Naval Base was included 
because of facts presented by 
t^e WfOi; N«V84 (WlSfrict 
eomrnahitant'a ^Jce Figurm 
compiled by the Navy show that 
8,000 potential bus riders to 
Sewell's Pdnt live in Virginia 



Beach. Of th(»e surveyed, 2,164 
said Ihey would ride the buses if 
available. The Navy has said it 
would encourage ridership by 
possibly limiting parking, 
rearranging working hours and 
advertising the new service. 

The plan calls for bus runs to 
the Naval Base from Princess 
Anne Plaza Shopping Center 
and from Independence 
Boulevard, via Shore Drive to 
Little Creek and then to" the 
Naval Base. 

An, HAY LOCAL service will 
be provided beginning at 81st 
Street and Oceanfront, down 
Virginia Beach Boulevard to 
Norfolk. Buses will run on 35- 
minute intervals during the 
peak traffic hours and 75- 
minute intervals during mid- 
day and early evening. Service 
will begin at 6 a.m. and the last 
bus to Norfolk will leave the 
Beach at 7:35 p.m. 

The express to Norfdk from 
Princess Anne Plaza Shopping 
Center will run only during peak 



hours. A bus beginning at Blst 
Street and Oceanfront will pick 
up passengers along Atlantic 
Avenue and Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and will deliver them 
to the Plaza Shopping Center 
where they may travel on the 
express bus to Norfolk. Buses 
will leave from the shopping 
center in the morning at 7:2S, 
7:55 and 8:25. Service returning 
from Norfolk will leave the 
central business district in the 
afternoon at 4:40, 5:10 and 5:40. 

(Before the Carolina 
Trailways bus drivers' strike, 
the Princess Anne Pl«« 
Express experiment to Noilcdk 
included five mm-ntng and five 
afternoon trips. The early 
morning and late afternoon 
routes have been deleted in this 
new plan because of lack of 
ridership.) 

The final deUt^s of the bus 
service are to be presented to 
the Beach Council April 29, at 
which time they are expected to 
sign a contract for the transit 
service. 



WWWWMWIIIII M Ii m i l l U HI I IIIII H IIIIIIWWW 



Historic sites 
now protected 



SUNBEAMS 



"The Sun it really growing. My family 
enjoys your new features." - G.O. Bay- 
sid« 

"Every Wednesday my day is made a 
little bit brij^ter by The Sun. An apt 
name for our Virj^nia Baadi Paper." - 
V.K., Princess Anne 

"I would rather xnd The Sun because 
I get more complete news." - A.C., Bay- 
side 



For home delivery phone 486-3430 



Inside This Wwk 



an^fied ;.. M 

Commwt ». A-2 

F^Mtturai A-6 

Forum .«.,.. A-2 

Gardening 84 

Lifestyles B-1 to B4 

Real Estate B-9 

Religion B-3 

Sports A-7 to A-^ 



With little discussion, the 
Virginia Beach ^ity Council 
Monday approved 8«ven 
historic buildings in the city to 
iie included, in a new protective 
hietoris ami 'cultural tSt^M^ 

The historic and cultural 
zoning district, established 
under the city's Comprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance, prohibits 
renovation or destruction of 
historic buildings without prior 
approval of the city. 

Those building included in the 
new protective zoning include: 

• Adam Keeling House, 
circa 1680, owned by Adm. L. J. 
Manees, in the Great Neck 
Point Area of Lynnhaven 
Borou^; 

• Thomas Murray House, 
circa 1784, owned by J. R. 
Tucker, in the Elizabeth River 
Shores area of Kempsville 
Borough; 

• Pembroke Man(N-, circa 
1764, owned by the Princess 
Anne Historical Society, off 
Constitution Avenue in the 
Bayside Borough; 

• Adam Thoroughgood 
House, circa 1636. owned by the 
City of Norfolk, in the 
Thoroughgood area ct Bayside 
Borough; . 

• Upper Wolfsnare, circa 
1759. owned by the Princess 
Anne Historical Society, in the 
Oceana Naval Air Station area 
of the Lynnhaven Borough; 

• Wishart House, circa 1640, 
owned by the Association for the 
Preservation of Virginia 
Antiquities, off Donation Drive 
in Bayside Borough: and, 

• Old Dcmation Church, 
circa 1736, owned by the 
Episcopal Church, in the 
Donation Shores area of 
Bayside Borough. 



Th^ Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission originally 
considered 16 buildings for the 
protective zoning district, but 
jm* of them wure dropped 
MetiWf at dbjoetlon mMh Mwir 
mhfra. Thoae deleted from 
consideration include 
Wolfsnare Plantation, Broad 
Bay Manw, Green Hill Farm, 
the Weblin House, the Jonathan 
Woodhouss Home, the Richard 
Murray House, Rose Haiti the 
Kempsville Jail and Pleasant 
Hall. 




coimcil 

Ttif Virginia Reach City 
Council met Monday for M 
minutes in closed session, 
Dfien to neither Uie pablic 
nor the press. The agenda 
listed "properly 
acquisition" and a "legal" 
matter for discussion. In 14 
meetings so far tills year, 
the CiMncll has nut for 
seven hours and 27 mhiHtea 
behind closed doors. 



Budget cuts hurt arts 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Wrtto- 

Memb«ti of the new aAs and Humanities Canmission 
five espnueA feellngi nngii^ from outrage to delight 
over funtft ^y are to reeeive under the city's proposed 
budget for fiscal year 1974-75, wWeh was released last 
week. 

Members of the oae arts organization whoae budget 
requCTt was not cut are understandably happy with the 
city. But rther members, whose budget cuts ranged frwn 
minor to drastic, are perplexed, hurt and ar^ry over what 
Oiey ccmsider shabby trratmeit from the ci^. 

The contmfssion came Into being last July wh«i tl« City 
CouikU appointed c1*wjs interested in the arts to serve 
e a group, to 'stiariate interest in the arts and 
humamties. The eomnuMiai was abo i^ up to channel 
requests for fui^ trtm arte groups to the aty Council. 

Also mdbi^up Ibe corominion are (kiegates elected 
by individual arte groups. 

SO FAR. th^bwnmission has received no funds frwn flte 
cl^, although it has be«i in existence for el0»t months. 

It has iBt received tte $1,000 apin^riation 
recrnnmaded by tbt Vir^nl* Beach Devekipinent 
CouneU ( wUch s^ up tte machinery for eetatrikhnMot of 
ttte CMMiMon) la Mardi 1972, no- Im It re<»ved a 
retJIicsM isn for operatim «penMS for ^ airwnt 
.year. 

ThecemmMeu's tottl requnt to the dty f(M- ftuMb for 
te»l yew lff74-'» was M4SI. It wtU imUad rec^ve 
fim M oudlned to the pvpoMd bwl^et. The requ^t 
iackidad indivkkal reqiMte from monber arte groive. 

or tint tmsmi, tbt.emririM requcsM $3,000 for 



itself. The request was cut to $800, The $3,000 was 
primarily to ^onscr an "arte aJid ffcwers" ortftfctien in 
the sprii« of 1975 to showcase the city's arte groups. The 
balance of the request was to be used for operating 
ecpenses for the fiscal year. ^ 

■niE VIRGINIA BKACH Friends of Miek: req^iested 
$2,500 to cover fees for guest artiste. Each year Uie 
Friends of Music sponsors a series of special aj^jearances 
by artiste in various musical fields. The request was cut 
by^flOO to $2,100. 

G. Staff wd Balderson, president (rf the Friends of 
Music, eiqwessed pu2ilement over the $400 cut. "I'm 
really curious as to why they cut it Otat amoimt," he said. 

The Friends d Music originally requested $2,900, twit 
that amount was reduced to $2,500 by the cwnmissiwi's 
bud^t finance committ^ before the total bud^t was 
submitted to the city. 

"We mi^t nrt be aWe to get scxne <rf the pet^ we 
wanted to get," Mr. Balderson said, "but we've never 
received any money befwe, so we can't be too glum about 
it." 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH Civic Symphony requested 
$4,000 from the city That was cut to COOO. The symphoiq? 
requestnl the funds to increase its size and be(»me self- 
aip^arting through recruitment irf more pirfenional 
muBteiam. 

Tbe symphony originalbp requited $6,750 wWch was 
recteed to $4,000 by the conmta^iB's txidget finance 
committee 

Dr. MiltMi SaiHiders. {rodent of ttie symphony, wm 
"shodted " to lean of Ow bw^M cuts. 



iM^^iM^teAi 



Mamt 



^B^^b«B 



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MM*riBtt«MMMfllttttfl 



Comment 



PagB A-2-TIm Suii^M«dnaid8y,J^pfil TO, 1974 



Anetfftoilat 



Out of Step 



For those whofeel the nation's interests are 
best served by represoitatives who espouse 
the ccHiservative ideology, you may take heart 
in the Virginia congressional delegation. A 
recent study by the Americans for 
Ckmstitutional Action, based on selected roll 
call votes in the House and Senate, found that 
Virginia had the most conservative 
congressional delegation. Virginia's was the 
only delegation where all monb^:^ rated in 
the conservative column. 

Nevertheless, the study reports that 
liberals colnprise the biggest group in 
Congress but {he middle-of-the-roaders hold 
the balance of power. 

Carry me back to old Virginia. 



Ciiyslde 



ByUndaHmer 





DIRTY WORDS 



Does freedom of speech 



7 



Gioupfbr Ervin protoct f oul languages 



rises at Forum 

A "Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the 
Forum,'* the title of a broadway comedy play 
se«ns particularly appropriate for the actions of a 
local political group. 

The Virginia Beach Forum, a political group 
formed to back "qualified" candidates in the May 7 
Virginia Beach City Council race, gave all the 
Council hopefuls an opportunity to impress its 
members. Now, the Forum, which began as a "non- 
partisan" group, has gotten down to serious 
business-printing Reid Ervin bumper stickers. 

The Forum candidates screening committee 
presented its recommendations for endorsements 
during a late night meeting last week. Not too 
surprisingly, the recommendations included en- 
dorsements for Reid , Ervin, Garland Isdell, 
Gaynette Winter anAPptrick Standing. The only 
endoreement surprise' JA'as Edward Lynk. 

But, the Forum mem|bership did not accept those 
recommendations as rapidly as some persons, like 
the Forum's leaders, might have expected. After 
allegations by Lynnhaven candidate John Griffin 
that Vice-mayor Reid Ervin had used his office for 
personal financial gain, some members expressed 
doubts about endorsing Mr. Ervin. 

AND OTHER FORUM members were disturbed 
by community comments and publicity that they 
were an "Ervin group" from the beginning. One 
protion <rf the group sought to wait till Mr. Ervin 
could answer the charges. Others moved not to 
endorse anyone in the Lynnhaven Borough race, 
Init that motion was defeated. 

"We started this organization about IVz months 
ago with the objective to emtorse and suf^rt 
qualified caiklidates, and we're never going to do 
the by ducking issues," one member said. And Mr. 
Ervin receiv^ the endorsement with 29 votes. 

Confusion marked the entire voting procedure. 
Some 40 members, whether distraught by the "high 
schoolish" procedure or tired due to the late hour. 
Mi befra-e all the voting was complet^fl. 

EDWARD'S LYNK'S endorsement brought on 
the meeting's second biggest furor. The discussion 
got so long and involved that Forum President 
Robert Warren called for "a recess so we don't 
have to use parliamentary procedure." 

Peter Joy's name was also mentioned, but one 
member of the candidates screening committee 
admitted that "while he is a young man with a lot of 
good ideas, I don't have faiUi in him because (A his 
a^." Cecily Macdonald's name was then thrown 
into the ring, but a motion to substitute her name 
for Mr. Lynk's received only seven votes. Mr. Lynk 
finally got the endorsement after a neighbor of his 
expounded upon his virtues. 

.m MEMBERSHIP appeared frustrated and 

ely sqO^tzed out enough vot^ for that en- 

dm^ment. Endorsements for Patrick Standing 
and Garland Isdelf (Kemi^ville) came a little 
easier, but the Forum was again tossed into a 
dilemma over the endorsement of Gaynette Wintw 
for tte Bayside Borough. 

Once they decicted tiiat Aey didp't care what 
anyone said about their group, they endm^ed Ms. 
Winter. Tha^ has be^ some af^tiny from ottier 
candiates over the fact that Ms. Winter was an 
(rffic«- of the Forum {wior to announcing fw the 
Council race. 

When the voting was over, mast members heaved 
heavy sighs as they looked ahead to fund-raisi^, 
precinct campaigning and publicity lor "their" 
candidates. (Mo^t of "their" candidates barely 
e^Eed f»A a two^hirds vote of support fran the 
membersUp, however.) 

Ami as the groiq) (teparted Princes Anne High 
School about 11:30 p.m., one member was 
ovHt^tfd to say to anottior, "now aren't jmi gUKl 
you jBkatA the Foiim?" 
^ — 



aNm/un 



jU Jwi^mdmt JVwwjpapw 



DAVID It SiAn 



stanmXrtin 



l«ALBRITT(WSIMS 



MMMA LiA OUIAKtR 



JMMSC MOWN 

Ol iii t ilinl tririir 



By LAWRENCE VELVEL 
Special to The Sun 

On Oct 9, 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court 
reversed the conviction of a taxi driver 
who had been prosecuted under an Ohio 
statute for making extremely foul sexual 
remarks tp a female passenger. In a brief 
opinion, the Court cursorily adverted to 
the principle that a conviction cannot 
stand if it was obtained under a statute 
which is so broad that it threatens 
constitutionally protected speech as well 
as unprotected speech. 

The taxicab driver's case was the latest 
in a recent string of First Amendment 
decisions on the use of foul language. In 
ttiese decisions the Court has generally 
protected the use (rf such speech. Since ttie 
language was used tar no fit purpose in me 
driver's cBse, it is difficult to think of gd$d 
rrasons wl^ the Court dMuld hfre 
protected it, unless one aeeejAa JusQce 
William 0. Douglas' absolutist view that 
the First Amendment forbids il^he 
punishment of any speech whatsoever. But 
in most of the other recent decisions, the 
foul language was used to make a political 
protest (H- as part of some statement on 
political or social affairs. 

In one case, for exan^le, a young man 
wore a jacket saying "F- the Draft" In 
another, a University of Missouri student 
. had distributed a newspaper canTing a 
cartoon showing pdicemen rairnig Uie 
Statue of Liberty and the Goddess of 
Justice, witti the caption "With Liberty 
and Justice for AH." The pap«r also 
carried a headline saying "M — F — 
Acquitted," referring to an acquittal of a 
meml>er of an organization called Up 
Against the Wall M — F — . In stiU 
another case, during a pditical meeting 
the defendant had referred to the police as 
"M — F — fascist pig cops." 

IN THESE CASES involving political 
mattws, there were good reasorei for 
protecting the style of speech that was 
used. First if government is allowed to 
punish the style of speech, there is a 
conaderable risk that it will end up 
supfHVSsing ideas in tte process. Indeed it 
is one of the oldest {rioys in the book to 
claim that somebody is being punished not 
for what he says, but for the way he says It 

Lawrence Velvet teaches comtitutional 
bw at the CathoUc Untverrity School of 
Law In WaAington, D.C. 



Secondly, woitb like those that were used 
are sometimes chosen for their emotional 
force, and such impact is a very impwtant 
element <rf speech. Finally, whether or not 
certain words are offensive is really a 
matter of personal taste, and it is therdore 
difficult to conceive of any principled way 
by which to draw a line as to which words 
will be permitted and which won't 

While the Court majority has protected 
speech in the above cases, the Justices 
appointed by President Nbcon have usually 
dissented. In dmng so they have displayed 
some very dangerous tendencies, because 
they have shown that they are willing and 
even eager to criticize and . condemn 
speech or groups which they do not happen 
to like. In the jacket case, for example, 
Justice Harry Blackmon said that wearing 
the jacket should not be protected since it 
was wily an "rt>surd and immature 
!jp$ti«'^n> ^ University of.Missfpui case. 
Jusflce Warren Buiver said diat the 
newspaper being distributed was "obscene 
and infantile," and that universities exist 
not merely for the discussimi of ideas, but 
also to teach students to express 
themselves "in acceptable, civO terms" so 
that they "may learn the self restraint 
necessary to the functioning of a civilized 
society." No South American general 
could have more eloquently stated the 
junta mentality that universities exist to 
tranquilize and domesticate the students. 
(I notice, incidentally, that Mr. Burger 
seems to make a habit of blasting radical 
lawyers or students for a lack of civility, or 
The New Yoik Times for a lade of 
responsibility, but I do not remember him 
talking about the obligation ctf government 
officiate to act honestly and decently.) 

ALSO IN THE Missouri case. Justice 
William Rehnquist stressed the fact that 
die petitioner was a professional student 
who had been making poor academic 
progress but had previously distributed 
radical publications that contained 
naughty words life f— and bulls—. Mr. 
Rehnquist went on to emphasize that even 
if such a person could not be criminally 
(HTosecuted for districting the paper 
containing the cartoon and the headline, 
certainly she could at least be thrown out 
of school for distributing papers 
containii^ such bad language. ^ 

It is clear that Uke Mr. Bur^r, he 
believes that universities are a place to 
aomesticate people, a belief which is 
totally at odds with the utdversities' 



proper mission 
independent thought 



of encouraging 



, Finally, in referrii^ to the kinds of 
wwds we are discussing. Justice Lewis 
Powell has lamented that although "one of 
the hallmarks of a civilized society is the 
level and quality of discourse," 
nevertheless "we have witaessed in recent 
years a disquieting deterioration in 
standards of taste and civility in speech." 
Of course Mr. Powell did not mention the 
incredible governmental actions which 
have driven people to u^ the language to 
which he objects. Nw did he mention the 
government's own perversion of the 
English language in recent years— its 
invention of countless terms like "advance 
protective reaction" bs a euphemism for 
bombing pQ}jpli,'Nbr did he recopae tha t 
if we are becani|)g Jess civilized,^^ is not 
so much MJtWMi^^t^lie^pNi^^ho art 
using bad words, but to the actions of the 
establishment <A which he is such a leading 
meml>er. 

THE PEOPLE WHO use words Mr. 
Powell doesn't like are not the ones who 
debased our civilization by causing 
hundreds of Oiousands (A deaths in 
Vietnam, or breaking into Watergate, or 
fomenting racial discriminatimi or ruining 
the environment. It was Mr. Powell's 
"civUized" establishment which did these 
things. 

It seems that the Nbcon Justices' 
foregoing judicial sentiments lead 
inescapably to the conclusim that they 
share conservative white society's 
|x-ejudice — or hypocrisy — about the use 
of certain words. Furthermore since it is 
no secret that the words are heavily used 
Ijy particular social groups — or at least it 
is members of particular groups who are 
most often punished for using the words — 
one wonders whether the Nixon Justices 
share the prejudices against such groups 
and are simply using their official positiiHi 
to aid in punishing them. 

Be this as it may, the mere fact that tiie 
Nbcon judges are willing to permit political 
and social speech to be punished because 
objectionable words are used is anotho- 
demonstration that they have a relatively 
low commitm«it to the First Amendment 
and indeed, are dangerous to it. 



Forum 



ie«y* 




•«^' 



WACNfUMMMSOOWOmnON 



ti^tt^^^mmmrm^ 



Letters from 
our readers 



strikes for Ervin 

Sirs: 

The Virginia Beach Fwum (wH rdated to Tlie 
Sun's letters to the editor column) stril^ i^ain. 
With over-emi^Mas m mrt beii% pditiaafy aUgned 
witti any groiv «r factton, the fum Ervin-«i1mted 
poUtioil mac^ne marchra on. Maiqf good pMple 
bdoi% to tbk M'^ito^n ami we decfeated in 
their prioct|de. Ait, becnise the majority of the 
(dicers and a M (rf flw menbors we posonal 
frimdb of Ifr Ervin, ttw balaaoe ol ttie mem- 
bers^ win be brahnmhed to wAttsA cuddiAes 



You can bet that Patrick L. Standing and Reid 
Ervin will be two of the endorsed candidates (rf this 
Forum. At the meeting held at Princess Araie High 
School on March 26, Gaytrette Winter announced 
that since she was a former officer of the Forum, 
she would rattier have no €ndorsem«it for the 
Bayside Boroi^. WhUe Dr. aarence Holland, the 
other candidate from'ISayside, is well qualified, he 
will not be endorsed because of Ms. Winter's in- 
fluence. Mr. Ervift was the only incumbent at- 
tentbng this me^ng because the other incumbents 
know they are wasting their time and the endcn-sees 
have already been picked. 

Two years ago, this same organization was 
kmmn by a differait name and at that time en- 
ctorsed Mr. Ervin's hand-pidted candidates. If this 
is Unily a nonpartisan group, where were they in the 
House di Delegate and Senate race last year? It 
would a^iear they only crop up in City CouncO 
ra<»8 when Mr. Ernn or some <rf his frieiufa are 
running f«- (rffice. 

I h(^ that at smne future time a truly mm- 
partisan groiq) will be formed in Virginia Beach 
that can and will be effective in the selection of 
q^lified candidates. 

^ CharlteC^eland 

(MtBtor'i note: At Ae meetbig ofA^ 2, Mr. StmuUng, 
m. St^ Mt. VkMr. EdwvdLytOcmidGmkmilKMwm 
lfyduFonim.f 



The^n wtleomH aK 1mm fivm ttt Ifcwl- 
ML Nmnet h« i« ytt M Wtf om regi^t, but 
pkue Inek^ your nam mti tele p hone imm- 
^ wUk jww Utm. letmt me m^e to 
<dU«r to meet ruwtpapm Ityk mid tpt^n- 
(pitimmTi WrUe: Fmm, n^it^ BttA SM, 
>»• i> „* m A nt PA n^tkBeaek.'Va. 23451 




Tidings 

By 

'Neat 
Sims 

Sun Editor 

We're all vital 
to Mr. Huxtable 

In the beginning was your birth certificate, and 
without it you do not exist - at least legally. 

And as if illegal existence is not bad enough, that 
sheet of paper is proof of age for employment and 
marriage, and it protects your rights to 
inheritance, insurance claims, property and social 
security benefits. 

It is the first a1id most important page of an 
individual's "book of life," as Deane Huxtable calls 
it. Mr. Huxtable is state registrar and director of 
the State Health Department's Bureau of Vital 
Records and Health Statistics. 

"WHEN YOU THINK about it, it's your deed to 
American citizenship," he said. Mr. Huxtable 
points out that naturalized citizens, upon com- 
pletion of certain requirements, receive a Cer- 
tificate of Citizenship. But natural-bom Americans 
have only their birth certificate to prove citizen- 
ship. 

Unless information contained in a birth cer- 
tificate can be proven in error, the certificate must 
be accepted by administrative bodies and the 
Courts. On man, Mr. Huxtable recalls, attempted to 
use a fradualent birth certificate to prevent the 
division of his deceased father's estate. The man 
tried to prove he was his own father by requesting 
a birth certificate in his father's name. Eventually, 
after a long legal battle the record was proven in 
error. 

Under the guidance of Mr. Huxtable, Virginia is 
participating in a national attempt at stian- 
dardization of birth records. The absence of any 
federal law regarding the registration of vital 
events causes problems, he says. To help solve the 
problems, vital statisticians are experimenting 
with a system where birth cerificates are labeled 
with an U-digit number 

THE FIRST DIGIT would identify the counbry 
of birth. Naturally, the United States has chosen ttie 
number "1". Canada is considering number "2" 
(we cap't all be first), and Latin American coun- 
tries have shown an interest in an international 
identifier. 

The second and third numbers would identify the 
state Virginia is 45. The next two numbers are the 
year of birth, and the final six digits record the 
numerical order in which the birth was filed. 
According to Mr. Huxtable, no number could be 
duplicated within 100 years. If you live more than a 
century, however, watch out for some newborn 
toddler laying claim to your social security 
payments. 

The birth number is also part of another concept 
called "Record Linkage". Limited information- 
such as birth, death, marriage, divorce and 
medical records— would be filed in a central system 
tied together by use of the birth number. 

DESPITE THE "big brother" aspect of such a 
data bank, Mr. Huxtable says the proposed system 
would have benefits. "A Virginia man or woman is 
knocked unconscious in a car wreck in California," 
be supposes. "The doctor trying to save that per- 
son's life could query a central computer and have 
the complete medical history in minutes." That is, 
of course, if the doctor knew your numt)er. 

Today, Mr. Huxtable's bureau has over nine 
million vital records on file, some from as far back 
as 1853. He has a staff of more than 100 and a 
biennial budget of $1 million. 

For the record (which must be one of Mr. 
Huxtable's favorite saying), the keeper of every 
native Virginian's "book of life" is considered an 
international authority on vital statistics systems. 
And most likely, he's also an expert on file cabinets. 



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HASSLES 




The greening of 
the Mack thumb 



I have a terrible, secret affUctira. 

It's a curse I've tried to hide, but THEY know 
I've got it. 

I call it the curse of the black thumb. People who 
have black thumbs (as imposed to green thumbs) 
can be spotted instantly by green growing things. 

I'm one of the few pe<^le in the wwld who can go 
into a nursery and start the plants wilting even 
before I can ask, "What have you got in a nice 
philodendron?" 

PLANTS IIATK me. I really don't know why. I 
try to be nice to them, I really do. I do all the things 
the plant experts say to do. 

I water my plants... and they die. I feed my 
plants nourishing plant food.. .and they die. I shield 
them from the direct sun. ..and they die. I put them 
in the sun ...and they die. I play music for them, I 
talk to them, I fondle them, I read bodes about 
them. ..and still they die. 

There is a lorcUy philodendron at the office 
across the hall that mocks me every day. That plant 
knows about me. I can feel it. It sits over there in 
"the office window and grows. 

THAT'S ALL IT does all day. It grows and grows 
and grows. That plant is going to take over the 
building some day. just you wait. 

What really bugs me about that growing, 
multiplying plant is that it was started from a little 
root— just a little root in water. And it kept getting 
bigger and bigger and spreading and climbing until 
it's overpowered the office. 

Now if I'd tried to grow that plant from a root I 
would have ended up with just that— a soggy, moldy 
old root in some nasty, brackish water. Ugh. 

I have three plants right now, and I'm really 
trying. I went to the plant place and told them about 
my black thumb affliction. They sympathized and 
sold me plants they swore were rated excellent in 
hardiness. It even says so on the plant care chart 
they gave me. 

SO WHAT 1 want to know is, if they're so hardy, 
why are they all dying? 

I've even got them underlined in the plant care 
chart with little check marks by the light they need 
(low to good), the watering tiiiey require 
(moderate) and the temperature they prefer 
(warm.) 

I had a bit of trouble with the temperature part 
this winter, Uiough, so maybe that's what's wrong. 
Vepco and the President kept telling me to turn my 
thermostat down to 68 de^ees, which I did. But 
-Vepco and the Pr^ident forgot to tell the plants 
about it, so maybe they're dying out of spite. 

I HAVE BEGUN to suspect that I've been 
listening to too many experts. One plant expert told 
me that plants are happy in plastic pots but want, 
warm water. 

Another told me that plants should go into clay 
pots and never in plastic. That expert also told me 
plants don't give a hoot whether their water is 
warm or cold. 

Another expert told me plants do fine with plain 
old Norfolk-supplied tap water. Different advice 
came from another plant person, who said I should 
catch soft rain water for them. 

ONE TIME I moved one of my plants to what I 
thought was a better location. But when it started 
doing poorly I went back to the plant place to 
inquire about its health. 

They said "Whatever you do, just don't move it. 
They hate that." So I wondered, should I move it 
back to where it was, hewing it wouldn't notice I'd 
moved it, or should I leave it in the new location 
since I'd moved it? 

Since I learned about my black thumb, those 
green plastic plants that I used to think were so 
tacky are lodging better 'all the time. All you have to 
do for them is dust- them once in a while. 



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roee/ 



by Rod ■oftii 




An 8-year-old boy shouldn't be too skep-" 
tical about life but skepticism is exactly 
what the look on Bernie Smith 's face seems 
to convey. Bernie struck this nonchalant 



pose in his third-grade classroom at New- 
town Road Elementary School He lives in 
the Lake Edward area of Virginia Beach. 




•NO GROWTH"OR**KNOW GROWTH ??? 

Who could ever have guessed 
it would get this bad? 

• Anyone who had their hands on population projections ten years ago. Anyone who had 
taken a moment to study the development along the urban corridors in Virginia Beach five years ago. 
Anyone who took a moment to reflect on the beauty of our beaches would have known that 
thousands of tourists wduld visit our city each year. 

• Our streets are jammed and our facilities are taxed because we didn't plan for population in- 
creases we knew were coming. We didn't plan the highways and facilities to accommodate the 
thousands of tourists we encourage to visit our city each year. The picture for the next ten years is no 
secret either. Babies are still being born and hundreds of thousands of dollars are spent each year to 
attract additional tourism. 



• Housing will become even more critical in the futtire. It is iro"'ca','hat some community 
leaders call for a moratorium on housing on one hand and encourage or bu'l^^h^'sand motels 10 
attract tourists on the other hand. Where will the employees live? Where will the policemen he 
firemen and others llv^f An.exodus to Chesapeake or other areas for needed housing won t solvejhe 
problem - people still use the highways to get to work. 

• Our city has taken a step toward the future with the recently proposed capital improvements 
plan and the "plan for planning". A step that may falter unless the voice of the people ensures our 
city government has vision and is sensible about growth. 

We've got to plan 
for the people. 





TIDEWATER BUILDERS ASSOCIATION 

5665 EAST VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
NORFOLK. VIRGINIA 23502 



Sensible Growth 

Because no growth makes no sense at all. 



"nie Sun-Wednesday, April 10, 1974-nife A-3 

Roll 'om 

Film captjures , 
'real' military 

Smile! You may be on camera! 

A film pro<hiction company from Los Angeles is 
filming all over Virginia Beach and the East Coast. 

The company, Kinema Productions Inc., has 
been here since last sumoner and plans to stay two 
more years. About 125 production company em- 
ployes are living temporarily in Virginia Beach and 
Tidewater, said Doug Morgan, owner of Kimena 
Productions. 

THK FILIVI PEOPLK are here to produce a series 
of 15 documentary films about the military ser- 
vices. Ten of the documentaries have been com- 
missioned by the Pentagon, Mr. Morgan said. The 
documentaries will show what the service today is 
about, he said. 

"It will not be propaganda," he said. "We're 
going to tell it like it is." 

He said they plan to film at all the military in- 
stallations in Virginia Beach, as well as other in the 
Norfolk area and the Carolinas. 

FIVK OF THK documentaries on the military 
will be shown on television, he said. The five for TV 
arc designed to "convey to the public exactly what 
(he service is like," he said. 

"The public doesn't understand what the military 
is like. They don't know what's good and bad about 
it. These films might change their views of the 
service," he said. 

While the film people are here, they are also 
filming highlights of Virginia and surrounding 
states to be used in a series on all the stated in the 
union. 



- - — .^.^.^^^^.^^.^^^^^.^.^.^^^^^^m^^ 



fagg A-4-TlieJun-Wedn«8day, April 10, 1974 




Shop In Your Own Backyard! 



POLLARD'S is a name well 
known in the Tidewater area. 
Family owned and operated, 
they also have three locations in 
Norfolk. The catering service 
they offer is a must for the next 
wedding, party or banquet you 
have. 



DEHART REALTY can help 
with any real estate problem 
you have, be it selling, buying, 
renting, etc. Their complete 
staff of salesmen, headed by 
Fred Soles, manager, is ready 
day or night with friendly, 
personalized service. 



LONDON BRIDGE 
HARDWARE is the place to go 
for "One-St(v Shopping" for 
lawn and garden supplies. They 
carry everything from the 
fertilizer, (authorized Neutro 
Fertilizer Dealer), to the 
machinery to put it in! Many 
home improvement services 
also offered. 



TIDEWATER KAWASAKI can 

help you during the ^soline 
crisis! Why not travd on a 
Kawasaki, it's cheaper. They 
feature a complete line of 
isycles, and parts. Their service 
department will keep yov on the 
road safely and happily. You're 
ahead on a Kawasaki! 



I^NDRY'S is a country-type 
store, providing fresh eggs from 
their own chickens, fresh 
(x-oduce, plants and flowers, 
seeds, all types of general 
merchandise. You'll have to see 
the [dace to believe it! 




IN THE HEART 
OF LONDON BRIDGE 

For All Your 
Real Estate Needs, 

i CALL i 



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1 16 London Bridg* Shopping Canter 
Vlrglnta BMch. Va. 



BEACH OFFICE MACHINES 

Sales ^ Service > Rentals 

AND NOW! 

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CONTPLETE SELECTION 
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Save gas. Buy everything you 
^^ neeil at UNDRY'S. 
Garden Supplies 
Seed & Feed 
Fertilizer- Plants 
Retail Groceries 
Fresh Produce 
Hardware • Tools 
Paint- Rollers, Etc. 

LANDRY'S 

EGG & PRODUCE AAARKET 

10€1 London Bridge Rd. 

Phone 427-3549 




JIM HAYDEN LINCOLN 
MERCURY an establishment of 
five years offers a complete line 
of Lincolns, Mercurys, Marlt 
TVs, Lincoln Continentals, 
Mercurys, Cougars, Comets, 
and Capris. Jim Hayden, Owner 
and Manager, and General 
Manager, Eniil Serlick invite 
you to stop by for professional 
automotive assistance and 
complete service facilities. 



BEACH OFFICE MACHINES 

can sell or rent you any type of 
office supplies. They carry 
everything from the typewriter 
that can't spelf to the pencil 
eraser. They have the 
friendliest staff in town! 




SAVEGASI 

DRIVE SAFELY WITH 

CAPRI 1 

JIM HAYDEN Lincoln Mercury, Inc. 
^ 2375 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

/ PHONE 340-0800 



TIDEWATER 
KAWASAKI 



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Many Models 
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Coiti0 in for demonstration 

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CHICKEN 

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food dinners, delectable 

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Next Week in the 



"Biiiiii/iin 



'^f 



■rmw^ %««. 



Housing 



^Continued from page A-1) 

thought of federal 

funds for local tMHtsmg projects. 
They have even turned down 
money for city planning 
t)ecause of "housing survey 
strings." Some persons say that 
the money was not accepted 
because the city did not talce the 
time to investigate its use— they 
just saw the word housing and 
backed off for fear of 
involvement in housing 
development. One member of 
the planning department, 
however, says part of the 
problem was the timing of the 
offers. During the work on the 
city's Comprehensive Zoning 
Ordinance, there was no staff 
available to complete the 
necessary housing survey and 
torms to a Hew the Beach to get 
the federal money. 

soMk of THK city fathers 
have also expressed concern 
that construction of more low- 
moderate incftme homes in the 
city might attract persons from 
other cities. But, even in the few 
low-moderate income housing 
projects in the city, applicants 
are carefully screened, and few 
persons from outside Virginia 
Beach are accepted for Beach 
housing. 

"There is fear, and 
understandably so, on the part 
of some people that to construct 
more lower income housing will 



open up Vin(inia Beach to the 
problems of Norfolk and dOxr 
cities." says Fred Hodges, 
manager of the Atlantis 
Apartments. "But. that doesn't 
mean that housing should be 
denied to pers(u» who already 
liw hm" * 

Public housing— where )he 
city would establish a housing 
authort^is the last 
alternative in the minds of most 
City ,j CJibncilmen. One 
councilman, who asked not to 
be identified, says "With the 
city's growth we're not going to 
have any choice but to establish 
a housing authority in the 
future." Another councilman 
saiifhe would favor renovating 
the existing structures where 
possible. But, that takes federal 
funds which are Hmited right 
now. 

MOST OF THE Council 
favors private in^u^stry getting 
into low-moderate income 
development, possibly with use 
of federal subsidy programs. 
Funds for federally subsidized 
housing projects are no longer 
available since President 
Richard Nixon froze all federal 
housing money last year. And 
persons in the building industry 
say the cost of building 
materials has soared so high in 
the last few yean, it is 
impossible to produce a house 
that they can financially 
market and make it available to 



'^oem 




Just a fleeting moment in the Ihustle 
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those memorable, touching moments 
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completely professional candid 
accuracy. 

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4221 Virginia Beach Blvd. at Thalia- Phona 486-5416 
t 





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persons on low fixed incomes. 

"A builder really has no 
preference as to what kind of 
housing he builds, as long as he 
can market it," says Ted 
Schlossman, president of the 
Association of Tidewater 
Homebuilders. "The private 
building industry is ready, 
willii^ and able to provide the 
housing, but the federal 
government has A 

responsibility, and they are not 
meeting that re^Kinsihility. The 
problem is getting the people to 
be able to afford the housing." 
(Mr. Schloramanestimates that 
with the cost of land and 
building expenses, a home 
cannot be constructed in the 
Beftch for less than $30,000.) 

Lawrence Sancilio, president 
of the Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce and president of 
Larasan Realty agrees that 
while the builders are willing, 
federal subsidy o( same sort is 
the only answer. 

"FREE ENTERPRISE 

should take care <A all the 
housing needs." says Mr. 
Sancilio. "The problem is that 
the cost of. materials and labor 
and the stringent requirements 
placed on the builder by the 
municipality have put the cost 
of housing at such a high level. 
The federal government could, 
through direct subsidy to a 



person, gfve that person the 
benefit at rentil^ m hopefully 
buying k hone." 

And direct cash assistance k 
exactly what President Nixon 
said the federal government 
was considering in a speech on 
housing in September 1973. 
"Under the new approach 
(direct cash assistance), the 
federal government would 
provide qualified recipients 
with ail apprt^riate housing 
payment and wouM then let 
them choose th^rown homes on 
the private market," President 
Nixon said. 

The Dq;>artnient Housing and 
Urban Development is also 
studying the possibility of 
special reveraie sharing funds 
for housing that wouM be given 
to the cities to deal with the 
|H-(d>Iem locally. 

TiKre's no doubt that clearing 
up the substandard housing 
situation hinges on building 
more low-moderate income 
housing. The people living in the 
rotting houses look to the city. 
The city looks to the private 
builders, and the private 
builders look to the federal 
government. 

If and when the direct cash 
assistance program goes into 
effect or the city gets special 
housing funds, some (rf the 
substandard housing |»-oblems 
in the dty could be solved 



ROLL CALL 



WASHINGTON- Htre's how area 
membcrt M Congress were recorded on 
major roll call voles March » through 
April 3. • ' 

>. House 

INTERNAL SECURITY: Passed, 247 
for and 8« against, a resolution to give the 
House Internal Security Committee, 
tormerlyjhe Committee on Un American 
Activities>-«perafing money lor the 
remainder ol Ivu. 

Those voting against wanted to aMIish 
the controversial committee. 

Supporters of the resolution (H. Res. 
937) argued that Congress must iteep 
watch on allegebly subversive and 
terrorist activities in the United Stales. 
Some argued that ttie continuing effort to 
abolish HiSC is orchestrated by 
Communists. 

Rep. Richard Ichord ID Mo), committee 
chairman, said Congress benefits from 
"the accurate Information" collecled on 
"kookle revolutionary" organliations, 
such as the Black Panthers and SDS. 

Opponents argued that the committee Is 
a cold war relic and performs watchdog 
duties better handled by the FBI. They 
said the committee's files on citliens art a 
dangerous invasion of privacy. 

Rep. Rdbert Drinan (DMass) said that 
members who vote for "are implicitly 
voting for terrorism." 

Reps. Knomas "Downing (Oil. William 
Whitehurst (R 2). Davlb Satterfield (D<3), 
W.C. Daniel IDS), Caldwell Butler (R.7), 
Kenneth Robinson (R-61, Stanford Parris 
,R». William Wampler (R «) and Joel 
Broyhill (R II) voted "yea." 

Rep. Robert Daniel (R 4) did not vote. 

CONSUMER'S AGENCY: Reiected, 176 
lor and 223 against, a move to weal«n the 
bill to create a Consumer Protection 
Agency). The overall bill (H,R:.mg' f" 
later paiaed and sent t*>fM^MMll. ' ' 

The agency would r*prpt«ftt egnMimers 
in court by suing buslneues alleged to 
advertise deceptively or sell unsafe 
products. It would get broad powers to 
enlist other agencies- soch as the Federal 
Trade Commission- in, lis litigation. 

The rejected amendment would have 
limited the CPA's access to information 
(such as trade secrets), restricted lis 
courtroom options and applied the bill's 
provisions to labor unions as well as 
businesses. 

The bill was lobbied intensively. The 
Administration hoped to weaken the bill, 
Nader representatives opposed any 
weakening, and the National Association 
of iWanufacturtrs "totally apposed" the 
concept of the agency. 

Supporters said the relected amendment 
was a "responsible alternative" to 
creating an agency to "ride herd" on 
American businats, and argued against 
creating "another commission" to "tell 
people how to live." 

exponents argued that limiting the 
agency's judicial standing would "gut the 
bill," which'ls a compromise worked out 
after five years of seeking consumer 
protection legislation. , 

Downing, Whitehurst, Satterfield, 
Robert Daniel, W.C Daniel, Butler, 
Robinson, Parris. Wampler and Broyhill 
voted "yea." 

'(MILITARY BONUSES: Rejected, 194 
for and 201 against, an amendment to 
eliminate proposed bonuses to attract 
dentists, optometrists and veterlnarKlns 
into the miiitwy. The amendment would 
have.ijmited bonuses to medical doctors. 

The overall bill (S. 2770) was requested 
by the Defense Department to meet 
shortages of doctors In the volunteer 
army. The House Armed Services 
Committee added bonuses for other types 
of doctors. 

The bill sets discretionary enlistment 
bonuses of up to t1S,000, at a maximum 
cost of SIM million per fiscal ye«r. 

ThOM voting for said the additional 
bonuses will waste S3I million per year, 
and are opposed by the Defense 
Department Rep. Les Aspin (DWis) 
called them 'Urnamenls on a Chrtatmas 
tree." Some members argued that doctor 
shortages in civilian society are more 
critical than In the military. 

Opponents argued that shortages of 
health officers will cause soldiers to seek 
out private practitioners, at taxpayer 
expense. Rep. Robert Leggett (DCallf) 
said this would make the taxpayer! "pay it 
back in spades." 

Downing, Whitehurst, Satterfield, 
Robert Daniel, w.C. Daniel, Roblnssn, 
Parris, Wampler and Broyhill voted 
■may." 
r-^ Butler did no* vote. 

" SENATE 

FINANCIAL OflCLOSURE: Refused, 
34 for and SS against, to table an 
amendment tttal raquires c^ndklates far 
federal o(fi» to dlsck)*# how much 
federal, slate and local income and 
property taxes they pay. After daf sating 
the move to kill the amendment, the 
Senate added the requirement fo the 
campaign Jioanclng reform bill (S. 39441.' 

The anffndment expand* the bill's 
financial discloaure provisions, which also 
call lor disclosure of sources of income, if 
the language becomes law, the only tax 




FLOWERS— WAYNE JONES 



I Quality 



• Sarvice 



Dependability 



Exquisite 

Easter and Spring 

Flowers and Plants 

428-2W1 



329 LaMn Rd. 
9:00 - 5:^ 
DaUy Mon..SM. 




Information lo remain private will be 
deductions a candidate claims, including 
donations lo charities. 

Supporters of tabling, and thus killing, 
the tax diKlosure language argued that 
candidates for President, Senate and 
House deserve privacy. 

Opponents argued that the public must 
be convinced that the vast majority of 
elected officials "abide by the laws they 
make .and administer." 

Sen. Harry Byrd (I) voted "yea." Sen. 
William Scott (R) did not vote. 

ELECTIOir RESULT ANNOUNCE- 
MENTS: Passed, 43 for and 38 against, an 
amendment to prohibit releasing results of 
presidential elections until midnight 
Eastern Standard Time. 

The amendment was added to the 
campaign financing reform bill. Its thrust 
is to halt media projections of victory and 
defeat based on incomplete returns from 
eastern precincts. 

Supporters argued that such predictions 
can influence election results in western 
time tones. They said a western state 
voter, when told his candidate has lost, 
may not vote. 

Opponents argued that enlorcing the 
proposed law would be Impossible. Other 
senators argued ll<at the amendment will 
not slop media projections and, therefore, 
should be referred to committee for 
further study. 

Byrd voted "nay" and Scott did not vote. 

SENATOR''S INCOME: Tabled, «l for 
and 31 against, an amendment to bar 
senators and representatives from 
accepting payment for speaking 
engagements or writing books, except for 
"out of pocket" expenses. The 
honorarium ban was offered to the 
campaign financing reform bill. 

Jhe amendment was loaded down on ap 
earlier vote with'tanguage to bar Members 
ol Congress from gaining Income from any 
source that is subsidized by the federal 
qovernment. Including dividend income 
Irem a bank that lias federal deposit 
Insurance, or stock dividends from a 
federal contractor. 

Supporters of tabling and thus ki Ming the 
amendment generally argued that 
members should have the right, to gain 
income from private sources. 

Opponents generally argued that being 
an elected official is a tuiltlme occupation, 
and that restricting member's income to 
federal paychecks would guard against 
conflicts of interest 

Byra voted "yea" and Scott did not vote. 

POLITICAL ADVERTISINO: Relected, 
29 for and 52 against, an amendment to 
require newspapers and other rpini media 
to keep, records of paid political 
advertisements, and to send the records to 
the lederal government for pubiicatiiin 
pr.l«r to electkm days. 

The amendment was offered to the 
campaign financing reform bill, which 
already would require; the broadcast 
media to keep such records, but does not 
require transmitting the records to the 
government. 

The thrust of the amendment was to 
double check candidates' reports of money 
spent on advartlsino, as called for by the 
bill. 

Supporters argued Wt such a check 
would assure accurate records. They said 
that sending the records to a central 
local kin would expedite the process. 

Opponents argued against making the 
preiaan eaforclngarm of tha government. 
Sen. Lowell Welcker (R Conn) said the 
government can not force "the proH to be 
cMidid." 

Byrd voted "yea" and Scott did not vote. 




Suar-yedimday. April 10, 1974-Fi^e A-S 



on panda 
at lunch 

if you spy a luncher in 
the Cavalier Ocean- 
front's Sunbreila Room 
spearing his ear with his 
fork, it might be .that 
he's trying to eat lunch 
while keeping an eye on, 
the models strolling 
around the tables 
showing the newest In 
fashions. The fashion 
show started about a 
month ago hnd con- 
tinues every Thursday 
from noon to 2 p.m. 
Fashions and models 
are. from two f hops In 
the Cavalier. (Sun 
photo by Rod IMann) 



Less gasoline 
will not affect 
tourism: FEO 







By LILLIAN PFAFF 
.Special to The Sun 

WASHINGTON - The 
Kderal Energy Office (FEO) 
predicts that the level of 
gasoline shortages for the 
remainder of 1974 should have 
no damaging effects on the 
tourist industry. 

Assuming imports return to 
pre-embargo levels, gasoline 
supplies will be only four to six 
per cent short of demand. Dr. 
John Sawhill, Deputy 
Administrator of the FEO, said. 

In hearings before the 
Subcommittee on Foreign 
Commerce and Tourism, Dr. 
Sawhill said that by 
maintaining strict conservation 
measures ther^ should ^be 
enough gasoline for vacation 
travel. "The reduction bf 
hlghSr^y'^^^d^;^^ in<;feiised cfar 
pooUng and other actions have 
probably given us greater 
supplies of gasoline for the busy 
summer months," he said. 

Automobiles are often the 
only means for vacation travel. 
Dr. Sawhill said. 

AIRLINES CAN ABSORB 

only two to five per cent of 
automobile travel, because 
scheduled flights do not serve 
many outdoor recreation 
destinations. Other forms of 
mass transit lack facilities to 
replace a significant amount of 
automobile use, he said. 

Thus, a gasoline shortage for 
cars inevitably results in a 
reductio^of tourist trade, Dr. 
Sawhill said. 

Some recreational industries 
have been hit particularly hard. 

"The energy crunch is a 
national disaster for all the 
hotel and motel operators who 
had to operate on 10 per cent 
occupancy," Seiutor Daniel K. 
Inouye (D-Hawaii), chairman 
of the subcommittee, said in 



response to Dr. Sawhiir's 
testimony. This may not show 
up in national statistics, but it 
was a disaster for them, he said. 

RECREATION VEHICLES 

are also an important part of 
the tourism industry that have 
suffered under fuel restrictions. 
Dr. Sawhill said. 

States vary in their economic 
reliance on tourism. Some 
states, such as Florida, rely 
almost entirely on tourist trade. 

Other states, such as Nevada 
and Hawaii, derive over 15 per 
cent of their gross income from 
tourism. 

For some primarily industrial 
s^tes, such as Pennsylvania 
and New York, recreation is not 
the main source of revehOe. 
However, there are still lai|ge 
tourist operations that are 
affeffted by travel reductions 
due to fuel shortages. 

DR. SAWHILL cited a 
number of m^isures geared to 
help the tourist indi/stry and 
avoid curtailments in vacation 
travel. ' 

"The most important 
measure," Dr. Sawhill said, 
was "encouraging gas stations 
to reopen on Sunday." This 
relieved a great dedl of 
travelers' uncertainty about 
getting gasoline. 

Secondly, the FEO is 
equalizing the gasoline 
allocations between states. This 
also will lessen uncertainties 
about fuel availability. 

The FEO may establish j^ 
hotline information system So 
provide travellers with 
information on availability (rf 
gasoline in specific regions. 

Finally, if it becomes 
necessary, the FEO might 
provide special allocations to 
gas stations on interstate 
highways. Dr. Sawhill said. 



m 



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Featured 

Fly the friendly 
guys of the skies 



Page A-6-Th« Sun-WednMday, April 10, 1974 



Feminist charges that 
National Airhne's "Fly Me" 
campaign was designed to 
sell more than air space has 
produced a rash of wild 
rumors that should be put to 
rest. 

It is absolutely untrue that 
^ National is thinking of 
changing its name to 
Topless Airlines. Or that 
beaded curtains are being 
installed in the tails of their 
747's. Furthermore, the 
whispers that the airline is 
being investigated for 
possible violations of the 
Mann Act were started by a 
bunch of disgruntled 
stewardesses too plump to 
fit into hot pants. 

Actually, National's 
merchandising of stewar- 
desses is in the grand old 
tradition of airline ad- 
vertising, most of which 
reads like the copywriters 
trained with Xavier 
Hollander. Even the staid 
and proper British ad- 
vertised their flag carrier 
BOAG with full-page 
illustrations of Elizabethan 
serving wenches cavorting 
on revelers' laps. The ac- 
companying headline read 



"When we started training 
our cabin crews, the 
aeroplane wasn't invented." 

IHWKVER. it's little Air 
Jamaica's advertising that 
flies the highest. That line 
may not have Cheryl and 
her friends, but they MVe 
"rare tropical birds 
rej^esenting the best of five 
nationalities" modelling 
bikinis in mid-air fashion 
shows. The tired 
businessman may be 
disappointed if he doesn't 
encounter some tyrlHilence, 
since the airline promises a 
trip he'll never forget with a 
message borrowed from 
massage parlors "We make 
you feel good all over." 

Slightly subtler are pitch- 
es like United Airlines 
plea to "Take along a little 
inspiration" (the wife, of 
course) and the Lufthansa 
Red Baron's broad hint at 
red lights. 

Just about the only major 
airline to refrain completely 
from flesh peddling is 
Icelandic (think what they 
could do with "Warm up 
those freezing Artie 
nights"). Their business is 



booming even though all 
they advertise are the 
lowest trans-Atlantic fares 
of any scheduled carrier. 

GROUPS LIKE NOW 

(National Organization for 
Women) have protested 
sexist advertising cam- 
paigns, but the men in 
power have turned deaf ears 
to women. Personally, I 
think we should give men a 
taste of their own mer- 
chandising medicine, and to 
this end, propose the 
creation of FAIR (Female 
Advertising Image 
Reversal) Advertising 
Agency, to be dedicated to 
the proposition that turn- 
about is fair play. For 
example, FAIR could adapt 
the^"Fly Cheryl" TV spot to 

"Fly Chuck" in the 
following manner : 

"Hi, I'm Chuck" "...and 
I'm Steve"— pilot and co- 
pilot bounce from the cock- 
pit dressed in tailored hot 
pants. They chat with 
passengers as the an- 
nouncer invites viewers to 
"Fly our friendly guys." 

Naturally, a few 
troublemakers in the pilots' 




CEDAR WOOD 
HAMPTON'S 
PINEWOOD GARDENS 
GATEWOOD PARK 
LASKIN VILLAGE 
EASTWOOD VILLA 
BELLAMY MANOR 

LCr J GARDENS 
WOODHURST 

COUNTY VIEW 
TRAILER PARK 



NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
AND GIRLS 

MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
If you would llki to earn extra 
money and live in any of the 
areas listed below, call 
486-3430, Monday thru Friday 

THESE ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARE NEEDED 
GARDENWOOD PARK 
CARDINAL ESTATES 
59th STREET AREA 
WASHINGTON SQUARE 
ARROWHEAD 
HARBOR POINT 

WEBLIN PLACE 
CAROLANNE FARMS 

AVALON HILLS 
CHANTICLEAR APTS. 

LAKE EDWARD 
GREAT NECK MANOR 



CaM today and start aaming that axtra monay right nowl 
435.3430 Circulation 



After Sunset s^ 




luiion will protest that this 
adwrtising i^^ndignified 
and bears no resemblwce to 
a pilot's real job. But they 
will just have to understand 
that this image is necessary 
to , reassure anxious 
passengers. 

FAIR Advertising needn't 
limit itself to airline ac- 
counts. Cigars could be 
handled in the same manner 
Silva Thin cigafrettes once 
were (remember 
"Cigarettes are like 
women... the best are thin 
and rich") 

AS A MODEL resembling 
Aristotle Onassis is shown 
on TV screerts a female 
voice whispers: "Cigars 
are like men ... the 
best are well-aged, round 
and rich." 

And why not the march of 
the Olivetti boys'? Cor- 
porate executives could tell 
how their electric 
typewriters do their 



thinking for them. 

And why not sell 
detergents with a harried 
husband doing the wash as 
his wife and her friends play 
bridge? Or Joe the Plumber 
extolling the joys of kitchen 
cleansers to the guys in the 
corner bar? 

The fallout from such 
FAIR campaigns would be 
mind— bending. Outraged 
businessmen and 
congressmen would demand 
immediate legislation 
prohibiting the demeanii^ 
of human beings in in- 
terstate advertising. TV 
stations showing sexist 
commercials might even get 
their licenses revoked. At 
the very least, the media 
would be required to carry 
this message: 

'WARNING: THE 
SURGEON GENERAL HAS 
DETERMINED THAT 
ADVERTISING IS 
DANGEROUS TO YOUR 
MENTAL HEALTH." 



IIOROSCOPi, 



For 
AprK 10 

to 
AprK 16 

ARIES: (March Site April 
»— Ako Artel AsccMlant) — 
Yoa achieve great plwumre 
through friends and cani|Mn< 
ions. Go over "with a fine- 
toothed comb" to uncover er- 
rors, a project just atMut 
ready for presntation. Pro- 
ceed with cabnneis — csrb 
impulse. 

TAURUS: (April 21 to Mw 
a — Also Tnuw AieciMluf) 

- Don't be tanpatient wltti 
what seem to be delajn or 
blocks. You hive "behind the 
scenes" sun»ri Awent is on 
the Job area with sane 
changes in procedures Itte* 
Ijr. Find the time for hunuoil- 
tarian invdvements. 

CSStKBflx (Mqr 21 to Jane 
21 — iUso Gemlai AsendiBt) 

—Don't be in a hurry to make 
a decision regarding personal 
or professional matten. More 
facts will come later to aid in 
your choice. A change of out- 
look may be up-comlng — be 
open-minded and observant. 

CANCER: (Jane 21 to July 
22 — $3ao Cancer Ascendant) 

— Give attention to job and 
keep things going along 
harmoniously. Be willing to 
change procedures where 



more ^ident methods are 
avaiUble. Pay bills — keep a 
reserve for ponibie unec- 
pected expcraes. 

LEO: (My 2310 AHg. 22- 
Alio Ue Aseadast) — Prase 
and review your poi^: Ac- 
cent is on dMiqietitian and you 
must work hvd to nicceed. A 
phase is ending and your de- 
sire to diange your "Oylt" 
and personality meuis using 
dd talents and develoi^ 
new ones. 

VIRGO: (Augnst 22 to Sept 
22 — Also Virgo Ascendant) — 
iteep your mind on what 
you're doing to avoid mid- 
dents. S(Mne dumges in ttie 
work vea require emotional 
control. Some new romantic 
intvest is a possibility. Don't 
believe everyUiing ^u hear 
just now. 

LIBRA: (Sept 23 io Oct. 22 
— Also Ubra Ascendant) — 
Some sort of crisis in your 
partnership tut marriage 
could result In "hot" wwds. 
Curb temper or you could re- 
gret it. Friends test your pa- 
tience too, so control is 
needed. Work on old projects 
rather than starting new ones. 



SOmPIO: (Oct 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 
— Don't let a 'success" go to 
your bead — keep up your 
best effort. Accent is on the 
home area where okl items 
now valueless can be dis- 
carded and "cleaned otU." 



Sex 



99 



)eal featured 



at Hoogoven tourney 



Random thou^ts at an in- 
ternational chess tournament. 

The Russians: Soon afto- 
tiie Arab boycott d Holland, 
they announced that 'the busy 
schedules' ol their chessmas- ' 
ters would preclude their 
presence at Uie prestigious 
HoQgoven tournament, ^ich 
is to into-national chess what 
the Masters is to golf. 

But it takes more than lisle 
stockings tokiU a ^apely pair 
of legs, and so with Qie 
Hlogoven. Witii contributtens 
fr^ twenty4wo countries, it 
featured a conimotfity vriiidi 
doesn't grow on trees these 
days, especially in Moscow — 
sex appeal. 

Tlie Romanians: The most 
striking twosome was I.T. 
Ghitescu and his Garbo-esque 
wife. He has gleaming blade 
hair; a slender frame encased 
in a tight^tting black suit 
His wife wore a Ug flmqr 
cloth hat and a long, belted 
cloth coat set off by a pair of 
wide and striking eyes. Get- 
ting off the local bus, th^r 
mi^t have been Jdui Gilbert 
and Greta Garbo, 40 years 
ago, on the MGM set of a 
movie based (hi a Vidd Baum 
novel. 

The winner: 2S-y ear-old 
Walter Browne, of Berkeley, 
California, who shows up in 
more places than Henry Kis- 
singa". I asked him what 
makes a chess toimament 
something special. "Good 
prize money, good playing 
conditions, good pei^le." 




with Joseph Bro^M/n 






HIGH SPOTS 
AT NIGHT 
SPOTS IN 

TIDEWATER 



THE SHACK-4S known tiy the 
' ktcab 88 THE PLACE IN 
VIRGINIA BEACH. They 
feature sp^iais 4 nights a 
week: Monday night txgins the 
, week with the Winter Steak 
Special. Tuesday Night featwes 
Ski Flicks beginnii^ at 9, 
Thirsday Ni^t is LADIES 
NlGHT-^pecial 5 to 1. (Sorry. 
Ladies Only). Sunday Special 5 

for 1 fnnn 3 to 6. 

+++-H++ 



KfcsTAUR ANT— is iM-ovWeowetficnas D^mmi^ 
places emphasis on at 7. Be sure to stop by for fine 
Businessman's Luncheons, food, atmosphere, and| 
Luncheon parties, and d^nt efttolainment 
dimws for twft Entertaimnent k, +++-, 



19 



19 th Hole 

RESTAURANT 



Ef«y TuMdiy Ni^ s mci NIGHT At The SHACK 
- ftiairiwiSICI FLttia.'BtginiUmitSpjii. *> 



Ftn« Food. - CalMing - Privaie PartiM • Coclrt.ilt 

cl> SPEQAUZINQ IN: 

• BUSINESSMEN'S BREAKFASTS 

• LUNCHEONS 

• DINNER FOR TWO 

Breakfast __ Lunch 

7 am to 2 pm 1 1 «n to 2 pm 

Dinnw 

5 pm to 10 pm 

ENTERTAINMENT 

■Friday, Saturday, and Sumtoy at 7 (m 
Jdin Scott OT ttw Organ 

GOLF RANCH MOTEL 
1040 Lartcin Rd. Virslnla i«*, Va. 



"What makes a tournament 
bad?" "Lousy prize money, 
terrible playing conditions, 
bsdpebide." 

Argentina: There must be 
something in the air, there, 
which they ought to bottle for 
export. Browne's statjiesque 
wife is so beautiful, she majr 
get him elected president of 
Ai^entina when his playing 
days are over. ... The (dayer 
who drew most of the fans' at- 
tention was Migud Quinteros 
( ideirtified as 'Don Juan Quin- 
teros* at the prize-giving cere- 
mony). Ihe sight of his girt 
friends was alone worth the 
price of admission. 

(In the game bdow, Quhi- 
teros's offbeat reqxmse to an 
offbeat variation finds him . 
Utrashing about in Browne's 
mating net while still holding 
an advantage in material.) 

The victory banqnet: Every 
year a thousand chess|dayers 
and their families convejib at 
the huge glass-endos(|^ ban- ' 
qu^ hall of the Hoogoven Iron 
and Sted Works. The long ta- 
bles are bededted with the in- 
evitable Dutch flowOT and 
l^ted candles, and provide a 
free banquet of beer and ham 
and dieese, bread, fruit and 
coffee, and the sausage4aden 
erweton (pea) sotq) whteh is 
Holland's contribution to 
haute (and has) cuitine. 

Elsewhere abroad an 
American is a man with prd>- 
lons. (Ask a porter to grab 
your valise and he will first 
demand to know your opinion 
on Watergate.) But here only 
cheers greeted the amwunce- 

ACIOiS 

1. Cricket itick 
4. Knift 

t. Uai^rt't irord 
U. C17 Bt > bull 

Rfkt 
It Tki«v 
14. Glac* 
IB. By tteh mtmi 
it«iii:3wdi 

17. R«trlt»«, »•» 
fly tall: 

18. T»p»of«M«t 
It. Thin 
21. Bi<<rfflrt '' 
13. Inl«t 
U. GayoMiiif 
n. ConcMte: 

Zwdi. 



ment that Jim Tarjan, of 
Sherman Oaks, California, 

, won the title of International 
Master. (The loudest hurrah 

) was for a stunning blonde in a 
tight skirt and sweater, whose 
name everyone f oi^ot as they 
watdied her walk across Hw 
room to receive an award f^r 
winning. I think, the Reserve 
Women's ChamplonstUp.) 



Finally, the second place 
winner in the grandmaster di- 
vision. Holland's tall, plump 
and bearded Jan Hein Don- 
ner, who can make any con- 
versation on chess only a little 
less portoitous than the So-- 
mon on the Mount. 

Ho<%«veB Toomament 
-1174 

Walter Browne 

(USA) 

Miguel QnlBteres 
(Argerttaa) 

SICILIAN DEFia^SE 



1.P-K4 
2.N-KB3 
3.B-N5d) 
4.BxB 
5.P-B4 
6. 00 
7.P-Q4. 
8.R-K1 
9.NxP 
10.N-Ii3 
n.B-B4 
12.N(R3)-N5 
13.BxP 
14.RxPch 
15. R-^ 
16.N-B5 
IT.NxB 
18.R-K5di 



M. Antic 

SI. Grctk lMt«r 

St. Cradit buyinf 

•lta«rtyaato 

dothictmia. 
34. — Canyiin Dam. 

Ariiona 
36. Canm 
3«. Kvnldryd*- 

*ic« 
ST. Ripaniiofi 

40. SImdvr 

41. Gtm 

41 Kaplwswdly: 

46. Lily 

47. Iiilclasi^ 

48. Hr.Gcnhwfn 
48. aoo* — 

M. Run eaaily 
SL Sptek 



P-QB4 
P-Q3 

Q^ 
0^5 

QxKP 
PxP 
Q-B3 

QzBP 
Q-Bl 

<M2 
P-K4 
PxB 
B-K2 
Q-Bl 
K-Bl 
KzN 
Resigns 

• OWN 

1. ThiMt wrap ' 
1 — h»il!.'«n- 
ri»nt KTttXi^ 

3. Fmnnuii BiMtiin 
rvmt: gwdn. 

4. VontriMi* fi»h 

5. txUnbul na- 
civ* 

a. GtaMMnwiiw, 
for on* • 

7. Paaatd by: 2 



p- r- r»r r- r tTbt- r- IT IT 


a IT' ■ V> 


pp^::ii?--„ 


u HUl !•• " *■ 




I 1 jfl 


''' ._i! !! 




B H4I "TB*^ 





8«. 

n. 

88. 

so. 



G^ in touch with your sense 
of humor. ' ' 

SAGirrARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 - Also Sagitlariw As- 
cendant) - Use your courage 
and pertonality to work wiOi 
some organizatioa needing 
your strength and fire. Don't 
be influenced unduly by 
others in matters relating to 
love or friends. Curb inde- 
pendence. 

CAPRICCmN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jta. 19 — Aim Capricora As- 
cenduit) — Some sort of 
home eqiupment may need 
replacing now. Be careful 
working around electrical 
equipment. Curb overly- 
forceful attitudes in cweer. 
Use round-aboirt methods to 
solve difficulty. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 21 t* 
Feb. U - Also Aquariw As- 
cendant) — Some element ct 
"luck" is apparent now. It 
cmdd be more freed(Hn from 
responsiUlity or uneqiected 
income. W(»-k steadily, pa- 
tienUy and "keep your cool." 
Home omditions could pre- 
sent problems. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
» — Also Pisces Ascendant) 
— Take care of old debts and 
don't contract new ones Just 
now. Unexpected expenses in- 
volving your residence are 
possible. Social life may be- 
come more active. Seek 
agreement wiUi family on fu- 
ture budget. 



8. Panily 

8. Tknk 
10. DmA 
n. shMt- 

18. Stapptf 
20. Affm 
tl. C«tain Uovr 
IS. Lai««rod«M 
88. Contcnda 
88. Plact for adds 

ami«n^ 

Mtfiliflcmt 

Fufpeaaa 

Twantpa 

Wagan 

33. CoiuiaahMr 

34. JaMlant loek 
38. aabnw 

37. S^tt 

38. Gridrni — 
(UdM8:81) 

'aaiMc 



Strhtfy 
persortal 

Visiting children 
need some rules 

By PAT and 
MARILYN DAVIS 

Dear Pat and MarUyn: 

I have a daughter who has two beauUftil children. 
The boy is 7 and the little girl is 4. The girl has the 
face (rf an angel and the boy is absolutely hand- 
some. The compliifents can end right there. 

When these two youngsters come for a visit, our 
house lodis like a cyclone hit it. They are in every 
closet and drawer in the house. They go outside and 
play in the dirt and thai wipe their hands on. the 
wallpaper and woodwork. If they do go to the 
bathroom to wash, the sink lo<^ like they made 
mud pies va, it and the towels are black. It takes a 
week to locate everything after they leave. 

How can I tactfully tell my daughter to have a few 
rules and regulations and to enforce them? She has 
absolutely no discipline or controf. 

Grandpa 

Dear Grandpa: 

The next time this wrecking crew arrives, tell 
your dat^ter exactly how you feel. 

Dear Pat and MarUyn: 

I am SH> and have been woiidng for one year. I like 
my job and have a nice apartment which I share 
with another girl. My problem is Kurt. He is 22, 
handsome, and has a great personality. But he also 
stretches the truth, has lost two i<*8 in one year, 
and is totally unrellaUe as far as I am concerned. 
Despite his faults, I like the guy. Do you think I 
should drop him? 

Sally 

Dear Sally: 

Kurt would hardly win the title of "Mr. Depen- 
dability of 1974." All he has to offer is problems. 
Unless that's what you want, get a new boyfriend. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

' What can a teen-ager do about a snoopy mother? 
My mother lodks in my purse, chedcs the dresier 
drawers and always manages to be around when 
I'm on the tel^one. I don't intend to do anything 
wrong but I can't stand these a|^ tactics any 
longer. How (k> 1 1^ her how I feel? She's really 
^^t other-wise. 



Leah 

the papef^#4)and her this 
wrong. Stop playing detec- 
a parant's reiponsibQity to 
but go about it in the right 
dat^ter thlnts you are 
displaying your trust and 



4S. OvMiy 

44, O^: ^BMak 

4ft. She(-»9(r 



SoH^ftm on papi B~6 



Ovax L«ih: 

Let h«- read it in 
column. Mom, you're 
tive. I agree that it is 
know what is going on 
way. Obviously, your 
great. RecifHtKate by 
confideiM:e in to*. 

Dear Pat and Muilyn: 

I feu in love with a young marfwe'^ call Joe. We 
dated for abcmt six months and findly broke up. Joe 
wait into the Coast Guard. When he came hone m 
inve, 1m aded me to marry him. I told Urn that we 
waw't dther m» n»# Us nich a s^ious it^. 

Joe again ^bSpp^ seeing me and within a mmth 
was enp9^ to at»tb«- gfarl. Now, two m<mths. 
later, hte ^ter tidls ram ttiat Joe hM brokoi the 
Mgag^Mort and wants to date me. I ttiU like Mm 
very mudi. What sboiUd I do? I don't want to be 

hurt a^dn. 

19 and C^itascd 

Dear Cenfaied: 

I tt^dc Joe is inloi^ with low. Itete Mm. if vou 
must, but don't make aiqF hng;ran^ plans with one 

•ofidde. 

imr. rm miMmtyit Dolt, 1*^* *«* am. i»««-- 
mmaHmi. lt|Mf Jte*. Kt 23453. 



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ports 



JYm Sun-W«dn«dty, April 10. t974-i»ap A-7 



PREVIEW 



Track action today highlights weeic 



1 



By JOHN BANNON 
Sports Editor 

.Track beat the weatter last wedc as local squads 
got in a full schedule. The same could not be said for 
golf and tennis. Two golf matches and four tennis 
confrontations fell victim to the inclement April 
weatttor. 

This week local teams will not only be battling 
each' other and the weather, but also the Norfolk 
schbols spring vacation break, which will affect the 
golf and tennis schedules. 

Track 

Local harriers had a busy schedule last week 
witH all six local teams in action. Four city teams 
posted victdiries. This week only five Beach schools 
w iir be running as Princess Anne has a bye in the 

schedule 

On tfip this week is First Colonial hosting 
Kempsville; Bavside traveling to Norview; Kellam 
hosting Granby ; and Cox is at Lake Taylor. All the 
dual meets will begin at three this afternoon. Later 
in the week, First Colonial and Cox will try for the 
third time to get their. dual meet underway. Raiin 
forc?fl cancellation on two previais occassions. 
. fhe K?mpsville-First Colonial match-up could 
be the closest of the afternoon's action. Both local 
squads are coming off big wins last week. First 
Colonial blasted Granby 99-32, wbile Kempsville 
manharidled Booker T. Washington 10^-25. 

Pirtriots Bert Lewis and Ernest Davis were the 
stars^iri the big First Colonial win. Lewis scored 18 
points for his team, while placing first in three 
events. The 6'4" senior won the long jump, triple 
jump and the 100-yard dash. Lewis tied the Patriot 
school record in the 100 with a time 9.9 seconds. 
Davis was equally impressive, taking top honors in 
the ^t put and the discus. The muscular Patriot 
br^e the existing school record in the shot last 
w^k. 

Kempsville was equally impressive in their 
outdoor debut. Junior Mike Crabtree led the way 
with wins in the high jump and the 100-yard dash. 



CrabU^e set a new school record in the high jump. 
The Chiefs long distance team of Steve Sawyra- and 
Matt Stavish dominated the Bodcers in ttie kH^r 
events. . 

First Colonial showed great strength in the field 
events in Uie opener. Kempsville is prt^bly 
stronger in the longer races. The meet promises to 
be a close one. 

Bayside improved their record to 2-0 wflh a 
convincing win against Lake Taylor last wedc. The 
Marlins seem to be the team to beat in the Eastern 
District. Their opponent Norview has made only 
one appearance on the outdoor circuit so far this 
season. The Pilots outcUstanced Lake Taylor to 
open their season last week. 

The Marlins will once again be led by their 
talented trio of Roscoe Coles, Eric Cha{Hnan and 
freshman Jerry Mosely. The three harriers have 
spearheaded Bayside's efforts in the q>ening two 
dual meets, accounting for 13 individual wins. The 
competition between freshman Mosely and senior 
Coles has been one of the highlights of the outdoor 
seasoh thus far. Mosely tied the school 100-yard 
dash record in the Marlins opening meet to edge 
Coles. Last week Coles came back to lower the 
school record to 9.7 seconds an<J nudge Mosely at 
the wire by a tenth of a second. 

Kellam and Granby meet with each team 
holding a 1-1 mark. The Knights have been the far 
more impressive team, clobbering Cox and 
narrowly losing to Bayside. Granby CMitclassed a 
weak Booker T. Washington team to start their 
season, but last week was routed by First Colonial. 

Ken Rutledge is undefeated this season in the 

shot put and the discus. The Knights overall 

strength in the field events should provide enough 

^breathing room for Kellam to coast to an easy win. 

Cox will be travelling to Lake Taylor in search of 
their first dual meet win. The Falcons are 0-1 on 
the year, while the Titans have gotten off to a 
stumbling 0-2 start. 

One of the Falcons few bright spots in their 
opener against Kellam was the long distance 
running of Brian Rhinehart. The steady senior 
placed first in both the 880 and the mile. 



The Falcons will have to contend with Lake 
Taylor's stret^th in the field events in the person of 
Tommy Graves. The multi-talented senior was a 
triple winner in the Titans meet with Bayside last 
weidi. 

Qotf 

The Norfolk schools vacation break has caused a 
break in the Eastern District golfschedule. There 
will be no league matches this wed( as play will 
resume on April 18. 

The biggest surprise of the high school spring 
%ason was registered last week on the golf course. 
First Colonial and Kemi^ville both finished ahead 
of two-time defending state champion Princess 
Anne. The Cavaliers finished eight strokes behind 
the first place Patriots, posting a team total of 311 
on the Red Wing course. The Cavaliers will be 
seeing to rebound from the stunning upset with 
two non-league matches this week. Monday, 
Princess Anne travels to Lake Wright golf course to 
play Norfolk Collegiate, white Tuesday the 
Cavaliers play at Suffolk. 

Tennis 

The tennis season has been hampered by poor 
weather and will now also suffer from the break in 
the schedule due to Norfolk school's vacation. 

The break does give the locals a chance to make- 
up 'some of the rained out dates. Cox is at home 
today against Norfolk Catholic and travels to Lake 
Taylor on Tuesday. Princess Anne will host Kellam 
Thursday in their second attempt to play that 
match. Kempsville travels to Craddock this af- 
ternoon, and will also try to make up a rain date 
with Lake Taylor later in the week. Bayside will be 
idle this week. 

^fbe regular Eastern District schedule will 
resume on April 17. Kempsville and Princess Anne 
have been the two hottest local teams. The Chiefs 
are 4-1 overall and 2-1 in the district, while the 
Cavaliers have logged a 4-0 overall mark and a 2-0 
re<K>rd in league play. 



HARRISON WINS AGAIN 



Chiefma^^ine downs 6th opponent 

BvSdHSJ wlNNON Lowry started <^ Ws half rf _ . - " - - 



BylOHNi^NNON 
Sports Editor 

^ Neither rain nor First 
Colonial could keep Kempsville 
from its appointed round with 
victm^. The undefeated Chiefs 
won their sixth straight with a 3- 
triumph at home Thursday. 

.r Kempsville used the two^hit 
pitching of Bob Harrison and a 
three-run fourth inning to stop 
the Patriots. Fi^t CoMmial 
tasted defeat for (he first time 
this spring. Coach Ted Phelp's 
Patriots now own a 2-1 record. 
First Colonial seniw Scott 
Lowry dueled evenly with Chief 
Harrison through the first three 
innings. Kempsville Uireatened 
to score agfiinst Lowry in the 
bottom of the second. The 
Chiefs loaded the bases with 
only one aWay on two bases on 
balls and a line single to right by 
Mike Crabtree. 



IX)WRY ESCAPED from the 
jam unscathed posting a 
strikeout, and forcing 
Kempsvilie Irft fielder Jimmy 
Moore to pop to the shtrtstop. 

First Colonial could do little 
with Harrison's southpaw 
offerings in the early innings. 
Lowry managed the first hit off 
the Chief ^tcher with a two-cut 
second inning single. 
Kempsville catcher Jerry Crain 
disposed of the Patriot 
baserunner, nailing Lowry 
stealing to end the second. 
Harrison faced only the 
regulation idne men, during the 
first three innings. 

Harrison was even stronger in 
Uie fourth inning, retiring the 
si<te an ^rikes. He got Patrirts 
Drany Ogle and Mike Bowman 
swinging and caught First 
Colonial lefttielder Carl 
McDonald looking at a thiiti 
strike. In winning his second 
decision of the c#ftpaign, 
Harrison set down 10 Patrirts 
on strikes. 



-Lowry starts aSi tus half dl 
the fourth frame shakily, 
walking catcher Grain. The rain 
came after Crabtree had 
worked the count to 1-0, giving 
Lowryaffi-rtriflUte-reprieve. 



./VFTRR TflE SKIES had 

cleared enough for play to 
resume, Lowry clunked 
Crabtree m the side of his head 
.with one of his offerings. The 
Patriot righthander continued 
to dig himself a deeper hole, 
advancing Crain and Crabtree 
up a base with a wild pitch. 



Chirf third baseman pave 
Waick, who was pressed into 
service due to f hamsbnng 
injury to regular third Iraseman 
Steve Hanson, broke ttie sewing 
ice. Walck drove home the only 
run Harrison would need, 
dropping a bloop single at 
Patriot centerfielder Ogle's 
feet, counting Crain. Crabh-ee 
was unable to advance* from his 
second base post on the shwt 
single. 

A baseranning error almost 
bailed the Patriots out of the 
inning without any further 
damage. Crabtree made too 
deep a turn around third, 
following a bunt single and was 
tagged Mit « 

Leaded hitter Mowe kq?t the 

, pressure «i as his deep drive 

' found the gap in left-center for a 

double and an RBI. A sacrifice 

fly to center brought hcmie 

Kempsville's third run, but 

MoM-e became thf second Chief 

runner to be caught wi the 

basepaths, being rundown 

^i^ween third and home after 

an aborted attempt to scwe 

from second on the fly to center. 



THE THREE-RUN outburst 




KEMPSVILLE OUTFIELDER Mike Crabtree 
rounds third base (left), during fourth inning 
action against First Colonial. The swift Chief 



took too wide a turn (right) on teammate's 
hunt single and was tagged out^hy Pataiot 
third baseman. (Sun phtftosby Neal Sims) 



was all the strong throwing 
Harrison needed. In the fifth, 
the junior righthander ran his 
strikeout string to five in a row, 
Darrel Doss went down 
swinging, while Harrison 
cai^ht Patriot catcher Chris 
Swecker kxiking at a third 
strike. 

The rain delay did not affect 
Harrison In the adverse way it 
had his opponent. The Patriots 
only managed a harmless one- 
out sii^le in the sixth after idax^. 
resumed, 

Harrison was overpowering 
in his second start of the spring. 
He fac^^iiply me letter over 



regulation, during his Mven- 
inning stint Betwerai the third 
and tte sixth, he retired 10 
sb-aight First Colonial hitters. 
Harrison gave-up only two other 
balls to the outfield, besides tte 
two singles. 

For his efforts, Lowry 
deserved a better fate. The 
senior rightliander went the fUU 
cSstance, yielding only fh^e hits. 
With the exception of the secoid 
inning threat and the crucial 
fourth inning la|ee, Lowry was 
in command oi the Ciiiefs. 
kempsville failed to g^ a 
nomer past first in any other 
inning. Control was Lowry's 
downfall as he walked fWe 
Kempsville hitters. 



Pitching cmitinues to propel 
the Chiefs, durtaig thdr eariy 
season spurt. The starting 
pitcher has been'around at the 



:S?SS» 




finish In five of the Chl^s first 
six contest. Harrison and 
teammate Moore botti have two 
complete games to their cre<Ut. 



Athlete oS. 



the Week 



"^^ 



Scott 
O'Hara 



Krnnpa^Ue 



^ 



FI^T COLONIAL pltdier Swft homy 
delivers |rft<A Thwr^ay at ReMptvflle. Tlw 
Patri^ s«rr«^ tMr Hrrt MaiA tf ttw 



M«iM as tlw Chi^ rantlMMd t« r^ wItt a M 
win. (Son ^ot» bjr Nail Wua) 



Kempsvilte pitcber Scott O'llara tes been 
selected as Virgin^ Beach Ugh schod athtete 
of the week due to Ms pitching performance in 
the (MOi 4-2 win against Kdlam last week. 
^ If^ so|rfiomere, makii^ his finrt var^ty 
iqppearance oime cm in reltef in the ft*st 
•inri^wittithel^M^ toacte iandoii^oneout. 
OH^ iffitied out oTffie pti without givi^ 
up a nn and procee^d to shut the Knights oiA 

the rest or the way <m three hiU. 

An outstanitt!^ a^te wiU be chosen 
wed^ by The Sun tivtN^hoiA ttK qring M^ 

sciiotrt s^smi. 




SMUNES 

By 

Jafkn 
BaiMon 

Sports Idtor 



Quit raining on 
the sports page 

Virginia Beach — the world's largest resort city 
— what a joke. 

Over the past three weeks, Virginia Beach has 
resembled the world's largest duck refuge more 
than a pleasant resort city. 

When basketball and wrestling had made their 
farewell appearances for 1974, the reporter was left 
with very little to write about. 

' AFTER SPENDING a few fitful weeks scraping 
for copy, the reporter was overjoyed with the 
quickly approaching spring sports season. 

No longer would there be the constant battle just 
to fill (he sports pages with printed words. A wealth 
of stories would exist. Beach high school athletes 
compete in four different spring sports. By simple 
arithmetic that adds up to 24 teams to cover, and a 
sports page just bulging with information. Ah! ' My 
cup runneth over. 

Battle plans were already being formulated for 
the fight with the editor for more space. The Beach 
actually boasted of two defending state champions 
with Kempsville in baseball and Princess Anne in 
golf, 

STARTINfi THK SPRING season off, the 
reporter left room in the sports pages for three 
baseball games, breaking past the normal sports 
deadline. To sum up that move simply — it was a 
huge blunder. With this huge hole in the sports page 
staring him in the face, the reporter awoke on 
deadline day to findwhite stuff, falling from the sky. 
After a brief check at the surroundings determined 
his bed had not been moved to New England 
overnight, he came to the only logical conclusion — 
it was snowing in Virginia Beach in March. 

By the way, it is net a common practice to play 
baseball games ifi the snow, but it is a common 
practice of editors to « frown at blank spots in a 
newspaper where words are the usual tennants. 

From that foreboding begining, things have 
deteriorated to the ridiculous. Kempsville may 
have won their first six l>aseball games, but the 
weather has beien the almost uncontested power of 
the spring season. 13 baseball games, three track 
meets, six tennis matches and four golf matches 
have been felled bv Mother Nature's knockout 
punch. The ill-fated First Colonial - Cox track 
meet has been postponed hot once but twice due to 
inclement weather. 

The Princess Anne baseball team is proving to be 
better weather forecastqrs than Rhonda Glenn- 
There is no surer way to bring rain in Virginia 
Beach than have the Cavaliers schedule a baseball 
game. The high schodiasaseball season is entering 
its fourth week, and the Cavaliers have played a 
grand total of one game. It is the purpose of The Sun 
sports pages to give equal coverage to all six city 
high schools, but the different ways to say Princess 
Anne was rained out have just about been 
exhausted. 

DESPITE ALL these misfortunes, the breaking 
point was not reached until last week. Thursday 
started off well enough with the sun shining most <tf 
the day. Bouyed by the improvement in the weather 
and thethought that all losing streaks come to an 
end sometime, the reporter conned his editor into 
taking the paper's new camera out to phtHc^aph 
the Kempsville-First Colonial baseball game. 

As game time drew near, things began to 
change. The sun disappeared and dark clouds 
began to hover over the playing field. SUll the game 
started without rain accompaning it. Mother 
Nature corrected this oversight in the bottom of the 
fourth inning, halting process with a cloud burst. 

There stood my editor, with 50 other people. 
trying to get shelter under a two-foot roof. As the 
rain came down on the brand new camera, could 
anyone blame him for thinking about replacing the 
sports editor. 

There stood the reporter with his score sheet 
now just a soggy piece of paper with the ink running 
all together. 

BELIEVE IT or not, the Oiiefs and the Patrtoto 
actually played a full seven innings. So what ttiat 
your boss was standing there soaking wet. So what 
that the last wt was recorded in something that 
resembled a hurricane. Kempsville and First 
Colonial lad defeated the od<te and played a 
b|pet»il game. 

Fey those interested, the final score was (hidts 4, 
Kempsville 3, fish 2 and First Colwiial 0. ^ 
«* Fhially, there is this recurring, nlghtinare of an 
editor sitting, "Raindrops keep falling on my 
head... 



N. CaroKna signs 
Falcon Gaudreau 



«► 



Cox's Jim Gaudreau has 
become the second Beach 
winter smarts athlete to receive 
an atWetic grant-in-aid from a 
cdlege. The Falcrai's star 185- 
pound wresOer si^ied a grant- 
in-aid with North Carolina 
University <» Sunday. 
Gandreau ynns Ba^de's Elton 
Gran as the bro local athletes 
to receive grants th^ year. 

Gaudreau had a brilliant 
career as a member of the 
three-time state champion 
Falcons. Hm car^ bi^i sdioel 
recor* wm a MerMog 604*1. 
Gmidresa's only loss in the iMt 
two yi^ came in fata kot 
mabAu a ^rt^od wnMkr. 
Clothtg in on his second 
consecutive state iSS-pouMl 
title, Gaudreau suffered a 
serioMMrioMteB«( hirribaw 
m ttw Mte Me bout aari wm 
f ar(^ t« MfffMte hte me. 

D^pite the UQe 

mu^ptUOau^ dawfreaa h^ 



an excellent year for the 
Falcons. His team was onb' 
tested twke all season In dual 
matches and both times 
Gaudreau played the "Ifr. 
Clutch" role. The senior 
delivered match-clinching 
victories against Kemi^vlBe 
and Norview. 

Gaudreau won numerous, 
honors, dia-ing ha sUy at Cok. 
In his sq>homore yrar, 
Gaudreau finnhed Mcond tai te 
Extern Regional toumaawA. 
In ^nett two years, Gadtavw 
was ^t aboiA uusi ^ pp ahia, 
takii^ two Falcon Invitational 
titles, two Eastern Districti 
tetmameM tides, two Easter^ 
Ri^Mial toumameirt titks mi 
the one state ehampho^. 
The Falcon wi^tliaf 

ia» Gao^Mu Md two4iBt 
stete diaBflM iNM^MsUMl 
Newbea. Oe Job iiii nlna hr 
teM kf t trttod to eoif7 oa. 



> » 



■ll^ww 






mmmmm 



^■H 



mmmmmm 



wmm 



m 



nqie A-tf-ineaun-WedHMday, Apni lU, i»(4 



Kellam harriers outrun Falcons^ 95-36 

Bayside wins also; 
Coles sets school 
lOO-yd. dash mark 



KellamASCoxse 

Kellam rebounded strongly 
from their season opening loss 
to Bayside. The Knights 
outclassed city rival Cox on 
April 3 at Kellam. The Knights 
coasted to a 95-36 
dual meet win. 

This year's indoor track 
champions received a balanced 
team effort to notch their first 
win of the outdoor season. The 
Falcons, making their debut of 
the outdoor season, have an 0-1 
record. 

For the second straight week, 
the Knights dominated the field 
events. The F'alcons failed to 
register one first place in any of 
the five field ' events. The 
Knights sweep in the field 
events was led by Ken 
Rutledge, who took top honors 
in both the shot and the discus. 
Rutledge has yet to lone in 
either of his specialties this 
season. 

Stierling Johnson and Jeff 
Henry were the other dual 
winners for the Knights. 
Johnson delivered a first ;p tiie 
long jump with a leap of .J'8". 
Johnson also came home ahead 
of the pack in the 440 with a time 
of 51.9 seconds. Henry placed 
first in the triple jump and the 
high hurdles. His first place 
triple jump was 40*9", while he 
posted a meet best in the high 
hurdles of 16.9 seconds. 

The Falcons excellent long 
distance runner Brian 
Rhinehart was one of the few 
bright spots, during Cox's long 
afternoon. The senior led the 

fleld in boUi the 880 and the 
mile. Rhinehart's mile time was 
four minutes 43.9 seconds. 

Cox's other dual winner was 
Dave Cannon. The junior was 
the best sprinter in the meet, 
taking first place honors in both 
the 100-yard dash and the 220. 
Cannon covered the 100 yards in 
10.3 seconds and posted a time 
of 23.0 in the 220. 



Rayslde 88 Lake Taylor 43 
Bayside continued to show 
early season strength, 
travelling to Lake Taylor and 
defeating the Titans 88-43. 
Bayside's powerful trio of 
Roscoe Coles, Jerry Mosely and 
Eric Chapman continued to lead 
the way. 

■ Coles had a great afternoon 
with four individual victories. 
The swift senior avenged his 
earlier loss to freshman Mosely 



BOAT 

OWNER 

READ 

THIS! 




WE HAVE A NEW POLICY DE- 
8iCNEJ> FOR IHE OWNERS 
W OUTBOARDS, INBOARDS, 
SAILM>ATS AND INBOARD/ 
OUTBOARM, 25 FEET OR 
UNDER.COVERAGEINCLUDES 

YOUR BOAT, MOTOR, EQUIP- 
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your liabiuty to oihers 
iuusing from ihe use of 
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_ FAVl^NTS 

UMOmiS (DERATION 

WRESTRiCTED TERRITORIAL 
UMITS. 

KEMlUMfi DCUPDE COVER- 
MSE TOR FHYSiaiL DAM- 
AGE $100,000. WATEftCRAFT 
LIABILITY AND $1,000 MBXH- 
OUL PAYMENTS. 



CHECK 
WITH US 
FOR COST 

COMPARISON 







4as-7m 



with a school-record time of 9.7 
seconds in the 100-yard dash. 
Promising freshman Mosely 
turned in his second sub-10 
second 100 with a time of 9.8 
seconds to finish a close sec(Hid 
to teammate Coles. 

Coles took the loi% jump with 
a best leap of 22'5" and top 
honors in the triple jump, 
posting a meet best of 40'0". 
Coles also lowered his 440 time 
by a full second, placing first 
with, a time of 49.6 seconds. 

Freshman Mosely won his 
second straight 220 test of the 
outdoor season with a 23.0 
second performance. The tfme 
was three-tenths of second 
quicker than his meef winning 
time two weeks ago against 
Kellam. Chapmancontinued to 
lead the Marlin long disfance 
entries, posting victories in the 
.880 and mile for his second 
straight two-win meet of the 
season. Chapman turned in the 
best 880 performance of the 
young season by a city runner 
with a two minute clocking. The 
senior Marlin failed to equal his 
best mile time of the season, 
slipping to 4:43.8. „. 

Kempsvllle 106 
R.T.Washington 25 

Kempsville opened their 
outdoor track season on a 
winning note, blasting Booker 
T. Washington 106-25. It was the 
largest point total ammassed by 
any city team thus far this 
season. 

Mike Crabtree was one of the 
Chief's biggest stars of the 
afternoon. pacing the 
Kempsville effort with two 
victories. One of the best all- 
around athletes in the city, 
Crabtree broke the KempsviUe 
school record in the high jump 
with a leap of 6'3". Crabtree 
followed his record setting 
effort with a victory in the 100- 
yard dash with a time of 10.5 
seconds. 

Steve Sawyer was another 
djal winner fm* the Chiefs, 
taking the 880 and the mile. 
Sawyer turned in an excellent 
880 time ot 2:05. KempsviUe 
cross-country star Matt Slavish 
completed the Chief's 
domination of the long distance 
(vents with a triumph in the 
two-mile run. 

^^ ^rst Colonial M 

Granby 32 

First Colonial started their 
Eastern District outdoor track 
season off on the right foot with 
a convincing victory over 
previously undefeated Granby. 

The Patriots were keyed by a 
pair of record breaking 
performances by Bert Lewis 
and Ernest Davis. Lewis tied 
the existing school mark in the 
100-yard dash with a time of 9.9 
seconds. Davis shattered the 
school shot-put record with a 
heave of 51'11". 

Lewis scored 18 team points 
for. the Patriots in a brilliant 
individual performance. The 
Patriot senior, who starred this 
winter on the First Colwiial 
basketball team, took top 
honors in the long jump and the 
triple jump to go along with his 
record tying 100-yard 
performance. 

Davis coupled his record 
heave in the shot put 
competition with a victory io 
the discus. Davis took top 
honors, Growing the discus 
139'2", which is a city best so far 
this season. Behind the 
strength of Davis and Lewis, the 
Patriots rolled to an 
insurmountable lead, sweeping 
all the field events jigainst the 
Comets. 

Maury 68 
Princess Anne 63 

Princess Anne's outdoor 
debut was spoiled by the 
individual brilliance ol Maury's 
Karltoiv ' Hilton. The 




KRLLAM HURDLER Jeff Henry clears the 
no\t to last hurdle on his way to a high hurdle 
victory in dual meet action against Cox last 



week at Kellam. The Knights rebounded from 
:m earlier loss to Bayside with a convincfaig 
nerforraance. (Sun photo by John Bannon) 



Commodores all-state 
basketball star dominated the 
field. Hilton won five different 
events and topped off his day's 
work running the anchor leg on 
the winning Maury mile-relay 



team. 

Despite Hilton's individual 
dramatics, the Cavaliers still 
manage^ to keep the dual meet 
close. Princess Anne senior 
Mike Casey gave the Cavaliers 



a first place finish in the high 
jump, clearing 5*8". Snyder was 
the other Cavalier field event 
winner with a first in the pole 
vault competition. 
Frend was Princess Anne's 



(Hily double winner finishing on 
top in the high hurdiefr and the 
intermediate hurdles. Robbie 
Edwards was the Cavaliers 
other winner, taking the 440 
with a time of 50.8 seconds. 




O'Hara strfies 
Knights in reiief 



FMay 



Rain cancelled the day's 
baseball schedule as First 
Colonial at Bayside; and Cox at 
Princess Anne were postponed. 



Thursday 



Kellam's game with Eastern 
Acsdemy was postponed due to 
rain. Tuesday the Knights were 
at Cox. 



Knights with a double-piay oau. 
The sophomore hurler kept the 
door closed, pitching six and 
two-third innings of scoreless 
relief to gain the victory. 
Kellam managed just three 
base hits against O'Hara's 
offerings. 

The Chiefs pecked away at 
the Kellam lead, picking up 
single tallies against Kellam 
starter Rick Bloxom in the third 
and fourth innings. Chief 
shortstop Alan Price delivered 
the game-winning blow with a 
two-run double in the bottom ct 
the fifth. 




VIRGINIA 
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ENGRAVING 
TROPHY CO. 

Tropiyes. ^iqms. Awnds 

Machine Engrtving 

Ctaig A. MontgoiBCTy, 

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DEFENDING INDIVIDUAL state champion 
Richard Tucker rolls in a putt on the 16tii 
^reen last Thursday. The putt was not enough 
fo save Princess Anne from suffering their 
first defeat in three seasons. City rivals First 
Colonial and Kempsville finished ahead of the 
defending state champs in a triangular match. 
fSun photo by Rod Mann) 

Cavalier golf 
mastery ended 

It has been a bad month for 
dynasties. UCLA lost an NCAA 
tournament game. The NFL 
champion Miami Dolphins lost 
three first line ballplayers to the 
WFL. Now two-time deeding 
state golf champion Princess 
Anne has lost a goiysatch. City 
rivals First cSutikl, aa^ 
Kempsville both finished ahead 
of the Cavaliers in a trian^lar 
match Thursday at Red Wing 
gold c<Nirse. 

Hie loss snapped the longest 
winning streak of any high 
school athletic team in the 
Beach. The CavaBers had won 
77 straight matches over a three 




seasoOkj^Iixl. Included in the 
win stl-eak, were four wii» to 
open this season. 

The opening match of the 
Eastern District season saw the 
Cavaliers sky to their highest 
team total (A the season with a 
team sccre of 311. Thie Chiefs 
finished five str<Aes ah^d of 
the d^ending state champiwis 
to take secmd |dace ' in the 
match with a team total of 306. 
Kem|»vil]e was a Qiird |dace 
finisher in the state competition 
a y^r ago. First Cotoiial's 
team covered the par-72 course 
with a team total of 303 to 
nantmly edge- the Chi^s. 

Kempsville's Roger Sava^ 
pmted the match's lowest 
scffl-e, touring the cour» witii a 
five under-par S7. 



Aprils 



Bayside 5 Lake Taylor I 

It took Bayside nearly three 
we^s to register that elusive 
first win of the tiiaseball season, 
bultheMarlins finally found the 
right combination defeating 
Lake Taylor 5-1 on the road. 

^Baysi(te senior righthander 
Marty Moore has'Seen involved 
in every Bayside decision so far 
this season. The senior hurler 
turned in his most imjressive 
performance of the campaign, 
limiting the Titans to just four 
hits. tAossK lost his shutout in 
the final inning. Moore had been 
the victim of spotty Marlin 
d^ense in his initial two 
outings, but Bayside badted^ 
him up this time with errorless^ 
ball. 

The Marlin offense finally got 
things gdng, pouitding Lake 
Taylor pitching for seven hits. 
The Marias jumped on t(^ 
early with tingle tallies in four 
of the first five innings. The five, 
runs and seven hits were both 
seasonal highs for the 1-2 
Marlins. 

Kempsville 4 Kellam 2 

Two-time defending state 
champion Kempsville found 
tliwi^lves trailing lor only the 
secomi time this » season as 
Kellam jumped on Chief starter 
Frank Welch for two runs in the 
t(9 (rf the first innii^. 

Relief pitcher Scott O'Hara, 
making his first varsity 
appearance for the Chiefs, 
came on in tte first with the 
bases hxided and one away. One 
{Htch and O'Hara lad slammed 
die door on the ^iset minded 



AprH2 



l Bi»B»8a» »»8«»atir » ai»»B»»B <tiii><imiT ti»>W ^ 

MONEY 

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Calls 625-3604 

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First Colonial 3 
Princess Anne 2 

The Cavaliers finally got to 
open their 1974 baseball seasm, 
but a late rally fell shwt 
spoiling their debut. First 
Colonial held on tar a 3-2 win 
over the Cavaliers at Princess 
Anne. 

Soi^omore Carl McDmiald 
had held Princess Anne 
sccnreless 'over the first six 
innings, but faltered in the final 
inning. The Cavaliers touched 
the Patriot hurler for two runs 
in the top of tte seventh. Senior 
Scott Lowry came on to get the 
final out to preserve 
McDonald's first varsity win. In 
his first varsity appearance, 
McDonald limited the Cavaliers 
to just fmir hits. 

First Colonial catcher Chris 
Swecker continued to carry the 
brunt of the offensive load, 
delivering the big blow in the 
Patriots three-run ttiird inidng. 
Swecker bangi^d a game- 
winning two-run double. In 
First Colontal's first two games 
oi the season, Sweeper knocked 
in four runs. 

Dave Wddon took the loss fw 
the Cavaliers. 

Kempsville 6 Co% 2 

Kempsville star righthander 
Jimmy Moore recovered frwn a 
stumbling start to noteh hte 
second victory of the nason, 
defeating city rival Cox 6-2. The 
Falcons r^ched Moore for two 
runs in the bottom of die firat, 
but were shutmit the rest of t)w 
way as Moore limited the 
Falcmis to a mere three hits. In 
14 innit^ of pitching so far this 
season, Moore h^ given up jint 
four hits. 

The Ctsefs staked Mo<n% to an 
eariy lead with a three-run 
burst in the q>ening inning. The 
Chi^s knocked Cox starter 
Mark Hodges from the box with 
their openit^ innii^ outiMmt. 
Hodges woifered his first defeat 
of OienaKm. 

KempmUfe put the game oat 
of reach with two runs in &m 
seoMKi aui closed out the 
sctring wiUi a'single mariier in 
ttie third. 

The FalcMi record dropped 
^2. 



r Kl« V IC W 



District season 
to open 

this Tliursday 

The warm-ups are over now, and the real t)attle is 
set to beidn. The U Easton IHstrict baseball clul» 
will start the battle for the one league berth in the 
state baseball tournamait Thursday. The district 
season will open with five of the city teams in action 
as two-time (tefending state champion KempsviUe 
tries to close in on their sixtti consecutive league 
crown. 

Tlie Eastern District will have only one 
repreSMitative in the Eastern Regional tour- 
nament, so there will be no district tournament this 
season. The regular season champ will be the 
league representative. 

Last week, the city's total ot three undefeated 
teams dviandled to just one. Kempsville, the only 
local team still undefrated, put the only blemishes 
on First Colonial and KeUam's recwds with bacit- 
to-back wins. 



BAYSIDE 

Bayside finally got themselves untracked last 
week, gaining their first win of the season. The 
Marlins struck for seasonal highs of five runs and 
seven hits against Lake Taylor. Marty Moore 
notched his first win of the season, and Bayside 
turned in their first errorless hall game. 

The Marlins open their tUstrict season on the road 
Thursday against powerful Kempsville. The Chiefs 
won the first match-iq) 8-0 as Jimmy Moore fired a 
one-hitter at the Marlins. Moore is slated to go 
again. Bayside Coach Terry Morton will counter 
with his ace southpaw Craig Wiesner. In Wiesner's 
only mpimd appearance of the season thus far, he 
held Granby to one hit and no runs over four inn- 
ings. Runs should be a scarce commodity in the 
league opener for both clubs 

Bayside travels to Granby on Tuesday for their 
second league game. The Comets handled the first 
Marlin challenge 6-3 as faulty fielding led to 
Bayside's downfall. 

COX 

The Falcons are off to a slow start this season. 
Coach Tom Fischer's charges have dropped their 
opening two games of the campaign by a combined 
total of 12-2. 

The Falcons open their district season Thursday, 
hosting First Colonial. Both teams started the 1974 
campaign playing each other, and the Patriots 
came out the victor, 6-0. Cox travels to Booker T. 
Washington on Tuesday to complete their week's 
work. 

A lack erf hitting has been the Falcon's major 
stumbling block, during, the earl^ going. Cox has 
scored in only one of their first 14 innings. Opposing 
pitchers have held the Falcons to lust four hits. 

Offensive production will have to pick up, if 
the Falcons are to improve on last year's 3-12 mark. 

FIRST COLONIAL 

First Colonial came out of the gate quiddy 
despite fielding a generally inexperienced line-up 
The Patriots logged a 2-1 mark, during the q)ening 
weeks of the season. 

Pitching was expected to be Coach Ted Phelps' 
biggest headache. Instead, it has been a Patriot 
strongpoint. Opponents are scoring less than two 
runs a game against First Colonial mound <rf- 
ferings. The trio of Darrell Doss, Carl McDonald 
and Scott Lowry have limited oj^nents to just ten 
hits over the first 21 innings. Poss and McDonald 
has recorded the two Patriot wins. 

As e}q)ected, catcher Chris Swecker has carried 
the bulk of the offensive burden. The senior was 
instrumental in both First Colonial triumphs, 
driving in four ruhs with two extra-base hits. 

After facing Cox on lliursday, theigatriote travel 
to Maury on Tuesday. 



^^ 



m 

4 



KELLAM 

Kellam is another team (rff to a quick start. Coach 
Don Peccia has gotten some tight pitching and 
heavy hitting as the Knights moved to an early 2-1 
mark. 

The Knights open their league s^son with a 
Tuesday battle against Princ^ Anne on the road. 
The two city teams have yet to meet. 

Senior Joe Kwansy has beoi the big gun on the 
Kellam pitching staff, hurling eight scoreless inn- 
ings. Kwansy. is l-O on the season. Righthander 
Rick Bloxom has also been impressive in two 
mound appearances. 

The hitthig has been fed by catcher Scott Layden 
and first baseman Tom Morrissey. The Knights are 
averaging just under six runs a contest. 

KEMPSVILLE 

State champion KempsviUe has been the busiest 
of the city's six teams. Thnv^ns last wedk 
boosted the Chief's recoup tb-frO. * 

Pitehing has be«i the key to iCempsviUe's early 
season success. Coach Ray Barlow has received 
five complete gamra from his staff. Hie one time a 
starter faltered, sq)hom(Hre Scott O'Hara came on 
to hurl six and two-third inning of sctNreles relief in 
his first varsity perfmmance. The KempsviUe staff 
has two shutcNits to its credit and has limited op- 
^^^ents to 1.1 ruie per game. "TIk pitching tes 
definitely b^^ ahead of last year. They're carrying 
us r^iyMw," roabtdm Barlow. 

rne.uii^ may have h^dlten out d their eariy 
seanM hitting slump with 13 runs in three ganws 
last wedc. Howevo-, the Qiiels did lose one of tteir 
bdter clutch Utta^, l^ve Hansrni, to an inury. 

Kempsville's only action* this week is the Thurs- 
day emfinmtatiMi with Bayside. 

PRINCESS ANN£ 

Uttle can be said about tl» 1974 {^incess Anne 
basdMdl ecH&n. Wih ttie wei^n raistaig havoc 
with tiidr schedule, ttie Oivalkrs ^ye played just 
om time thus far this s^mm. A late raUy feU shwt 
as the Cavali«^ lo^ to First Ckriinual 3-2 in their 
seuw) (q>»^ last wedc. 

The Cavalkrs qwn their tegue season, hosting 
Lake Tuylor 'tbutka^. Cta Tlw^iy, Princes Araie 
tni^ to KeUam. 

In thetar onfy pme Ot ttie setson, Princess Anm 
re<^ved ad^uate iriteUi^ but eouU manage jiat 
four l»8e hits. TIm hittine wiD ha^ to im|»t>ve, if 
ttw QiriOiea «r« to be aerMiyB 0iaO^ms tor tlw 
league Utle. 



4 



.-■.JP,Hi^.WVJ. 



The Sun-Wednesdny. April 10, 1974-ft^rAp9_ 




Managing Rnley is problem 



OOR PAMILV eOlKA SMND 



mwo! 



ION EVE 

moiirMwiiKOM 



By JACK MURPHY 
Special to The Sun 
YUMA, Ariz.— It should be the most attractive 
job in baseball, but Dick Williams became so 
disillusioned he decided to vegetate in Florida 
rather than serve two more years of hard time for 
Charles 0. Finley. 

There is a' suggestion of extreme provocation 
when a manger will abandon a team which has 
pleasured him bv back-to-back success in the World 
series. 

Yet there are always men who will 
volunteer for Kamikaze missions and Finley has 
tound one in Alvin Dark, a manager he fired as long 
ago as 1967. Actually, Dark went looking for Finley. 
WHEN WILLIAMS announced his resignation 
within an hour after the Oakland Athletics had won 
the '73 World Series, Dark recalls of that October 
conservation. 

Dark was out of work. In<teed, he was out of 
baseball. He had gone through three jobs as a big 
league manager, the last with the Cleveland 
Indians, and he had need for funds. There are six 
Alvin Dark children including four who live with his 
first wife in Lake Charles, La., and two at his 
current residence in Miami. 

"I didn't expect Finley to take me back," says 
Dark, "You never figure to be rehired in this 
business." 

BUT NOBODY can anticipate the whims of the 
lord ?nd master of the Oakland basbaU franchise. 
Six days before the A's were due to repwt for spring 
training, Dark came in from the golf course and 
found a message asking him to phone Finley. 

"He said he wanted me to come to San Francisco 
for a man-to-man talk. I said, 'Fine,ril bring my 
clothes in case you hire me."' 

Finley was thai involved with a salary dispute 
(nine of his ballplayers took him to arbitration), 
and bark waited throughout the afternoon in San 
Francisco for an audience. Finally, they went eye- 
ball-to-eyeball for two hours. 
"Do you want the job?" asked Finley. 



"YES SIR. 1 sure do." 

"You understand it will be a one-year contract?" 

"That's fine with me." 

What salary do you have in mind?" 



"That's not for me to say," countered Dark "You 
name a figure." 

Thus the Athletics had a manager when they 
assembled in Mesa on Feb. 27, and Dark has an 
opportunity that both fascinates and repels just 
about everybody in baseball. The A's are oi a qualify 
to thrill any manager, yet Finlfey is about as easy to 
serve as Hitler. 

DARK.a bright, sensitive man, is nevertheless 
eager to try, is eager to please. 

"I'm fortunate. 1 guess I got the job because I was 
the only experienced manager available. 

"I've never had a chance to manage a team like 
this one. We not only have exceptional talent but il«> 
ballplayers have a beautiful attitude; 

"They fight each other, they criticize the owner. 
they say all sorts of wild things in the clubhwise. But 
that has nothing to do with the way (hey play 
baseball. Once a game begins, they're hell-bent on, 
winning." 

THIS IS AN instance where the manager has more 
to prove than the ballplayers. The As were sue 
cessful with Williams, and now thev'l) have to see if 
Dark will fit. At this point the athletes are cordial, 
but there is no bond of mutual affection. 

Outfielder Reggie Jackson, a free spirit, has 
acknowledged that a manager can be useful. 

"We need somebody to handle the pitching staff 
and let the rest of us play ball," says Jackson, 

Dark's larger job is to please Finley. The owner 
will be on the phone often during the season with 
constructive criticism. Some might term it second- 
guessing. Finley becomes excitable and shouts a lot 
during his constructive criticism 

Dark is 52, and he's been out of baseball for two 
and one-half seasons since splitting with the 
Cleveland Indians. During that time^ he \vas 
drawing a large salary on the remainder of his 
contract and solving problems that included 
divorce and remarriage. 

"The time away from baseball helped me im- 
mensely," he reasons, "I got myself together ^ ou 
have to be able to manage yourself before you can 
manage a ball club," 

Now if he can only find a way to manage Finlev. 



Oavaliers, Chiefs notch net wins 



Jrhe rain again was the major 
sfe-y in last week's high tlbhiwl 
t^nis action. Four matches 
wfere washed out m Friday, 
,J*iury at Kellam, Princess 
Atone at Bayside, Kempsville at 
d)x and First Colonial at 
Bboker T. Washington will all 
|«ve to be made up at a later 
d^te. 

-Earlier In the week same 
Ideal teams did find their way to 
Oe courts. On April 3, Cox 
gl^ined their first win of the 

Sason, edging Bayside 5-4. The 
arlins are now 04 on the year. 
'The Falcons trailed 4-2 after 
t£e six singles matches, but 



rallied to take all three doubles, 
matches for the win. Doug' 
Knerr continued to be a 
consistent performer for the 
Marlins defeating Steve Barry 
in their singles test 6-4, 6-3. 

ON APRIL 2. five Beach 
teams were in action. 
Kempsville bombed Bayside 9- 
0; Princess Anne easily handled 
Lake Taylor 7-2; Kellam routed 
Granby 8-1; and Maury 
defeated First Colonial 7-2. 

Kempsville registered the 
first shutout by a Beach team 
this sea8on,sweeping all singles 




Oceana golfers win 

9 

joining golf test 



• The Oceana NAS golf team 
ijpened their season on a 
winning note. The Navy team 
^aced first in a triangular meet 
with a team total d 325 at 
Sleepy Hole golf course. 
Newport News Aj^rentice was 



^msm^m^^^'^f^f^^ 



This Week 

WEONISDAV 

)rr»ek — Mysid* at Norvltw 

' Cox » tatm T»vlor 
I KempsvMI* ■» First Colonial 
Granby at Ktllam 

rannli — KemptvHIo at Craddock 

' Norfolk Catholic at Cox 

. ^ THURSDAY 

feasaball — Bayside at KampsvllM 

First Colonial at Cox 

Lake T^lor at Prlnce« Anne 

Tennli^— Kellam at Princess Anne 

I ,, SATUKOAY 

Vrack — Tidewater Relays •» 
Williamsburg 

MONDAY 

I 

QoH — Prlne«s Anne and NoHolh 
Collegiate M Lake Wrignt 
jMseMI - Bayside at Granb« 
cox at B.T Washington 
. Kellam « Prlnce« Anne 

TUCSDAY 

'oeH — Princess Anne al Swftolk 

Tennis - C<« at Lake Taylor 
First cotomal at Mairy 



Last Wssk 



itaaeMI - KempevNIc 3 First Celsnial 

I toyiMe i Lata Tayl«r 1 

1 KempsvIM * KeNam 1 

' FWt CBtonW J PrincMi Aiwa J 

• KempMlHa t Cm 3 

• KetMnt « mmimti AcHawv ft* 
I FIrM I^IMIM m MMM Wd. 



a distant second with a 340 total, 
while Christopher Newport 
College finished last with a 
team total of %Q. 

The Navy's Dick Brown was 
the match's medalist, firing a 
three-over-par 75. 



matches and the three doubles 
tests.fPbr the Chiefs, it was 
Ujeir second straight win and 
fourth on the season against only 
one defeat. 

Nothing went right for ihe 
Marlins in the loss, Kempsville 
captured all nine matches in 
straight sets, 

PRINCESS ANNE continues 
to be one of the hottest tennis 
teams in the Eastern District, 
capturing their fourth straight 
triumph with the convincing 
win over Lake Taylor. The 
Cavaliers clinched the victory 
by taking all six singles matches 
against the Titans. 

Tom Callen and Rich Banta 



remained undeleatt'd on l\w 
season Kith individual v.ius, 
Callen caplurcd his niatdi in 
straight sets 6-2, fi-4 Banta had 
to struggle but still managed U) 
lake Ills rnatchH-n, 2-t, ^^---ir " 

KKI,I.\M HKBOl NDKi) 

from their loss to Keiiipsvilk' 
two weeks ago with an 8-1 nuit 
of Granby, It was the Knij.'hts 
second 8-1 detision of ihr 
season, pushing their record to 
2-1. 

The Knights , clinched the 
triumph with five singles 
victories, all but one coinmR in 
straight sets. To complete I lie 
rout, Kellam also look all three , 
doubles tests. 

FIRST rOI,OM,\l. suffered 
their first defeat of the season 
agaiast Maurv: The defending 
Eastern District champion 
Commodores broke open a closo 
c^)ntest with an overpowcriiif:; 
doubles perfprmance for the 7-2 
win. 

The Patriots had staved close 
to the league power, trailing 4-2 
after the smgles end of the 
competition. Maury put the 
contest out of reach, taking all 
three doubles matches. The 
Commodores are undefeated on 
the season. 



Sports Record 



First Colonial W Granby 33 
Maury M Princess. Anne «3 
First Colonial at Cox ppd. 

OoM — First Colonial 303, Kempsville 3M, 
and Princan Anne 311 

Tennts — Cox 5 Bayside 4 
Kempsville e Bayside 
Princess Anne 1 Lake Taylor J 
Kellam I Granby 1 
Maury 7 First colonial 3 
Mairy at Kellam ppd 
PriAcen Anne at Bayside ppd. 
Kempsville al Cox ppd. 
First Colonial at B T Washington ppd 



Baseball 



Swf kr r 
i wry n 
All/ri 



■ayude 
ab I 



KgrJb 
WsnrH 
Trktn lb 2 
Atoorep 
TynrrI 
Osbrn cf 
Foskey ?b 
Milirss Q 
Jnnngs c 
Lneph 
Totals 



li bi 

2 10 
4 12 1 
I 1 

3 110 
3 11 
3 3 3 3 
3 

10 
10 10 

23 5 9 5 



Lake Taylor 

ab r h bi 

VanArdl rf 4 10 
AAcGrttn3b 
Lthn lb 
Crsi If 
Wdwrd 2b 
Twnsn ss 



aoo ^' 
tio ^i 



Jrratf - IMMKi W Ca« It 



t m ST. 



Tennis 

Cox t Bedside 4 

Unties Jknw^ (B> d. S. Barry, « 4, 6 3. 

Butler (B) d. Frkeman, it, tl: 
' Geni (B) d. Sun, 4 3, *^3, 

Warner IB) d. Waddell, 1 %. l-», «-4, 

Barry Id d Hail. 6T, « l; 

AsplnwBl (C) d Randall, '*-7. 6). 
OovMas— S.Barry M Barry (C)d. Knerr 
wemar, *-4, 4 4; 

Freem» Son (CI d Butl«r43enl. «, 

' Wadell Asplnwall (C» d. Randall 
Foreman, »3, 0.4, 4-1. 

KempsyNle f BaysMe • 

j — O-Mwa (K) d. Knerr, 41, 40; 
'Br«i« (K) d Butler, H, 4 1, 
MMIIar >K) d. Gent. 4 2, 4^1, 
Mtmctlie (K) d. Warner, 7-4, 41, 
RIondet (K) d. Halt, 41, 4-3; 
Mamll (K) d «»nd«l, 4^1. 4-1. 

— 0*Mara,M(Har (Kid. Knerr 
wartiar. 4-1, ♦■>; 

Brandl^iandet (ICI d Butter ^em, *• 

3, f-li 

BcMsn««ltclw« (K) d. Foreman Hall, 
4^1.4^3, 

PrMces* Amm 7 Lake Taylar 1 

SUiBlei — ¥m¥K (PAI d, Oreyis, 4-3, 4-1. 
Crtlen (WH. W H ^ m m m, »3. »4. 
■M (PA) d. 0>mm, 3-4, 4-3, 4^4, 
■MM (PA> d BWkS. 4^0. 3.4. 4-4; 

%mfm (PAI d eprwien. 4* 74, 
C^vlncy (PA) d KuhMey, »3. 4 4 

— 'MunlerCallen (PAi «. 
, 4-1, 4-t. 

Oreyit-CfMeki (LT) «. SaVBanla, 4-3,< 
4^t; 

•Mki-p«« tiT) m. tmimmatmt k, «.i. 



Brnlcf 
aollp 
Wlknsp 
PImr ph 
Vqrc 
•Totals 



00 
1 

3 00 
1000 
2 
10 10 

1110 
10 00 
21 1 4 



:,e(bu 3ii 
Bwmn 3b 
TolBis 



? ^'^ 

2 10 ''"' 

\ i'l '. n 

1 !" !'• 

2 ^ ' 
2 

22 0' 2 r 



Kemowille 

1 
B^ - Bowman L,p ^ 
Colonial I 28 V( 



rf 



n 



Harrison yy !2 01 
LO*ry L (0 )i 



H R EH 



5 3 



Bayside 

Lake Taylor 



111 010 5 9 
000 000 1 1 4 2 



E - Woodward 2 LOB Bayside 4, Lake 
Taylor 4, 3B •■ (Jsborne ■ 



MooreWd 2) 
Boll L (0 1) 
Welkins 
Balk 



IP H R ER BB SO 

7 4 10 7 6 
5 6 5 4 2 6 
2 3 3 3 
Moore 



First Colonial 

ab r b 61 
Oglecf 3 Moor II 

Bwmnss 3 Smitttlb 
McDnldlf 3 Prtess 
DOSS lb 3 OHr r» 



Kempsville 

ab r li bl 

3 no 

2 11 
J 

3 



First Colonial Princ»s Anne 

ab r h bi 
Oqlecl 2 bordri 

Bwmn ss J i J vv'isn . ' 
McDnldo 4 1 J Brov, 
Do^slb 10 5^y, 

Swckrc 3 2 2 Shhnji; o i u ii 

Lwry r( p -3000 Clbrtsn t< 2(1 
ShIbyTb 3 Btistsrr i ? 

<^w5k H 10 10 vifl.i- , 
Bw^nn lb 3 c,rn. 

Totals 77 3 « 2 RuSSi ,11 , • 

Tolals 27 J 4 



Princess Ann* 



OOO iW 

000 300 



THE 



BOM>ONES 



BTj^i 



e. 



v^ieekd^llPM 



SWIMMING 
POOL 



wnNAQiMUiyeiNkT 



by Nations, ^c. 



,.-^!'iii' 



n J 



1 : '^t 



M 



[ai 



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AT 5020 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 



PHONI 
497-2471 
497.2479 

M^« ■&«▼ AC matiS&MOt lOAd AT C^HM'COMB. OUT OP TOWMH tAM Vf. 44 

i2^,.V. . ,,,,.^S*^a5,^^lA •ACH»VO.PIK)CIIDaiUXICSTOPWTtW^ 



mmmmmmmmmmm 



HgH A-10-The Sun-Wednesday, April 10. 1974 



Arts 



(■Continued from page A-1) 

The symphony received $3,000 
frwn City Council last year, 
primarily for capital 
expenditures, Dr. Saunders 
said. The funds went toward 
purchase of instrunrents. 

"I don't understand how they 

can legitimately cut it (the 

■ budget request) in half," he 

said. "There is no way we can 

imfWove mirselves this way, 

"WK IM)NT WANT to be a 
leech on City Council, but we 
want to ask them for funds to be 
strong enough to stand oft 'our 
own two feet. 

"I am very, very 
disappointed in the City 
Council." he said. "We're going 
to have a terrible time meeting 
our expenses." 

The Dance Guild of Virginia 
(formerly Tidewater Dance 
Guild) is the only arts group in 
the commission scheduled to 
receive its entire budget 

request. 



It requested $2,7% and will 
receive that amount in the 
proposed budget. The Dance 
Guild requested the fund; to 
bring a dialogue-live 
performance version of the 
ballet "Peter and the WolF' to 
local school children. 

"We're very pleased— we're 
delighted," said Vija 
Cunningham, a director of the 
dance company. "It's very 
good news." 

TIIK DANCK GUILD 

originally requested $5,440, 
reduced to $2,720 by the 
commission budget committee. 
The guild plans to ask the 
Virginia Commission of the Arts 
and Humanities for a matching 
amount to include more schools 
in its dance program. 

Dr. Saunders said that the 
symphony is unlikely to receive 
any additional funds from the 
state commission. 

"The chances are very bad of 
us getting anything this year 
from them," he said. 



"Everything in the past has 
gone to the Norfdk Symphony." 
Dr. Saunders said that the 
Norfolk Symphony's budget 
exceeded a quarter of a millimi 
dollars this year. 

The biggest shock to all 
commission members was the 
cut to ihe commission's budget. 
Laura Lambe, chairwoman of 
the commission, said that it will 
be unable to produce its hope- 
ed for combined arts product^ 

next spring without the city 
funds. 

"I .HIST DON'T think it's 
fair." said Frances Mustek, 
member of the commission's 
executive committee. 

"We haven't been given a 
penny yet, and this is all we 
have to operate on this year and 
next." Mrs. Musick said. 

Mr. Balderson was also 
disturbed about the cuts to the 
commission's request. 

"Laura (Lambe) was very 
anxious to have something 
combining the talents of all the 



ptnqa in the commission," Mr. 
Balderson said, refering to the 
(rianned arts prochiction. "I 
know she'll be disappointed." 
Dr. Safthders echoed Mr. 
Balderson's feelings. "They 
form a commission, and then 
they won't fund it," he said. 
"Laura has done a beautiful job 
on this. She has bled to get this 
commission going. 



"I THOUGHT THE* reason 
for the formation of the 
commission was so all this 
budget cutting could be 
eliminated from City Council's 
responsibility," he said. "City 
CoHncil set up the commission 
itself, tMit I don't think they 
i^erstand that these things 
take money." 

"This is a real blow." said 
Chairwoman Lambe. "The 
money they will give us is 
enough only for basic 
administrative costs. I am 
exceedingly disappointed." 

Mrs. Lambe said she had 
hoped the commission could 



sponsor the arts productiwi in 
1975 to "showcase the purpose 
and. achievements <tf the arts 
and Iwmanities commission." 

BUT. SHE SAID, "We fe^ we 
cannot achieve much with only 
enough mon^ for l>asic costs. 

"We've all worked so hard to 
get this commission going," she 
said. "I thoughtCi^ Council was 
serioDsi«b(Hit wantii^ it when 
they appointed the 
c(»nmission." 

The proposed budget was 
presented to City Council by 
City Manager Roger Scott last 
wedc. 

It is still subject fb review and 
may be changed by the Council, 
said Giles Dodd, city finance 
director. The budget will be 
adopted after a public hearing 
and two readings, he said. 

It must be adopted by the 
Council by May 31, he said. If it 
is not adopted ' by the 
councilmen by that date, it is 
automatically adopted as 
originally presented, he said. 




To check 
Not to check 

You may participate In the 1976 
Presidential Election Campaign 
Fund by checking the box on your 
tax form 1040 or 1040A. This will 
designate $1 (or $2 on a joint < 
return) to a nonpartisan fund. 
If you didn't do so last year, 
you can also check a box for 1 972. 
This will not reduce your refund 
or increase your tax. 




'^ffl 




1 
















. . a Day for Rayer and Rejaici^^ 

And a Jay for tainilies to join togetner in tne remem- 
trance of tliat miraculous mom. A day for all to renew tneir 

f aitk an J trotkerkooa and love. Once a^ain^ tne 
wonaer ana awe of Easter will be celeDrated 

in joyful son^ ana heartfelt prayer. Once a^ain, 
tkere will te a glow of nappiness witnin us as tne world 
celebrates tne most joyful time of tne year--tnis season 

of deep and gratifying spiritual warmtn. We wisn 
all of you tke blessings of Easter. As eacb of us 
seeks inner peace, we kope tkat gladness and 

glory will ke in tke kearts of every family 

- - in tke kearts of tke family of mankind. 



UTEND 



CS^ 




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■■4 



Bn - 



BAYUKfllNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Shore Drive, Vii^iiia Beach 

464-2423 
ByroB S Hdbtead, Minister 

Day of Prayw of S«lf D«nl«l S«rvle« - Siturdax. April J3th-10:3O im 
to 12:30 pm - Spontorad Dy tha Unltod Mathodlst woman. 

Eattar Sunday Sarvica* - Sunrlsa Sarvica at Ft. Story - 6:15 am - 
Ea$tar Breakfast at the Church - 7:30 am to 9ieo am - Church 
Schooli 9:30 am'- Morning Worihlp! 11:00 am - Sermon "He Uvei 

Spadai Easto- Music by aiJ Choirs 

(Baylaka United Mathodlst Church Is located on Shore Drl»e, ih 
mite East of Amphib Base, across from Baywilla Farms.) 



THALIA LYNN BAPTIST CHURCH 

4392 ^^^ Be«di Mvd. 

ftev. Jtmita E. Foster, Jr. 

t Swviccii ftnter S^ool 9:4S AM. - Omr* Smkc 8:30 
iyf441:00iai 

at Moiatag Scnka • **N(^i^ Now to F^* 




"na C(Mpri AecoaMil to 



RQCK CHURCH 

640 Kempivflle Road, V^iiiia Beach 
Phone: 497-3727 

Suday Mofnlog lUWun • Rev. Ouk tqrkic, Miiaioaaiy, wB be 
with us Eaater Sunday, Apiffl 14th thro Thnnday, A|»l 18th. Set- 
vkM evoy cveaing at 7:30 pm. 



Tuesday thru Thursday, April 16th thru llth - Morning at 10i30 am 

April nth thru I3th at Camp Owalssa - Easter Youth Retreat - Con- 
tact Church Office for Details 



FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 

372 Ndmi Une, Virginte Be«^, Va. 
(Between HaynM ft Zaym, crft Vj^^ BMKfc Bhrd.) 

I^rtor-Rev. Frederick W. CaffoO . 
Apd 12-Good Frki^ Smtec 7:30 PM 

■wtoT i,liHilti«*t 
i^l4-Eaitar^ndi9 



&iM^SdKM-9:4SAll 
'mwValiiRairt* 



11:00 iUI 



i7:00ni 



FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

1341 Laddn Rowi 

Welcomes You To its replar Sunday Setvice at 1 1 :00 AM. 
Read from the Dedc will be selections from the King James 
Version of THE BIBLE and from the Christian Science Text- 
bo<*. Science and health with key to the Scriptures by 
Mary Baker Eddy. On April 14th you will hear readings on 
the subject "Are Sin, Disease & DeaHTlleal?" 

Sunday Sdiool AlK> 1 1 :C|P AM 
Nunery Can AvMMt 



Everyone is Welcome 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

4750 Bnt« Rd.. Vl^|biia Bmmji, Va. 

Phoqt: 497^4208 

P^iA)r-W.F.Gran<ytaff 

R^dar SMdi}r Scsviccs 

RcfM Ser^cci Apr! 14tli tlni Apil 21rt at 7:30 PM 

Rev.CJ.MarttaiJr. 
Wpb$tiMEfagriist 

EwHyooe Wd^ne 
taaS«rftot»ABtoyieca ■* 

«MM8 Off 4974681 



EASTER#RVICES 

ELIZABETH RIVER BAPTIST CHURCH 

601 Spanow Rd., Cheaapeake 
4204478 

6:30 AM Community Eastei Sumrtae Sovice - 9M t 11:00 
AM Worship Smlce • Topic: "He b Rften." - 9:45 AM ■ 
Sunday School • 6: 15 PM • Training Program ■ 7:30 PM - 
Evening Wondiip ■ Topic: "A Look Into H^ven." 

Rev. Letcher H. Reid, hutor 



PROVIDENCE FRIENDS 

CHURCH 

5340 Providenot Road, Virginia Baach 

Rev. Duane Rice, hutor ' 
^0-^89 

Revival Now in Progrets 

7:30 Each Evening 

Rev. Tmbii Mangrym, Evang^ist 



■aw 



SUnDML 



IJfcStyl€$ 



FOOD 



Visiting 

maestro 
conducts 



The conductor's baton was flying and the 
music brought bursts (rf applause as energetic 
conductor-composer Karel Husa led the 
Kellam High School Wind Ensemble in a 
performance of his '/Music for Prague 1968" 
last week at the school. Mr. Husa won a 
Pulitzer Prize for the composition in 1969 and 
the Wind Ensemble won a superior rating for 
performing the work in the recent District W 
Band Festival. The conductor, originally from 
Czechoslovakia, is now a Kappa Alpha 
professor of music at Cornell University. 
Kellam band students and band parents raised 
the money to bring Mr. Huisa to Virginia 
Beach. 




Sun photos 



Kempsviiie Higtt 
to present Taust^ 




After 18 months of planning, 
researching and rehearsing, 
students at Kempsviiie High 
School in the German Theatre 
of Kempsviiie are ready With an 
ambitious production . of 
Goethe's German tragedy 
"Faust." 

The ihree-hour product ion, 
presented in high German with 
English synopses and 
narration, will be performed for 
the general public April 20 at 
7:30 p.m. in the Kempsviiie 
High School Alice West 
Auditorium. 

The public performance will 
be preceded by a special VIP 
night showing April 19 for an 
invited audience. 

Approximately 200 students 
will participate in the 
production, one of the most 
ambitious ever undertaken by 
high school students. 

Members of the German 
Theatre of Kempsviiie are 
senior-level students who have 
studied German fw at least'foiir 
or five years, said Willem 
Hamel, German teacher at 
Kempsviiie High and producer- 
director of the production. 

German students have also 
formed an orchestra and 
written their own music to 
provide full orchestration for 
the tragedy. German students 
and other interested students 
have also formed a choral group 
accompanying the play. 

THE STUDENTS have been 
involved in designing their own 
sets, researching the period of 



the play (16th Century), making 
their own costumes and writing 
their own music, Mr. Hamel 
said. The students have planned 
the production for one and one- 
half years, he said. 

"Faust" was a lifelong work 
for the author, Johann 
Wolfgang von Goethe, Mr. 
Hamel said. It is essentially the 
traf^c story of Gretchen, a 17- 
year-old girl seduced by the 
genius Dr. Faust, who is 
transformed from an old man to 
a youthful rogue after making a 
blood pact with the devil. 

The siuden(s have received 
financial support from the 
German-American community 
of Tidewater and the 
Stammtisch German-American 
club of Virginia Beach and 
Nwfolk, Mr. Hamel said. 

ALTHOUGH THE production 
is in high German, he said that 
it can be easily understood by 
non-German speaking people. 
Program synopses in English 
will be provided as well as an 
(tff-stage English narration. 

Invited to the special VIP 
night April 19 are parents of all 
students in the play, members 
(rf the City Councils and School 
Boards of Virginia Beach and 
Norfolk, superintendents <rf all 
Tidewater schools, 
administrators -in the State 
, Department of Education in 
Richmond, .supervisors of 
foreign languages in all public 
schools in Virginia, instructors 
in German, English, education 
and foreign languages at. Old 



Dominion University, Nwfdk 
State College and the College of 
William and Mary and various 
school principals. 

Also invited are Rep. G. 
William Whitehurst, the 
German consul in Washington, 
D.C. and members of the 
German Goethe Society of 
Washington, D.C. Members of 
the German- American 
community of Tidewater will 
also attend the VIP opening. 

AOMI.SSION IS free for the 
general public on April 20. 
However, Mr, Hamel said that 
seating is limited and 
reservations are necessary. 

Reservations may be made 
by writing the German Theatre 
of Kempsviiie, 574 Kempsviiie 
Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 
23462. Reservation requests 
should be accompanied by a 
stamped, self-addressed 
envelope. 

Reservations may also be 
made by calling the group's 
answering service at 497-3124. 

Although admission is free, 
Mr. Hamel said' that anyone 
wishing to make a donation 
after the performance will be 
helping to defray production 
expenses. The group also hopes 
to use donations to establish a 
scholarship fund for German 
Theatre students. 

The three-hour production 
will include two intermissions. 
Refreshments will be served at 
both intermistrtons. 



NEW CONDUCTOR 

Walter Noona takes over 
at local Civic Symphony 



In the Virginia Beach Civic 
Symphony's setrchf^ new 
talent, Walter moviL has 
agreed to Keeorti* the 
symphony's new conductor. 

Wr. Noona, who actually 
began working with the 
symphony last week, replaces 
conductor Alberto Asercion. 

"I am anxious to see the 
cultural aspect of the 
community grow especially as 
far as the symphony goes, and if 
I can help in anyway that's what 
I want to do." wys Mr. Noona. 

THE SYMPHONY has been 
under going changes and 
looking for "new blood" for the 
group since the election of new 
(rfficers in January. The group 
is trying to change its image 
and expand performances to 
include all types of music. 

"We've got a good 
instrumental sek:tion, but the 
siring section has lo grow," 
says Mr. Noona. "And I'm sure 
there's talent in the area." 

Mr, %09na, who is also 
conductor of iht Virginia Beach 
Chorus, plans to continue 
wm-king with Oie cirrus and 




NOONA 

hopes to see the two groups 
perform jointly in the coming 
years. He says there are 
numerous pieces of music that 
call for a chorus, orchestra and 
soloists. 

EACH GROUP would have its 
own concerts, but once in awhile 
the two could come together to 
do something really exciting for 



jflMi|audience.!lMy*Mr, Noqna, 
YHe also points out it could save 
the two «ri fiprauiiptinoney. the 
Civic Chorus, which hired a 
partial orch«8(ra for its 
Christmas performance, is still 
paying off that $1,500 fee.) 

But the first thing to be done, 
accwding to Mr. Noona, is to 
raise the level of the music the 
Civic Symphony is playing. The ■ 
spring concert, originally 
scheduled for May 25-26, has 
been postponed until June to 
allow Mr. Noona to order 
additional music. He plana a 
fOTmat, as he has used with the 
Civic Chorus in the past, that 
will "educatt as well as 
entertain with something for 
everyone," 

Other than his conducting, 
Mr. Noona (days the piano with 
ihe Waller Noona Trio al ih? 
Harbor Club. He also performs 
at the Norfolk Yacht and 
Country Chib and with the 
Norfolk Symphony. He and his 
wife, Carol, teach private piano 
lessons and are completing 
Work on a piano instruction 
course called "Mainstreams in 
Music." 



By any other name,she's 
still your mother-in-law 



There's never been much 
question about what to call 
your mother-in-law if she 
wasn't around, but what do 
you call her to her face? 

"Mother" has always 
seemed to me a word 
reserved for one's own. I 
mean, I might be crazy over 
my moth«--in-lai«i^ut shfr 
could never compete with 
my chiI(fi)ood images of 
mama at the bade door 
handing out hot buttermilk 
biscuits to me and my 
nei^borhood pals. And it 
wasn't her hand that held 
my five-year-old hand so 1 
could sleep after waking to 
Uie terrifying sounds oi the 
local fire engine. 

If one waits long enough, 
and mother-in-law stays in 
h«- comer long enough, the 
marriage nwy be blessed 
witti chilch^n, and then the 
prd}lem is partially solved 
by rolling Mit wch ben^ 
wcrcite as Gaga, Nana and 
g^xtd old Grandma. But for 
the wife, the nwther-in-law 
is still not het ^ndhia. 

AND FORGET in- 
structions to call her 
whatever makes you 




comfortable. 1 feel com- 
fortable wiUi first namra, 
but when I tried it the 
feeling wasn't mutual. I 
have a mother-in-law who 
can smile with one eye and 
cry with the other, and wten 
I said, "How abmit an<^er 
helping rf yams, Bertha?" 
her left eye filled. 

So, over the years, I have 
managed by various 
methods. "Ask your motiier 
if she wmild like VMxe 
yams," is a good one. Or 
catch her eye and hdd iq> 
Uw yams wUle raning you* 
eyebrows in qu^tion. Try 
pointing ami saying "she" 
(But don't try this cme 
unless you want to see both 
ey^ fiU.) 



USING NAMES, after all, 
is simply a way of getting a 
person's attention, and I've 
found I can do that by hitting 
a p«i with a spoon, blowing 
a police whistle or entering 
a room with my dress on 
backwards. 

Of course it would be a lot 
easier to just say "Bertha," 
Iwt life isn't afways that 
simple. 

So wlwn my wm marries 
I'll remember to tell his wife 
whatever sl% wants to call 
me is just fine as Icx^ as it 
isn't too formal, too flif^Mnt, 
too phoney or too im- 
personal. And I never wAild 
Inve knoim that if it man't 
fm* wh«t's4Mr-name. 



Pl«e B'2-The Sun-Wednesday, AprtI 10, 1974 



FOOD 



Young dancers peiform 



Smart consumers stay on the alert yif/f/j Jeffrey H Monday 



for seasonal shifts in food supplies 



Bv CATHY B.HINTON 

Virginia Department 

of Agriculture 

Springtime has arrived! 

It's accompanied by the 
arrival of fresh strawberries, 
cantalopes, watermelons, 
asparagus and green onions in 



local stwes. Mafiy stwes are 
running sale prices on these 
items, giving an opportunity to 
add variety to meals while 
.saving some mbney. 

As these crops become more 
plentiful, prices will go down 
even more. It's up to you to keep 
posted on the supply and price 



situation. 

BRCAUSR food prices are 
sucl^ a CMitroversial subject of 
main concern to everyone, the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
has initiated a new program 
called "Food Marketing Alert." 
This program will release a 



Watching that cholesterol 
helps healthy eating habits 



If paroits estabUA good 
eating habits fn- their diil- 
dren, they're giving tiieni Qie 
gift of longer, healthier lives. 

Cholesterol shouldn't be 
just a mysterious medical 
term for the fatty substmoe in 
certain foods that finds its 
wi^ into Qie blood stream 
and^ eventiudly builds up on 
the walls of the arteries. Cho- 
lesterol should be a houadidd 
word ... it's that important to 
your health. In^moat homes, 
unfortunately, it is a houae> 
bold item - on Iht di% 
nwnu. 

Your body needs some cho- 
testerol, which it manufac- 
tures natural]^. But too much 
cholesterol in your blood is 
one of the major factors 
linked with an increased risk 
of heart and blood vesad dis- 
eases, and saturated fats — 
found mainly in fbods of aid- 
mal origin — are (»ie of die 
aubrianoes in foods ttiat pro- 
duce ch(destcrol. It foUows, 
' Bien, diat less saturated fat in 
your det and less cholestODl 
in your bkwd means you have 
a better chance for maintain- 
ing a healthy heart 

IMs doesn't mean you have 
to give up the fun of eating, 
just the excess of cholesterol 
and saturated fat in idiat you 
eat For an easy way to go 
tboat it see the new American 
Heart Association CooHbook. 
It offers mm dian 400 km- 
fat, ktw-cbokstool recipes 
for everything from appetis- 
en to desaerta. This is a cotdf 



book deiUcated to "The Pleaa- 
urea of Eating WeU While 
Eatii« Right" It's available 
at yow local bookstore. We 
Americans are notorious 
overeaters. It shows in our- 
aehres, in our cMklren, and in 
our rates of heart disease, and 
it's time we Parted doing 
aametUng about it 

Here is an intereadng meal 
taken from among die many 
delkidus redpes in die Amer- 
ican Heart Aaaodation Cook- 
book. Try eaidi week's recipe 
as it is pubUriied. 

CHICKEN 
JERUSALEM 
2 table^Mons oil 
1 2H-3 pmuid fryer,^ cut into 
serving pieces 
Seasoned flour 
^ pound fresh mushroons, 
cut in pieces 



artichoke 



1 jar marinated 
Iwarts, drained 

2 ckives garlic, minced 
IV4 teaapoona salt 

V^ teaspoon Oregano 
^ teasiwon pepper 
2 ciq» canned or fredi 
matoei 
^ cup sherry 



to- 



Fteheat oven to 350 degreei 
F. 

HMt oil in frying pn. 
Dredge diidten pieces in Ma- 
soned flour and brawn in oil 
tiace in casserde witti murii- 
roonis and arttdioke hearts. 
Stir garlic and apices with to- 
matoes; pour over diicken. 

Bake m hours, or until 
tender, adcUng dimy diffing 
last few minutes of booking 
dme. 

Yidd: Foiff servings. 



monthly summary of the 
nation's food supfriy situatfon to 
the news media. In addtioe, 
special alerts wiU be issued 
when specific supply situations 
exist 

For example, this month 
special alerts were rdeased on 
beef and turkey. According to 
the releases, beef ou^ut is 
higher Uian last ApriPs low 
levf 1, so consumers should look 
fn- baef barpiins. 

Many retailers have reduced 
prices and offer specials which 
reflect the current supply 
situation. Many consumers will 
take advantage of this supply- 
price sitmtion by stocking up 
home freezers. 

Another alert was issued for 
turkeys. If you haven't n(^ced, 
turkey prices have been cmning 
dowa "Turkeys wiU be availaUe 
in near record quaritities in 
April. Turkey has become a 
year 'round food adding 
essential nutrients and delicious 
taste to menus. 

If you're a budget-conscious 
consumo*, what you include on 
your daily m«iu is influenced by 
the sup^y situation. "Food 
Marketing Alert" will help you 
take advantage of lower prices 
for commodities which are in 
temporary over-supply. > 

You can take advantage of the 
price supply situation by 
including beef and turkey in 
some imaginative spring 
menus. 



»: 



' idv. 

FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

B; PAUL ROMAN 

Like Cinnamon toast? Try 
taking a powdered gelatin, 
' putting it in a salt shaker and 
shake on hot buttered toast. 
Zowie, the kkls will love it! 
Powdered drink mixes will 
also work. 

A few drops of lemwi juice 
added to the cooking water 
will help keep Cauliflower 
wWte. 

Soup cr sauce too sal^? 
Slice a raw potato, drop it in 
the soi|i, bring to a bdl, 
simmer a few minutes, 
remove potato and Presto! 
no longer too salty! 

FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
MEAL ■ aPBClALIZING 
IN CHARBROILED 
STEAKS, MEXICAN FOOD| 
AND LOW. LOW PRICES 
- TRY THE 



California Stew 

(Serves 6) 



:^ 



2 labtotpoont talad oil 

2 pound! boned chuck, 

cut into IVk-lnch cube* 

2 teaspoons mH 

1 laMoapoon EACH 

paprika and vin«gar 

1 teaspoon dried maioram 

2 bay leavM 

1 cup water or boot bouillon 

4 pared matflum petatoot, halvvd 

• imdiuffl while onlont, halved 

4 pared madlum carrots, halved 

2 celery •Islhs, 

. cut Into 2-inch pieces 



HEAT OIL in preaaure cooker or tajicepan. Irown beef. 
Add all Items txoepi vegetables. 

PREPARATION ALTERNATIVES 
PRESSURE COOKER on slectric surface unit, or electric 
pressure cooker: Cook at 15 pounds prsssura for I minutes. 
Reduce pressure immtdlstsly by placing pan under cold 
running water. Add vegetablaa, cook at IS pounda preeaure 
lor an additional 1 2 minutes. Reduce pressure Immediately. 
NEVER FILL PRESSURE COOKER MORE THAN 2/3 PULL. 

LARGE SAUCEPAN on electric surface unit: Prepare aa 
directed, adding an additional 1 cup liquid. Simmer meat 
1 hour and 4S minutes, add vegstablas; cook an additional 
30 to 35 minutes or until vegetables are fork-lsnder. 

A GUIDE TO CONSERVE ENERGY 

COOKING IN A covsrsd saucepan on an electric range is 
20 to 40% LESS EFFICIENT than cooking In a preaaure 
cooker. 



N 




m LASKIN ROAD 



A Second Career: 

Welcome Wagon 

Intttnatiooal, Inc. 
WANT TO AVOID 
1HE9T0SJ0B? 

Are you a "people per- 
son"? Want to develop 
your talents? Enjoy a 
challenge? Appreciate your 
earning for your effort? 
FULL AND PART TIME 
POSITIONS 
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN: 

ARAGONA 

PEMBROKE 

THOROUGHGOOD 

LAKE EDWARD 

KEMPSVILLE 

BEACH PROPER 




Dance Gui/d presents 
^Movement Potpourri 



"A Movement Potpourri," the 
last performance vi the season 
for the Dance Guild of Virginia, 
is scheduled for Saturday and 
Sunday at the Chrysler Museum 
Theatre, Norfolk. 

The performance will 
encompass ~ various dance 
themes — ^usic and dance, 
story and dance and art and 
dance. "A Movement 
Potj)ourri" will include the 
Tidewater premiere (rf "Bees," 
a composition for Moog 
Synthesiwr by Virginia Beach 
Composer Tom Rice. Vija 
Cunningham, a Guild director. 



ch(»-e(^aphed "Bees," as well 
as the selection "Swingsession," 
"Danse" and "Idyl," for 
the jirogram. 

Guild dancer Heidi Rob^sfads 
will present two classical ballet 
dances and a character daiKe. 

Tickets for the dance 
program are free <A chM^e to 
children of Chrysler Museum 
members and 50 cents for adult 
museum members. Tickets for 
non-museum members are 50 
cents for children and, $1 for 
adults. Curtain time 4 10:30 
a,m. Saturday and 3 p.m. 
Sunday. 



ALSO CALL A'BOUT OUR 

NEW PROGRAMS. 
Pisuant ntighbomood carssr, 
salM and community back- 
ground helpful, car raqolrsd, 
will train. Call TODAY for 
Information and Intarvtow 
340-2131 b«for* 5 PM. EOE 



BEST PlCTURi 
OF THE YEAR 



^ 



^ 



tJJ^'^SSja 



AGi9te€R0VHUfllM ■ 

THBSmNO 

WINNER OF 7 ACADEMY AWARDS 





0*« S VMWO ■ aCXKa BdvMU • TONV BU and W:MA£t i Aik* (**^« 

IMiBIGWaiC 

KAnMOAT: 

\m » It us ?:« N«a 





Easter Bunny at 
annual egg hunt 



The Easter Bunny will make a special 
appearance Saturday at the sixth annual Easter 
egg hunt sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Department of PaHcs and Recreatioa 

Raggedy Ann and Andy also will appear 
(hiring the hunt, which will begin at 11 a.m. in the 
picnic area <rf Princess Anne Paric, Princess 
Anne and Landstown Roads. 
. Pre-school age and first grade children are 
eligible to hunt for hidden candy eggs. Special 
prizes will be awarded to children finding silver 
and gold eggs. 

All children are asked to bring Easter baskets 
or paper bags to collect the eggs. 




425-9335 



P 'nPIFNTAI ART^ £ rill 



ORIENTAL ARTS & CURIOS 

HOURS: 10 *.m. TO 5:00 p.iB. 
CLOSED SUN. k MON. 

716 FIRS-fiCOLUNIAL 
HILLTOP WKST 

(tkhiml Mclliinaldsun I a.skin Kd.) 



The Jeffrey II ballet 
company, of flie New York City 
American Ballet Center, will 
perform at B p.m. Mmiday at 
Chnvler Hall, Ncrfolk. 

The Joffrey II ensonble is a 
branch of tiw main Joffrey 
ballet compaqy. It is compoaed 



x^^.. 



CiH.^OH 



BK\l IV S VI <»Ns 



Shampoo S Set fronn $3.25 

Complete Permonenf Wove» $6.95 fo $19.95 

gowK Fonci-Tone Touch-up From $5 00 

Roux Frosting (Shompoo I Sol Ixiro) $12.50 

Haircut $2.75 (Long Hair $3.50) 

No Appointment Necessary — Just Come In 



HILLTOP 
DAILY • 8 'TIL 6:30 



Hllttoo Plata SI*oppln« Cantar 
Latkln Rd. MMt to Sataway 
Phona: 43t-9S97 
Va, BMdi 



DAILY -9 TIL 6 
THURS. - 9 'TIL 9 



SllSVa. Baach Blvd. 
AcroH from GEX 
Bfona: 497-9769 
Va. Baach 



1734 C. 

Uttia Craak na. 
Naxt to ZayrM 
Riona: Sat-9093 
Norfolk 



of 12 young dancers raiding in 
age from 16 to 20. The ensemble 
performs to taped misic rather 
than a full ordiestra like the 
main ballet company, allowing 
them to trdvel and appear for 
one night performances. 
The Joffrey n performance in 



Norfolk will offer a variety erf 
numbers from classical ballet 
to numbers arranged especially 
for the ensemble. The program 
will inclwie dance numbers 
entitled "Mother's Mozart '73," 
"Knoxville: Summer at 1915." 
"Schumann — Opus 6" and 




"Facade,". 

AIVIONG THK Joffrey II 
company dancers are Nancy 
Thuesen and David Coevas, 
who both studied at Tidewater 
area daiKe studios. Mr. Cuevas 
shidied with Gene Hammett in 
Norfolk, and Ms. Thuesen was 
one of the wiginal members of 
the Dance Guild of Virginia 
(formeriy the Tidewater Daraw 
Guild) when it was wganized in 
1965. 

Ms. Thuesen will teach a 
master dance class at the 
Dance Guild, 5772 Arrowhead 
Drive, at 10:30 a.m. Monday. 
The master class is open to all 
area ballet students at the 
intermediate level or above. 
Students may register for the 
class by calling the Dance Guild 
at 499-7925 from 1 to 7 p.m. Fee 
for the class will be $4. 

Other members of the Jtrff rey 
II company to perfra-m in 
Norfolk include Conchifa 
Blazquez, Carol Messmer, 
Sharon Pederson, Jody Wintz, 
Rachel Ganteaume, Michael 
Bjerknes, Jerel Hilding, 
Richard Wakal, Philip Jerry 
and Andrew Levinson. The 
company is under the direction 
of Jonathan Watts. Sally 
Brayley is the assistant 
director. The Chrysler Hall 
performance is being sponsored 
by Capital Productions. 

Tickets for the Joffrey II 
performance are $5, $6 and $7, 
and are available at all 
Ticketron locations. 



NANCY THEUSEN OF JOFFREY II 




FOR THE FUTURE 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

members Sen. A. Joseph 
Canada Jr. and Del. Glenn 
McClanan will discuss work 
accomplished by the 1974 
General Assembly today at 10 
a.m! at the meeting of the 
Beach Suburban Republican 
Wwnen's Club, at the Atlantic 
Permanent Savings and Loan 
Association building on 
Independence Boulevard. 
Visitors are welcome. 

CITY COUNCIL candidates 
have been invited to speak 
tmiight at the Council of Civic 
Organizations meeting at^7:30 
p.m. in the Atlantic Permanent 
Savings and Loan Associatitm 
building on Independence 
Boulevard. Visitors are 
welcome. 

THE COUNCIL of Garden 
Clubs of Virginia Beach will 
meet today at Thalia United 
Methodist Church. 221 N. Fir 
Ave., across from Willis 
Wayskie. Registration is at 9:30 
a.m. with business session at 10 
a.m. A short board meeting will 
be held before the regular 
council meeting. 

BIG BANDS are bade, says 
Princess Anne High School, 
which will have a jazz band 
concert tmight at 8 in the school 
auditorium. Performing will be 
stage bands from Princess 
Anne High School (Ronald 
Collins, director) . Keliam High 
School (Jack Sperry, director) 
and Bayside Junior High School 
(Evelyn Sperry, director). 
Tickets, available at the door, 
are $3 per family, $1.50 for 
adults and $1 for stixlents. 

■nvo OPPO.SING candidates 
for the City Council Bayside 
Borouf^ seat. Gaynette Winter 
and Dr. Clarence Holland, will 
discuss thei^ platforms 
Thursday at 8:30 pm. at the 
Lake Smith Terrace Civic 
Association meeting at 
ThorMighgood Elementary 
School on Dunstan Lane. 
Visitors are welcome. An 
informal candidate question 
and answer session and 
'business meeting, closed to the 
public, will precede the open 
meelit^ at 7:30 p.m. 



CHILDREN ages 3 to S are 
invited to hunt easter eggs 
Friday at 10 a.m. at the Bayside 
branch library. The hunt is 
sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach public library system. 

KIWANIS CLUB members of 
Norfolk-Princess Anne will 
have their annual charity ball 
Friday from 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 
a.m. at the Virginia Beach Civic 
Center (Dome), 19th Street and 
Pacific Avenue. The Leaves <rf 
Grass will provide music. 
Proceeds from the informal 
dance will be donated to the 
United Cerebral Palsy 
Foundation. The public is 
invited. Ticket donations of $6 
per couple may be made at the 
dow. 

.lOE DUNN, managing editor 
of the Virginia-Pilot, will be 
guest speaker at Friday's 
meeting of the Virginia 
Tidewater Professional Chapter 
cf Women in Communications 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Virginian- 
PiloL Ledger-Star advertising 
conference room, 150 W. 
Brambleton Ave., Norfolk. A 
business meeting will precede 
his talk at 6:30 p.m. All women 
in the communications iveli are 
invited to attend. 



p.m. at Princess Anne Park. 
Princess Anne and Landstown 
Roads. Plaques will be awarded 
iar highest-flying, largest and 
smallest kites. The contest was 
postp(Hied Cnun March 23. 

HORSEMANSHIP will be on 
display Saturday beginning at 
9:30 a.m. when a youth horse 
show is held at Princess Anne 
Park, comer Princess Anne and 
Landstown Roads, sponsored by 
local 4-H clubs. Contestants 
under 19 will compete in 26 
classes at the horse show ring. 

EASTER services Sunday at 
Old Donation Episcopal Church, 
4449 N. Witchduck Road, will 
use the historic Queen Anne 
silver, given to the church by 
the queen in 1712, for three Holy 
Communion services at 8. 9:30 
and 11 a.m. The Rev. Beverley 
D. Tucker Jr., rector, will be 
assisted by lay readers James 
D. Cummins Jr. and Dr. 
Richard K. Bolsen. Visitors are 
welcome. 

CHILDREN, their friends and 
parents are invited to Rubicon- 
DOOR's Easter Egg hunt 
Monday at 11 a.m. The event. 
sponstM^ l^ the drug abuse 
rehabilitation program of 
Norfolk, will be held at several 
locations in Norfolk. Games, 
activities and prizes will be 
included. Additional 
information may be obtained 
from Rubicon-DOOR at 622- 
3434. 



"THE SHROUD of Turin," a 
reading based on the study of 
ttie Holy Shroud, will be given 
by Lee Lively and Nofrie 
Martin Good Friday at 7:30 
p.m. at St Francis Episcopal 
Church, 509 Rosemont Road. 
Liturgy and presentation will be 
directed by Frank Collier, a 
student at Union Presbyterian 
Seminary, Richmond, The St. 
Francis adult choir, under the 
direction of Hugh Niblack. will 

provide special music. VisitortP^eS*"''"^'' ^^^ ^^^ Mittory 

Jfighivay).' Ches^peaRe. 
InstructicMiat specialist^ in the 



EDUCATORS will speak 
April 17 at the meeting of the 
Tidewater Association for 
Children with Learning 
Disabilities at Indian River 
Junior High School. 2300 



are welcome. 



FILMS for children will be 
shown Sahirday at U a.m. at 
two branch libraries. Films at 
the Virginia Beach branch are 
"The Elephant Mystery." "The 
Five-Cent Nicfcle" and "A Day 
at the Fair." The film at the 
Windsor Woods branch is 
"Rabbit Hill." 

CUB STOUTS ages 8 to 10 (rf 
the Princess Anne-Virginia 
Beach Scouting district will 
participate in a kite flying 
contest Saturday from nocm to 4 



Chesapeake public school 
system will speak. Meeting 
time is not available. 

THE TIDEWATER chap|^ 
of the Virginia Society for 
Human Life will meet April 18 
at 8 p.m. in the Building 11 
conference room of the Koger 
Executive Center. A film strip 
on Pro-Life Write Weekly Inc. 
will be shown. The public is 
invited. 

LIONS CLUB members (rf 
Aragona-Pembroke will 



formally donate special 
equipment to the hantiicapped 
Special Services Division of the 
Bayside branch library April 19 
at 1 p.m. The equipment, for 
blind- patrons, consists of a 
therm(rform machine iand an "" 
automatic braille reproducer. 
Guests invited to attend are 
Rep. G. William Whitehurst,* 
Mayor Robert B. Cromwell Jr. 
and other city (rfficials. 

THE LAMAZE method of 
natural childbirth will be shown 
in a film A[si\ 20 at 10 a.m. at 
the Vill^^. Inn Pizza Parlor, 
Janaf Shopping Plaza, Norf(ft. 

FOR THE RECORD 

NEW OFFICERS of the 
Virginia Beach Lodge No. 2268 
of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks .were 
recently installed. They are: 
exalted ruler. Fredrick H. 
Stegemann; leading knight, 
George S. Ofelt; loyal knight, 
William H. Glover; lecturing 
knight, Fred M. Lively; 
secretary, William H. Cames; 
treasurer, Bruce L. Hall; tiler, 
Patrick H. Hermesmeyer; 
trustee, John P. Beary. Newly- 
appointed officers are: 
chaplain, Charles W. Tucker; 
esquire, Michael A. 

McCartney; inner guard, 
Joseph F. Allen. 

COMMUNICATIONS was the 
theme of the month f(M"-Cub 
Scout Pack 425' s recent 
meeting. Displays on 
communications w'ore 
presented by Dens 1, 5 and 9 and 
the Webeloes. Den 5 gave a 
sketch on communicating with 
music and Den 9's sketch was 
on communicating by 
television 

. THREE BOYS gradUateti into 
Boy Scouts at the recent 
meeting of Cub Scout Pack 486. 
Gregory Moyer. itaymond Cook 
and Robert McFadden were 
presented their graduation 
certificStes and Boy Scout 
handbooks. Guest at the 
meeting was Fred Gray, 
assistant district executive (rf 
the district B(^ Scout office. 

/terns may be submimd toSmn 
Dial by mail. Please mail your not- 
ice to Sun CMd, Virginia Beach Sun 
138 Rmemwtt Road, Virpnia Beach 
Va. 23452. Deadline is noon Fri- 
day prit^ to the week of public- 
ation. 







^dh^ta 



MfailaBfliia^MM 



HHH 



wmmmm^ 



!««,-■*- 



■"?!■ 




Tha Syn-Wednesday. April 10, 1974-Pags B-3 



raises questions 










on reiigious education 



NEW. YORK - The current crisis in 
reliiiious education has raised 

- fundamental questions about the church, 

' according to a leading religious educator. 

■ "It has become a cliche to suggest that 
we are in the midst of a crisis in religious 
education." declared Charles F. Melchert, 
associate professor of educati<» at the 
Colgate Rochester Divinity School. "The 

' signs of crisis are all around." 

Melchert. writing in Religious 
Educiation. the official publication of the 
Religious Education Association of the 
United States and Canada, noted that 
Sunday school enrollments are down 
sharply, parochial schools are closing, 
many teacher-members of religious 
orders are leaving and denominational 
staffs have been sharply cut. 

Melchert finds church leaders in 
disagreement on the definition of religious 
education. One says religious education 
must involve indoctrination, while another 
declares it cannot indoctrinate. A third 



maintains that all of one's experiences are 
educational. 

ACROiiS THE nation, millions of dollars 
and billions of hours are spent every year 
planning and conducting church 
educational programs, Melchert pointed 
out, adding that there is no way to 
calculate the extent of the devotion and 
good will people put into such projects. 

He noted three ways that churches can 
be nrisled in their educational programs: 

1. They can confuse education with 
schools, whereas what goes on in schools is 
not necessarily educational. 

2. They can find it easy to think of 
education as a "diseipline," such as 
psychology or philosophy, while 
fundamentally it is merely one way of 
doing things that involve people. 

3. They can yield to a temptation to 
assume that because the church needs 
something, education can make it 
possible. 



"THE CHURrH may need to convert 
pec^le and bring them to a Christian way 
o( living," Melchert wrote in expandii^ on 
the third point, "and it has often been 
assumed that ttiis is one of the tasks of 
educatioti in the church. But the needs of 
the church do not establish the nature, 
structure and function <rf education. For 
that we need to investigate education 
itself. 

"Then we can ask, is this something the 
church has a need for or could make use 
of?' " 

Melchert has singled out six basic 
criteria for religious education: It must be 
an intentional activity. It must be (rf value 
in improving people. It involves knowledge 
and understanding, being more than 
training the acquisition of skills or 
amassing facts. It involves a long period of 
years. It is an interpersonal procedure, 
with the knowledge acquired depending on 
those who write the books and teach their 
contents. It involves the whole person and 
"is not the kind of thing one can just put 
aside when it is convenient." 



^^' ^l^r * _ /*■ 



" 1 

Annuls 
padkartc 

inchiurdt 

NQye and Ms ark saved 
all the animals, his wife 
and children— but the 
great fludde washed 
Mrs, Noye's drunken 
friends away in the 
recent presentation of 
the Chester cycle play, 
"Noye's Fludde. " at the 
Kastern Shore Chapel. 
Dr. K. David Clayton 
IMrtrayed Noye, with 
Theresa Worrall as Mrs. 
Noye. The children's 
chorus donned animal 
costumes and filled the 
ark constructed in the 
church sanctuary while 
members of'the Virginia 
Reach Civic Symphony 
stirred up a musical 
riudde. (Sun photo by 
Neal Sims) 



Ft. Story 
service set 



The 47th annual Easter Sunrise Service at Ft. 
Story will begin af 6:15 a.m. Easter Sunday at the 
Cape Henry Memorial Cross on the Army post 
grounds. 

The Rev. David Lee Henry, pastor of Bayside 
Baptist Church, will deliver the Easter message. 
The scripture reading will be by the Rev. Byron S. 
Halstead. pastor of Baylake United Methodist 
Church. 

Music during the service will be provided by the 
U.S. Army Band and the Virginia Beach Civic 
Chorus. The prelude will be performed by the Army 
element of the Armed Forces School of Music, 
followed by the processional, color guard, speakers 
and choir. » 

This year's service is sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach Chamber of Commerce. It is held each year 
at the Memorial Cross, the site of the first landing 
of English settlers in the New World. 

All residents are invited to attend. \j\ the event of 
inclement weather, the service will be canceled. 



Growing up, but not old 



Grandmother: 



wisdom in age 



A woman who has just turned 
50 has shared with me some 
very deep things about how she 
was living her life. 

Dorothy confkled that she 
found it a relief that now she 
was 50 she did not just start 
falling apart, and she found that 
there was still an opportunity 
for more growth. She spoke 
about being thankful for what 
she has learned in the last few 
years, and now she is getting 
use9 to the idea of being a 
grandmother. 

As Dorothy talked about what 
she thought being 50 would be 
like when she was younger, I 
could understand and well 
identify with the things she was 
saying. She thought she would 
be white-haired, mostly senile, 
and dressed only in gloomy 
blacks. I do not know if she is 
whitehaired. but she certainly is 



CHURCH NOTES 



Virginia Beach United 

. Methodist Church, 207 18th St., 

'^ will have two special services 

ttiis wedc observing Lent and 

Good Friday. , 

The Rev. Richard Woodward, 

pastor of the Community 
. Chapel, will be guest Lenten 

speaker today at noon in the 
. final Lenten service offered by 

the church this year. He will 

speak in the chapel. 

. Dr Harry W. Backhus HI, 
superintendent of the Norfdk 

. District of the United Methodist 
Church, will be speaker at Good 
Friday services at noon. 

Joyce Clarice has arranged 
special music for each of the 
, services. 

"•raE LAST SUPPER" will 
come to life Thursday when 
Thalia United Methodist Church 
offo^ a living presoitation of 



Leonardo da 
masterpiece. 



Vinci's 



Members of the congregation 
will enact the Last Supper in a 
pageant with each actn* in 
costume. Each of the subjects in 
da Vinci's painting will be 
portrayed. 

"The Last Sunwr" was a 
commission^ work painted by 
da Vinci to demonstrate 
Christ's relationship with 
common men. 

The work will be presented 
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia 
United Methodist, 221 N. Fir 
Ave. (across from Willis 
Wayside). 

THE CHARLES Wesley Choir 
will present Theodore Dubois' 
"The Seven Last Words of 
Christ" Thursday at 7:30 p.m. 
at Virginia Beach United 



Methodist Church, 207 18th St. 
The musical work includes 
seven separate compositions 
based on the last phrases 
spoken by Jesus before he died. 
Soloists will be Eleanor E. 
Pursell, Phyllis A. Bailey, C. 
Oral Lambert, Donald H. Seely, ' 
John J. Bailey and L. Leslie 
Wasserman. 

Joyce G. Clarke is director <rf 
the 32-person choir. Eleanor J. 
Marshall is wganist. 

AN EASTER SUNRISE 
church service will be Sunday 
at the Norw^ian Lady, 25th 
Street and Oceanfront. The 
service, scheduled to begin 
about 6: 30 a.m., is sponsored by 
Broken Needles. 

Rev. Danny Marrow, 
president and founder of Bremen 
Needles, will deliver the 
evangelistic message. 




STRONq 

chuRchES 




\ 



i;-:i\ 



HOLSTEIN 



»r- 



i 



DavUHolstmn 
Is new pastor 
attoc^chwch 

Ti^ewate- Central Church of 
the Nazarene in Virginia Beach 
tiBS a new pastor who will 
Mher hte first message Easter 

tbt Rev. David Hobtrin and 

JMl family will be weksMMd 

tei^tt aft^ Uie diurcb's mid- 

/»« m^k swvice. Cwgrqsatio* 

'^ mmbcn wiU lie^ ffll the 

lartonage pantr; by bria^ng 

^«mriw to Ae v^one ^rty. 

The Rev. H*tefai fe a native 
of W(»t Virgiiia aiKi studied at 
God's Baak &:hool, CindoMti, 
nd OUvet Naurow CoUete, 
Kui^ee, 111. He b manMI 
ud has tfene diildki9L 



A THOUGHT 

FOR 

TODAY 

APRIL 10, 1974 

By Rey. S.O. Rdta- 

iRl AiiemUy 
of God 

Easter 9Qmea Iwt onpe 
a year, but Uirough it's 
sacrifice we have good 
d>e«r. John 3 : 16 - "For God 
so kiveA Qie world, that He 
gave His onfy begotten Son, 
tiMt whouever bdieveft ia 
,Hlm thfluld not poisb, but 
have ev'erlastii« life." 



« 



BAYUKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Vi.BMcii - 4«4.2423 

Byron S. Hailstead- 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

OwA Sdlod 9:30 AJi. 
|iarii«Wflal# lliMAJI. 
VKF0R8 iOtE mUXNB. 



EMMANUEL TABERNACLE 
CHURCH-UPC 
157 Mon^OB Ave. 
block off S. LymhweR Rd.) 
Sev. HaroU Urik)a4Pwtoi 
Fhone: 340-7333 
fti^ School - 10:00 AJi. 

Wedaetd^7:30PJf. 

MUeStady 
"EvnyoM Wtlcome, Come 
Wooh^ini^ih'' 



■MPSVILLE 

BAPTIST CHURCH 
S204 htecMi Ame RomI 
Rer. CknlM H. JoMt 

8aadwSdKwl-9:45/LM. 
Woidp- 11:00 AJi. 
TMi^UiikMi-6:lSPJI. 
Bmiag Wocrii^i - 7:M PJL 
WMtaMdqr Evm^ - 7:15 PJL 
PUyw Itt^BgmiWbit Stady 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 



MI4 Patfneat Ph. 497-8703 
SHBdv SdKMi lb. • 9:45 AJL 

jMto,YiM*,AAdilt 

M9«^-«KI0PJi. 

Rat oi Iwplialiwi • 7:00 PJi. 

V^m 7:30 TM. 



JLcI's %alk 

By 
Rev. W.L Truman 



much more exciting than quiet, 
and wears anything but dark 
somber colors. Her excitement 
cfime out of the discovery that 
50 is approaching the pinnacle 
rather than the decline. 

1 REVIEWED the work done 
in this field by Eric Erickson, 
the psychologist. He verified 
what she said, that both in mind 
and in spirit many people are 
expanding, not collapsing after 
50. 

Dorothy has a strong faith, 
.and she feels vet^ much like, the 
First Psalm — her tree of Itfe is 
planted by the waters. 

After many hours with 
Dorothy, her progress of 
arriving at this stage of her life 
can be roughly outlined as 
follows. Her first step was 
accepting her own uniqueness, 



past, present, and future, and 
learning to underline her 
strengths and to be aware of her 
unique weaknesses. When she 
got over the hurdle, she was no 
longer comparing herself with 
other people or wishing to be 
someone else. 

Slll^ HAD TO find a new 
attitude toward her parents 
which she now sees as 
individuals, and finds herself 
appreciating their strengths, 
and forgiving their weaknesses. 
Then she could no longer hold 
them responsible for her life, 
and this was her next 
breakthrough. 

This allowed her to let her 
children be themselves, free to 
choose their own way of life and 
putting no entangling apron 
strings around them. 

She said she grew when she 
understood that her life was her 
responsibility and no one else's. 
She found that her life held ever 
increasing possibilities anj no 
effort to aevelop or ej^and 
herself was ever wasted. 

THEN ALMOST with tears in 
her eyes, she spelled out her 
majestic realization of the inter- 
relationship of her life with all 
of life and that she is a part of 



Need help? Phone-In TV 

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640KempivilleRd. Ph. 499-3727 

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Assembly of CJ^< 

(Conm Va. leach Blvd. 

OcemaBhrd.) 

S.Bdk(.PMtar 
428-5297 



FIRSTCMURCH 
OF CHRIST 
SCIBNTIST 
Virflinia Buch 
1341 Laikin Rd. 
Sunday 
Chwch Sarvlct IliM AM 
Sunday School 11 :M AM 
Wtdnaiday 

Testimony MNtln* •:•• 
PM 

Christian Scitntlst 

Rcatfnt Room 

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Monday thru Saturday 

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EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 

47SO Baxter Rd.-Vt. Betch 
PMtor: W. P. Gnadttaff 
Phoee: 497-4^ 

Sunday School: 9:45 A.li. 

(AiAfti) 
PtoMAhgSaviee: 11:00 AJI. 
Bviiitai fimMi^ 7:00 PJd. 

Wo4wodw7;30PJI. 
VtarwAlttloSta^ 
VaiM Yoitt AcOMm 



WCLCMffi TO WOROW 

ANDimMEnwrni 

ST. IMRK A.M.E. 

CHURCH 

■ ■■*■■ ^^d^ ^t^^^A^ 

%m rmmt m. viniini •««», v«.| 

lOt-IM 

. f !N A.M. 
■ 1l:«t A.M. 

ThwitAy, ^^rll 11th 
Miundy TliMdey 
Ser^GW - liM PJM. 
EASTER SUNDAY 
Ejiriy iMornint WorMlp 
71OOA.M. 

WMMMar ■ ':« PM. 

m t m m un ■ iiM PM. 
TM aw r rt m Prayar 



the whole and the whole is a 
part of herself. "I feel very 
much a part of God's work in 
this world, both redeeming and 
lifting both the suffering of my 
brothers and sisters and leading 
and helping as I can." 

The eminent psychologist, 
Abraham Maslow, has a school 
of thought which is dubbed 
"self-actualization." He writes 
about the need for persons who 
are mature to work continually 
on fragments of their own 
immaturity until there comes a 
point where a person can see all 
of the strands of life coming 
together. 

I felt excited as this non-gray 
souled grandmother In her own 
wisdom had touched some very 
real fibers of what life is all 
about. 1 also have a very real 
feeling that her great- 
grandchildren will say that she 
had it all together and knew 
what the score was when it 
c^e to life — namely, do not- 
grow old, but grow flp! 




Religious Page Sponsors 



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Inc. 




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504 S. Military Hwy. 

Virginia taacli, Va. 
Plion« 420 -1840 

John Dm^f iqulpmmnt 



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Phone ■ 497-3591 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonn^ Road 
Phone - 340-1161 



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OF VIRGINIA BEX^CH 



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Offices Throughout Virginia Beach 

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Phone - 497-8126 



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ViilGINIA IIACN. VA. 2)462 



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Gardenin g 

Clubs pu^ litterbin fine 



Page B4-The Sun-Wednesday, April 10, 1974 



*i 



The Council o! Garden 
Clubs of Virginia Beach has 
hit the litterlxig where it 
hurls most — in the 
pocketbook. 

The Council was in- 
strumental in last week's 
passage of an amendment to 
the city code establishing a 
$50 minimum* fine for lit- 
tering in Virginia Beach; 

The city's two anti- 
littering ordinances carried 
nvisdenieanor penalties, 
meaning a convicted lit- 
terbug could get up to a 
$1.(100 fine or 12 months in 



jail or both. 

But in reality, said 
Martha Tompkins, anti- 
litter chairwoman of the 
Council of Garden Clubs, 
convicted litterbugs were 
rarely fined by the judge. Or 
if they were fined, the 
amount was a very small 
sum. she said. 

TIIK FKOBLEIVI was that 
the ordinances carried 
maximum fines, but no 
minimum fines. 

In planning for the city's 
Clean Sweep Week, which 



ended Saturday, the Council 
of Garden Clubs in- 
vestigated the litter 
problem and found that it is, 
indeed, a problem, Ms. 
Tompkins said. 

Not helping solve that 
problem was the fact that 
many litterbugs were going 
free, with a simple judicial 
reprimand. 

The Kempsville Garden 
Club, a member of the 
Council of Garden Clubs, 



knew of the Council's 
concern and met with theif 
borough City Councilman, 
Garland isdell, to see what 
could be done, Ms. Tomp- 
kins said. 

"Mr. Isdell has been very 
cooperative in this," Ms. 
Tompkins said. "He has 
been very concerned and 
very sympathetic." 

At last week's City 
Council meeting, Mr. Isdell 
introduced the amendment 
to the litter ordinances. 




Trivia comer 

Slugs and snails are always a problem 
for gardeners. Discourage them by putting 
crushed egg shells around the garden edge. 
Or try placing a cabbage leaf upside down 
on the ground and the slugs will gather 
underneath. 



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LOST-due to "yellow anemia" 
MIRACID could have saved it! 



GARDEN PLOTS 
FOR REKT 

Hilltop Area 
(next to Zayres) 

Plots 20'x50' priced $20.00 til Jan. 1st. 

CALL 486-6546 




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TKiLAMesTAiio HOST EXPeRicmoLMwii OAK Exnm 

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Larger Sizes 
•!•• to •4»» 



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WE GUARANTEE OUR PLANTS TO LIVE! 



RID, PINK a WHITE 

DOGWOODS 



JAPANtSE KWANZAN 

FLOWERING 
CHERRIES 

S|4S0 



How to save 
pine growtli 

from motiis 



Q. What can be done to control the insect which 
kills the new growth on my pines each year? 

A. This insect is commonly referred to as Pine 
Tip Moth. The moth overwinters and on warm 
spring days the adults emerge and mate. The 
females lay eggs in the axile between needles 
and stem near the terminal bud of host trees. The 
youqg larvae bore into the base of developing 
needles and later into buds. Pine Tip Moth 
produces three to four generations per year in 
this area and damage may be severe. 

Effective control of this insect can be obtained 
by spraying with dimethoate (Cygon, DeFend, 
Pine Moth Spray). Apply the first spray in mid- 
April and repeat in early to mid-June. Spray the 
tips, buds and foliage thoroughly. 




questions & answers about lawns & gardens 



Q. What annual flowers are recommended for 
Virginia Beach? 

A. The list of annuals that do well in this area is 
extremely long. A few that did well in 1973 were 
Ageratum Blue Bird No. 2, Capsicum Varigated 
Leaf, Marigold Lulu, Petunia Calypso, Portulaca 
Pink, Zinnia Linearis and Tahoka Daisy. 



Q. Can I grow tomatoes in pots? 

A. Tomatoes can be successfully grown in pots. 
Do not use standard varieties for pot culture. 
Several varieties have been developed just for 
this purpose. Loc* for the varieties of Tiny Tim, 
Patio or any of the cherry tomatoes. 



HotHne will be ^d to answer your questions about lawns and 
gardens. Send your questions to HatUne, Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rosemont Road. Virginia Beach, Va. 2345Z 



NOW 



DORMANT OiL SPRAYS 

Can pfevent many iiuecti (mitei, scales, aphids and mealy bugs.) bom 
multiplying in the spring and wmmei of 1974. 

CALL 420-1283 NOW 

TO HAVE AZALEA, CAMELUA, ARBGRVITAE, BOXWOOD, 
JAPANESE HOLLY, PYRACANTHA, AND CHINESE HOLLY 
GRAYED WIIH DORMANT OIL. 

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420-1283 



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TREES 



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FLOWERING TREES 

Chtrry-Doffwoo^Rtd Butf 



SHADE TREES 

Whitt Birdi-Rtd Mopit, ttc. 



1^' Ligustrum^^lO ftrye 

Blooming Azaleas $1 & W 



Pansies- Candy Tuff- Creeping Phlox 

• • 
Strawberries - Blackberries • Horseradish 

• • 
ONION SETS 

Purple Wisteria - Hydrangtos 
House Plants • Honging Bosliets 




4 m|Ol 



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^ M.50 Pravidmct Rd. Ph«me 42^f8U 
"Mondav-Seturday 9 A.M.'-ft PM. 
Sunday 12:.TO-4:30 P.M. 



Strawberries: 








^ 



forgardeners 






Strawberries are the most 
widely cultivated small fruit in 
America. They are the favorite 
of many for pies, jams, jellies, 
preserves and for eating fresh. 
Being adapted to a greater 
range of soil and climate 
conditi(»is than any other fruit, 
strawberries are well suited to 
the home garden and may be 
grown successfully in every 
section d Virginia Beach. 

Strawberry varieties vary 
greatly in the adaptability to 
soil and climate conditions; 
therefore, specific varieties are 
suggested or recommended for 
production in different areas. 

In Virginia Beach, the 
following varieties are 
recommended: Early Dawn, 
Early Bell, Fairfax, Catskill, 
Pocohontas, Sure Crop, Red 
Chief, Tennessee Beauty and 
Red Star. Of these varieties, the 
variety most commonly used in 
home gardens is Pocohontas. 

ALTHOUGH strawberries 
grow best in a fertile sandy 
loam soil with a pH of 5.7 to 6.5, 
they may be successfully grown 
in any good garden soil that is 
well drained and well supplied 
with organic matter. Soil for 
strawberries should be 
thoroughly prepared for 
planting. It should be loose and 
free of lumps. 

Do not set strawberries in 
land that has recently been in 
sod. Select the cleanest area of 
the garden for setting 
strawberry plants. Plants 
should be spaced about 12 
inches apart in rows three to 
three ai^ one-half feet apart. 
Set each i^ant so that the base 
of the bud is at the sdl level. 
Spread the roots out and firm 
the soil carefully about them to 
prevent air pockets, which 
allow them to dry out. 

Cultivation for weed control 
in strawberries should begin 
soon after planting and continue 
at approximately two-week 
intervals throughout the first 




EXTENSION DIVISION 



growing season. It must be 
shallow to prevent root injury. 
Most home garden 
strawberry plantings are 
mulched. Any organic material 
free of weed seeds makes good 
mulch Hay, straw, and pine 
needles are most frequently 
used. Black plastic is frequently 
used as a mulch. It is effective 
in inhibiting weed growth and 
preventing the evaporation of 
moisture, from the soil surface. 

FKRTILIZATION has seldom 
proved beneficial to straw- 
berries on good soils well 
supplied with organic matter. 
Where soil analysis indicates a 
need, about one pound per 100 
feet rf row (rf a complete 
fertilizer, such as 10-10-10, 
should be cultivated into the soil 
before planting. 

Fertilizer should be applied in 
the fall over established 
strawberries. Do not apply 
fertilizer in the spring to picking 
beds of strawberries growing in 
heavy land, as there is danger 
(rf excess vegetative growth 
which results in reduced yield, 
increased rot, late ripening and 
power quality. 

During the first seasog, all 
flower stems on the plants should 
be removed as soon as they 
appear. This strengthei^ the 
plants and allows for earlier 
and more vigorous runner 
production. The early-formed 
plants t)ear the best fruit the 
following year. 



April showers here 



Gardeners who want to know 
what the weather Will be like for 
planting this mmth may heed 
the National Weather Service 
long range predicti(m group's 
outlook for April in Tidewater. 

April is expected to have 
temperatures near normal with 
the annual April showers 
expected to bring above-n(»rmal 
precipitation. 

A typical Tidewater Ajwil is 
usually partly cloudy with 
c(Hisiderable sunshine. Eleven 
cloudy days are forecast and 11 
rainy days. Mornings are less 
likely to have rain than 
afternoons. No matter what the 
hour, though, there is a 32 per 
cent chance of rain on any day. 

TEMPERATURES ARE on 



flie rise. There's a 50-50 chance 
of frost sometime in the early 
part of the month and a 30 per 
cent chance until the 17th. High 
temperatures should average 
between 63 to 73 degrees during 
the month. 

Winds are usually warm and' 
from the south-souUiwest about . 
12 miles per hour. And the 
humidity starts climbing this, 
month. It's usually more 
comfolable in the afternoon, 
with about 50 per cent relative 
humidity while the mornings 
average near 70 per cent 

It may even be warm enough 
for air conditioning if 
temperatures in the 80s feel 
uncomfortable, depending on 
Qie humidity. 



Garden didi news and notes 



BRITTANY POINTS Garden 
Club members judged displays 
created by membo^ of the May 
Farm Garden Club of Kingston 
during the March May Fanrn 

club meeting at the home of 
Kathy Th<mipson. 



HOUSE PLANTS and their 
care was the subject of a talk by 
Pat Singstock at the recent 
meeting (tf the Riverton Garden 
Club. CactetGirl Scout Troop 422 
gave the club two arrangements 
for patients at the Holmes 
Convalescent Home. 




^^^A^ta^ 



i^a^^dM 



IMI 



m^^fl^m !•■ mt*m ■■. ■«. iwuhii w i 



•<^MVH« <% .i«.j« •• ■ 



fr 



Fiffsr sr£P 



Drop-ouistQ get help 



By DONNA HRNDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 



Local school drop-outs who want jobs but 
have no idea how togetthem will be helped in 
a new Chamber of Commerce program callefi 
Project First Step. 

Project First Step is the brainchild of 
Frederic P. Aucamp. judge of the Juvenile 
and Domestic Relations Court. Judge 
Aucamp approached the executive board of 
the Chamber of Commerce in January to 
suggest that the Chamber start a j<* 
counseling program for juvenile offenders. 

The main thrust of the new program will be 
lo help young drop-outs learn how to find jobs, 
said P.J. O'Boyle, who heads the Project 
First Step committee. 

"We are not going to hand these kids jobs. 
The judge was very emphatic on that point," 
Mr. O'Boyle said. "We will help them learn 
how to look for jobs, but we are not givir^ 
them anything." 

MK. OBOYLK was drafted to head the 
committee by his employer. General Hospital 
of Virginia Beach Administrator Earl Willis. 
Mr. Willis is a member of the Chamber's 
executive committee. 

Mr. O'Boyle is not a Chamber member, but 
his position as personnel director for the 
hospital enables him to lend expert assistant 
to the Project First Step effort. 

The Chamber formed a working committee 
of local business people to work with the 
young drqvouts. Also on the committee are 
representatives of the Virginia Employment 
Commission, the National Alliance of 
Businessmen and juvenile probation officers. 

The committee has met twice and plans a 
"dry rim" this week with eight young people. 
The committee will be broken down into small 
groups which wUI work with groups of 
juveniles. 

ABrtUT 5« TO 60 drop-outs will be involved 
in the program at first, Mr. O'Boyle 
explained. The program may be expanded in 
the future to include more juveniles. 

The juveniles in the program are not 
considered disadvantaged, Mr. O'Boyle said. 
They are mostly 15 or 16 years of age, both 
male and female. 

Most of the females are considered 
" stahis" offenders, meaning they have 



committed no crime other than running away 
frwn home or refusing to attend schod. 

Most <tf ithe males are on probation for 
"various crimes, such as bur^ry or petit 
larceny. The majority are not drug offenders, 
he said. 

"Their main prdblem is that they just 
couldn't cope with schod." he explained. 
"These kids have no intention of going back to 
schooK lliey need jobs to keep them off the 
streets and put them into the labor maritet." 
BUT Al.T or 16-year-old girl or boy who is a 
drop-out, who may have a record and who has 
never had a steady job has so many strikes 
against him that the employment situation is 
almost hopeless, Mr. O'Boyle said. 

This is where Project First Step h<^>e8 to tie 
of help. 

"What we want to do is teach them the 
fundamentals, help them learn the ropes," he 
said. "We're going to tell them it's not going 
to be easy." 

"We want to teach them things like how to 
fill out an apfdication," Mr. O'Boyle 
continued. "We'll tell them such things as you 
don't go in to an>ly for a job barefoot and 
you don't go in and ask, 'You don't have any 
jobs, do you?'" 

. MR.O'ROYLEemphasizedthattimeisofthe 
essence for the project since multitudes of 
high school and college students will soon be 
seeking summer employment, flooding the 
local labor market with cheap, temporary 
help. 

"These kids have no access to any sort of 
counseling except what they can get from 
their probation officers," he said. "They just 
need someonf who will give them the word 
about the real world." 

Memt)ers of the working committee are 
Judge Aucamp: Mike Haynes, juvenile 
{»'obation officer; William Eagen, Innkeepers 
Association; Carl Harris, Vepco; Dave 
Hinson, Larasan Realty; Ed Hite, Sears- 
Roebuck & Co.; Jim Jordan, Virginia 
National Bank, and JackKrome, Guille Steel. 

Also, J. E. Dohner, C&P Telephone; Al 
Maihies, Chamber executive vice-president; 
Jerry Propster, Terry Corporation; Bill 
Wood. Virginia Wesleyan College; Cmdr. 
Tom Wooten, Naval Amphibious Base, Little 
Creek; Loretta Young, Virginia Employment 
Commission, and Roy Howes, National 
Alliance of Businessmen. 



The Sun-Wednexlay, Aprfl iO, 1974-1^ B-S 



Council races quiet, hot 



The Virginia Beach City 
Council race has been quiet 
«ccept for mudslinging in the 
contest for the .Lynnhaven 
Borough seat. ,, 

Candidate Ji^il^Si^in. who 
is trying to unsoit incumbent 
Vice-mayor Reid Ervln for the 
Lynnhaven seat, has charged 
the vice-mayor with conflict of 
interest and financial gain while 
on Council and with trying to 
become a new political "boas.'' 

Mr. Griffin made his charges 
at recent meetings of the 
Virginia Beach Forum and at a 
candidates program at 
Tidewater Community College. 
He challenged the annual 
financial statements filed by 
Mr. Ervin and reputed he had 
proof that the vice-mayor had 
gained financially from 
approval of Seagate €dony 
condominiums. Mr. Ervin's 
company, Reid Associates, did 
the plumbing work on the 
condominiums. 

VICK-MAYOR Ervin has 
called Mr. Griffin's allegations 
"pure lies." In a statement last 
week, Mr. Ervin told supporters 
that "my opponent has not 
taken a stand on any issue, nor 
has he offered a single 
constructive suggestion for 
improving the government of 
■this city." He said that Mr. 
Griffin has instead spent all his 
time "attempting to dredge up 
matters which he hopes will 
reflect on my integrity" and 
"his allegations, once subjected 
to the cold light of day, are 
proving to be as groundless as 
his entire campaign." Mr. 
Ervin added that Mr. Griffin 
has worked for "the only 
political boss the city has ever 
known." and is the "frequent 
campanion of other well known 
political figures who have 
openly announced that they 
are out to get Reid Ervin." 

In the Bayside race, little has 
been heard from incumbent 



Zoning changes 
denied on bay 



The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission apparently ignored 
a request from "the City 
Manager's office Tuesday in 
recommending denial of 
applications for zoning changes' 
on two pieces of property on the 
Chesapeake Bay. 

The two parcels . of , land 
originally came' before the 
commission for action in 
January. At that time, the 
,,^inatters were deferred for 90 
days because tH the moratorium 
on bayfront zoning changes 
enacted by the City Council in 
December. 

The 90-day bayfront 
moratorium was imposed to 
allow time for 'the city planning 
staff to conduct a study of the 
bayfront. That study has since 
: been shelved in favor of the city- 
wide study to determine a "plan 
for planning" for the city's 
future development. 

\TTORNRY A. J. Coffman 

Jr., represenhng two separate 

J corporations on the two items, 

• asked that action against be 

> deferred for 60 days because 

J "the city asked us to defer it." 

< He said that ownership of 

I some of the land in the two 

; parcels is questionable. The city' 

planning staff contends that the 

city owns part of the land. The 

city's Parks and Recreation 

Department said in January 

that the city's wayside park is 

located on the property. The 

city Real Estate Division was to 

investigate the ownership of the 

site. 

"I was told by the city to ask 
for deferral of ttie matter." Mr. 
Coffman told the com- 
missioners. 

lll-r SAID that George 

Hanbury. assistant city 

- managefj wanted the Items 

'; deferred ^because "there is a 

' great deal of negotiation with 



the city going on that would 
bear fruition if you (t^e 
commission) leave this matter 
alone." 

Instead of voting to defer the 
items the commission voted to 
deny the zoning changes. 

The two parcels of land 
contain^ 30.4f acres. 0ne parc*l 
owned by Cobo Corp. contains 
4.5 acres and is east of Kleen 
Street and north (rf Shore Drive 
on the Chesapeake Bay. 

The other parcel owned by 
Lake George Corp., begins 
north of Great Neck Road and is 
north of Shore Drive On the Bay. 
It contains 31.9 acres. 

TilR OWNERS requested 
changes of zoning for the two 
parcels from resort commercial 
(D-4) to resort hotel (H-2). The 
original zoning of the first 
parcel would have allowed 
construction of 176 dwelling 
units or 393 lodging units. The 
proposed zoning would have 
allowed 393 dwelling units or 786 
lodging units. 

Original zoning on the second 
parcel would have allowed 1.150 
dwelling units or 2,555 lodging 
units. The proposed zoning 
would have allowed 2,555 
dwelling units or 5.110 lodging 
units. 



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PA© POLITICAL ADVIRTIS8MENT 



VOTE REBA McCIANAN 



*■-» 



thai 7th ^ 



''Reba McClanan is one of ouf city's out- 
standing citizens. If she werj^ man, there 
is no question thit^she Woum« elected to 
Gty Council. Let's not let the fact that sh« 
is o woman stond in her woy!" 
Signtd: Richard D. LtClairt 

Hobert G. Phillips 

W. K. Umhy 

Pefer C. Winftr$ 

MtlvinM. Stay 

Om and return to: /Ar. Melvin M. Scoy 
440 Oossett Sfract 
VifflMa Pcoch, Vo. 234S2 

( ) Enclosed is my check to help with compoign expenses, 
made j)ayable to Rebo McClonon Can^poign Committee 
( ) I will help with phooe colls and/or flyer dirtribufion, 
( ) I will help at the polls on Moy 7th, Election Doy. 
'I ) f wiH hove a coffee for yOu. 
( ) RIeose send me a bumper sticker. 

( ) Other 

f r AulkiUr •! Mthln M. Uaf. Tftm$unf 
Jlefra Mtthnmt Camp^hn Citmimt 



We^ve saved 
you a place 

in The Sun 

~and here's how 
to get it: 




Wedding and engagement announce- 
ments may be suiimitted to The Sun by 
mailing announcements to "Brides." 
Announcements should be.typedr if pos- 
sible, or printed legibly. The deadline for 
receiving announcements is noon Friday 
prior to the week of publication. Pictures 
will be returned if accompanied by a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope. 



Forum 



Readers are encouraged to have their 
say in iettees to the editor. Names will 
be withheld on requnt, but please in- 
clude your name and telephone numbw 
with your letter. Of course, the letters 
are subject only to minor editing to meet 
newsiMper style and space requirements. 
To express your <^inion or just to make 
a comment, write Forum in care of Hie 
Sun. 



sun DIAL 



Mail notN:9S of club meetings and an- 
nouncements of upcoming events to 
"^n Dial." Announcements shouki be 
typed if possible, or prin^ legibly, and 
should include a daytime telephone num- 
ber if additional information is nMded. 
Notices for "Sun Dial" must be received 
by noon Friday prior to tiie we^ of 
publication. 



«"Ka!itt/un 



The Sun 

1^ Rnemont R(^ 

Virginia Beech, Va. 23452 



councilman Dr. Clarence 
Holland, but his opponent 
Gayette Winter has been 
speaking to various groups. Ms. 
Winter has commeiidcd the city 
staff for the new "{dan for 
planning," but has said that a 
"thorough study of Virtfnta 
state laws and Virginia Beach's 
existing ordinances that deal 
with wetlands, trees, nature 
trails and wildlife refuges is 
es^ntial to insure that our 
natural balances are not 
disrupted." She says that land 
owners who maintain their 
property as wildlife refuges 
shduld be given tax credit 
similar to that allpwed to 
landowners who maintain land 
for agricultural use. 

IN TilR at-iarge race, 
candidate Cecily Macdonald 
has challenged all at-large 
candidates to an open public 
debate at 8 p.m. April 21 at 
Atlantic Permanent Savings 
and Loan on Independence 
Boulevard. Citizens will be 
allowed to question the 
candidates and Ms. Macdonald 
is calling for "Cromwell and 
Malbon to come out, wherever 
you are." (Mayor Robert , 
Cromwell and Councilman 
Murray Malbon, who are 
running together in the at-large 
race, have yet to appear at 
various candidates sessions 
which have been held around 
the city.) 



Patrick Standing, also an at- 
large candidate, has accused 
the present Coupcil of 
"indifference to past planning 
efforts and failure to use plans 
they have adc^ted as policy 
guidelines for the city's actions > 
on zoning, development and 
-program decisions," Mr. 
Standing says the Council has 
"beoi so wrapped up in its not- 
so-noble pre-occupation with 
political in-fighting and 
factionalism that it has failed to 
develop clear policy guidelines l^S^ 



for the administratioa" 

At-large hop^ul Joel Smith 
says he "will do everything to 
preserve our present beaches 
and acquire new beach areas." 
He proposes Beach residents be 
given access to a beach away 
from the tourist area and users 
(rf the beach be required to 
purchase a special sticker for a 
miirimal fee of 25 cents to Si. 
The revenue, he says, could go 
toward the upkeep of the beach. 




Note About Tills Auction; Iran, the largest producer of handwoven carpets and 
rugs, has been a backward, slow-moving country for centuries. Suddenly with the 
•dvenf of Industry, oll'and free education, it zoomed to the 20th Century. 
As a result children, 75 per cent of rug weavers, are lured away from the ancient 
art of weaving. And In our opinion, in the next five yeai(s this great art will be so 
scarce and will be hard to find. European collectors and dealers are rushing to 
America and collect these carpets. We urge the residents of Virginia Beach to 
attend this fabulous auction. 

AUCTION 

of 

PERSIAN RUGS 

AND OTHilt Orlmnfal Rugs 



a 



VIRGINIA BEACH CIVIC CENTtR 

(Meeting Room) 

Virginia Beech, Va. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 13 • 2 P.M. 

V^u>ing & Inspection from 12 noon until auction 

included are: LUXURY KERAAAN, KASHAN, PALACE QOMESI, BOKMARAS, 
HUNTING CARPETS, VASE AND GARDEN OP^ »=LOWERS CARPETS, 
PRAYER RUGS, BELOUCHESTAN.SAROUKS, SILK RUGS, and many Others., 

Luxury Kerman (t^e soft wool of the chest part of the young Persian Lamb is 
used); Qume Silk (sllK obtained by cultivating the silk worm on the leaves of thn 
Mulberry tree); Tabriz (It was here that the beautiful hunting carpets were 
woven), Ardebli (Medallion & Geometric deslgns-a famous example Is the 
Ardebii carpet in the Victoria and Albert Museum In London); Prayer Rug (they 
are recognized from MihrabI). 



Auctlbnttri Prof. Obarol 



Term* I Cash or check 



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Ws ^ne for that good oU Spring 

Garden Ft^ver? Each week on The Sun's 
Gardening page, there are dps on the 
preparation of beaudfui towns and gardens. 

lyiwdmnts also disptoy in their 

advertising . . . shrubs, seeds, supplies, 
tools and services which can be helpful. 

Your garden can be as great as you 
make It.. . readTheSun's Gardening page 
each week for articles whkA cofi mtrich 
your lives and your property. 



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Easter Seals helps 

thousands of youngsters 

like him . . . 



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iV. 



A breed 
bom of 
necessity 



Born of necessity during the Vietnam conflict, 
they quickly earned the name of "River Rats of the 
Brown Water Navy" because of the nature of their 
assignments. 

They are the officers and men of Coastal River 
Squadron Two. established July 10, 1971 and given 
the responsibility of blockading Viet Cong 
movements of men and supplies. The men patrolled 
the Vietnamese coastline and rivers with high 
speed gunboats and patrol boats. Their mission also 
included the insertion and extraction of Under- 
water Demolition (IIDTT and SEAL Teams in their 
areas of clandestine operations. 

Operating today from their headquarters at 
Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base, the squar- 
dron is involved in continuous training with UDT 
and SEAL Teams, supporting the Naval Inshore 
Warfare Group in testing of new equipment and 
training Navy Reservists from Tidewater and 
piedmont Virginia. Reservists are trained in use of 
various craft in the squadron's fleet of 40 boats and 
armament on the boats. Armament training takes 
place on the weapons range at the Army's Camp 
A. P. Hill, near Fredericksburg. 

SKIPPKKEI) BY Cmdr. John G. Connelly, the 
squadron has 12 types of boats, ranging in lengths of 
25 to 165 feet capable of speeds up to 20 knots and a 
complement of 30 officers and 250 enlisted men. 

The unit's chief-of-staff, Lt. Gmdr. John 
Luksich. points out the squadron's present mission 
also includes "maintaining an expertise in river 
warfare and a squadron of boats which could be 
dispatched to combatant areas if the situation 
should arise. " 

The squadron has also been involved in training 
foreign personnel in use of the unit's boats. A 
number of these boats have been turned over to 
Malta, Cambodia and Turkey for use by those 
governments. 

The squadron had its beginning in the 1960s in 
the non-combatant role of a boat support unit. When 
their role became a combatant one, a search was 
launched for equipment suitable for the new 
responsibilities. Mr. Luksich said, "We had an 
immediate need for coastal surveillance in Viet- 
nam and had no suitable boats." 

WOODEN-HULLED BOATS were obtained 
from Norway and modified to the squadron's 
requirements. These boats, as well as American 
versions of them with aluminum hulls,, still com- 
prise the majority of the unit's fleet. Many of the 
boats are painted dark green, as opposed to the 
familiar battleship gray. This is affective in 
preventing their detection, especially at night, 
during operations. 



The vulnerability of the boats during operations 
in Vietnam was a problem. Mr. Luksich remarked 
"They became easy targets in small rivers and 
canals. Only their speed kept them from being 
destroyed." 

One unusual craft is a Swimmer Delivery 
Vehicle Tender, used to service miniature sub- 
marines of the UDT. 

As in any successful operation, there are those 
who are behind the scenes providing necessary 
support. This also applies to Coastal River 
Squadron Two, which maintains its own shop 
support unit. These men carry the responsibility of 
maintaining boats in an operational condition at all 
times and supplying personnel with the supplies 
and equipment necessary to carry out the 
squadron's assignments. 




Give generously so 
we may do more. 

March 1-Aprii14 



L 



LiCALS 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
crfcuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 5th 
day of April, 1974. 
Joseph Kent Hough, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Conda Lynn Hough, 
Defendant. 

The object of ttiis suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion as of December 
15, 1972 and lasting for a 
period of more than one year. 
And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by or 
in behalf of the complainant 
to ascertain in which county 
or corporation the defendant 
is, withoul effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: Apt. 203, 1351 Pine 
Cone Circle, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. It is ordered that 
she do appear here within 
ten (10) days 'after due 
publication hereof, and do 
whay may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy— Teste: John V. 

Fentress, Clerk 

By: Sandra Hargrove. 

Deputy Clerk. 

Boyce & Spanoulis 

105 N. Plaza Trail 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

4.10,17,J4,5-1-4T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth ot Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 5th 
day of April, 1974. 
Doris June Lovegrove, aka. 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Jackson Earl Pugh, 
Defendant. 

The oblect of this suit is to 
obtain an annulment from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds ot defendant was not 
free to marry. And an af 
(idavif having been made 
and filed that due diligence 
has been used by or on behalf 
pf the Complainant to 
„&cfirlain in what county or 




A shot ogainsl conceit 

One day the scariest thing about cancer may be the needle 
friat makes you immune to it. 

The theory: build up the body's defense to fight off a 
dise»e naturally. 

Dramatic research in this direction is going on right now. 
Scientists are working on mechanisms to make the body 
reiecf cancer. 

Ami the promise for the future is staggering. 
I WcHridn't you feel good knowing you contributed to the re- 

noMCi cofltributo. Your dollars will h^plurther a// our 
ARMrr^earch. i 

Wswsnt to wipe out cancer in your lifetime. I 

Americsa Cancer Soc^f 

TBS S»«Ct *llT»l»yTCO »Y r»i PU»mMM •! < ruiiic Mwitc 



corporation the defendant is, 
without effect, the last known 
post office address being: co 
Woodrow Pugh, 3200 
Tidewater Drive, ftorfolk. 
Va. It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste; JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Smith, Power & Owens 
1412 AAaritime Tower 
Norfolk, VA p.q. 

Apr. 10,17,24— May l, 4t 

NOTICE TO 
THE PUBLIC 

The Commission of Game 
and Inland Fisheries at a 
meeting held irf Richmond, 
VirginiaJpn AAarch 15, 1974, 
ordered the following 
proposed changes in its 
regulations pursuant to 
Sections 29-125, 29 126 and 29 
127 of the Code of Virginia. A 
public hearing for this 
purpose of adopting such 
changes will be held at 4010 
West Broad Street, Rich- 
nrwnd, Virginia, at 9:30 a.m.. 
May 3, 1974. 

CHAPTER 3. Bear. 
Amend Regulation R3-1 to 
read as follows: 

Except as oth^wise 
provided by local leaislatlon 
and with the spe:ific ex- 
ceptions provided in the 
regulations appearing in this 
chapter, it shall be lawf^il to 
hunt bear from tlie fourlfT" 

Monday in November 

through December 31, both 
dates inclusive. 
Adopt a new regulation to be 
numbered R3-2.1 a; follows: 

It shaU be unlawf /I to hunt 
bear at any timt In the 
counties of Accomack, >« 
Amelia, Appomattox, 
Brunswick, Buchanan, 
Buckingham, Campttfll, 
Caroline, Carroll, Charles 
City, Charlotte, Chesterfield, 
Clarke, Culpeper, Cum- 
berland, Dickenson, Din- 
widdle, Essex, Fairfax, 
Fauquier, Floyd, Fluvanrta, 
Fr'anklin, Frederick,; 
Gloucester, Goochland, 
Greensville, Halifax, 
Hanover, Henrico, Henry, 
JamM City, King and Queen, 
King George, King William, 
Lancaster, Lee, Loudoun, 
Louise, Lunenburg, 
Mathews, Mecklenburg, 
Middlesex, New Kent, 
Northampton, Northumb 
erland? Nottoway, Orange, 
Patrick, Pittsylvania, 
Powhatan, Prince Edwnrd, 
Prince George, Prince 
William, Richmond, 
Roanoke, Scott, Southamp- 
ton, Spotsylvania, Stafford, 
Surry, Sussex, West- 
moreland, Wise and York; 
and in the cities of Hampton 
«id Newport News; and mi 
tife Clinch /Mountain Wildlife 
Management Area In 
Russell, Smyth, Tazewell 
and Washington cotmties and 
on the Hidden Valley Wildlife 
Mansflement Area in 
Washington Cowty. 
Amend Regulation R3 5 (a) 
and (d) to read as follows: 

(a) It shall be lawful to 
hunt bear with bow and 
arrow from the second 
Satirtiy in Oct«)er throuj^ 
the Satwday prior to the* 



second AAondsy In Novem ^ 
ber, both dates inclusive. 

(d) It shall be unl««vful to 
use dogs whan hwting with 
bow and arrow from the 
-second Saturday in October 
through the Saturday prior to 
the second Monday in 
November, both dates in 
elusive. 

CHAPTER 5. Botjcat. 
Amend Regulation RS-01 to 
read as follows: 

It Shalt be lawful to hunt 
bobcat by day or night during 
the open season for hunting 
raccoon as provided for in 
.R16-1 through R16-6, in- 
clusive. 
,,. Adopt a new regulation to be 
numbered R5-02 as follows: 
It shall be lawful to trap 
,bobcai from December 1 
through the last day of 
February, both dates in- 
clusive. 

CHAPTER 6. Deer. 
Amend Regulation R6-3 (a) 
and (d) to read as follows: 
(a) It shall be lawful to 
hunt deer with bow and 
arrow from the second 
Saturday in October through 
the Saturday prior to the 
Wond AAonday in Novem 
ber, both dates inclusive, 
except where there is a 
closed general hunting 
season on deer. 

(d) It shall be unlawful to 
use dogs when hunting with 
bow and arrow from the 
second Saturday in October 
through the Saturday prior to 
the second Monday in 
November, tioth dates in 
elusive. 

Amend Regulation R6-3.1 (c) 
to read as follows: 

(c) A muzzle loading gun 
for the purpose of this 
regulation means a single 
shot weapon, forty-five 
caliber or larger, with not 
less than a twenty -eight inch 
barrel, firing a single 
projectile loaded from the 
muzzle ot the weapon and 
propelled by fifty grains of 
black powder. If cartridges, 
premeasured powder 
charges or telescopic sights 
are used, such weapon shall 
not be deemed to be a 
muzzle-loading gun. 
Amend Regulation R6-7 to 
read as follows: 

The bag limit for deer shall 
be one a day and two a 
license year, one of which 
may be a doe during the last 
twelve hunting days only. In 
the counties ot Caroline 
(except that portion of Camp 
■ A. P. Hill north of Route 301), 
Essex, Gloucester, Greens- 
ville, Isleof Wight, King and 
Queen, King George, King 
William, Lancaster, Mid- 
dlesex, Northumberland, 
Richmonfl, Surry (except on 
Hog Island Wildlife 
Management Area) and 
Westmoreland; and in the. 
city ot Suffolk (that portion of 
the city formerly Nansemond 
County west of a line 
established by Acts 1950, c. 
83, as amended by Acts 1958, 
c. 40); and on the U.S. 
Marine Corps Base, Quan 
ilco. 

Amend Regulation R6-7.3 to 
read as follows: 

The bag limit for deer shall 
be one a day, two a license 
year, one of which may be a 
doe on the last six hunting 
days only in the counties of 
Accomack (except 
Parramore Island), Amelia 
(except on Amelia Wildlife 
Management Area), 
Brunswick (except on Camp 
Pickett), BucKinghann 
^except on Buckingham- 
Appomattox State Forest and 
Lee Experimental Forest), 
Charles City, Chesterfield 
(except on Pocahontas State 
Forest and Park and 
Presquile Federal Refuge), 
Cumberland (except on 
Cumberland State Forest), 
Dinwiddie (except on Camp 
Pickett), Fluvanna (except 
on Hardware Wildtlfe 
Management Area), 
Goochland, Hanover, 
Henrico, James City, Louisa, 
New Kent, Nottoway (except 
on Camp Pickett), Powhatan 
(except on Powhatan 
Wildlife Management Area), 
Prince George, Spotsylvania, 
Stafford (except on U.S. 
Marine Corps Base, Quan- 
tlco), York (except on Camp 
Peary, Cheatham Annex and 
Naval Weapons Station) ; and 
the cities of Hampton (except 
on Langley Air Force Base), 
Newport News (except on Ft. 
Eustis) and Suffolk (ttfat 
portion of the city formerly 
Nansemond County east of a 
line established by Acts 1950, 
c. 83, as amended by Acts 
1958, c. 40). 

Amend Regulation R6-8 to 
read as follows: 

The bag limit for deer shall 
be one a day, two a license 
year, bucks only, in the 
counties of Mathews and 
Pittsylvania (east of 
Southern Railroad) and in 
the cities of Chesapeake»and 
Virginia Beach. 

CHAPTER 10. Mink. 
Amend Regulation R10-2 to 
read as follows: 

Except as otherwise 
specifically provided in the 
regulations appearing in this 
chapter, it shall t>e lawful to 
trap mink from December 1 

through the last day of 

February, both dates In 
elusive. 

Adopt a new regulation to be 
numbered RlO-3 as follows: 
It shall be lawful to trap 
mink from December 15 
through AAarc^A, both dates 
inclusive, in the counties of 
Accomack, Charles City, 
Essex, Gloucester, Isle of 
Wight, James City, King and 
Queen, King George, King 
William, Lancaster, 
Mathews, Middlesex, New 
'A Kent, Northampton, Nor- 
thumberlaTnd, Prince 
George, RIch.inond, 
Southampton, lurry, ^ 
Westmoreland and York; 
and in the citfes of 
Chesapeake, Hampton, 
Newport News, Suffolk (area 
formerly constituting 
Nansemond County), 
Virginia Beach and east of 
U.S. Route 95 in the counties 
of Caroline, Chesterfield, 
Dinwiddle, Fairfax. 
Greenjvllle, Hanover, 
Henrico, Prince William, 
Spotsylvania, Stafford and 
Sussex. 

CHAPTER 11. Muskraf. 
Amend Reg«^«tlon RIM to 
read as follo«ia: 

Except as otherwise 
specifically provid«l In the 
r^ulations af^ew-lns hi this 
chap^. It shall be lawful to 
trap moskrat from 
D«ember 1 through the last 
day of February, both dates 
ii%lusive, 

Adop* a new regulation to be 
miinb«^ Rll 1.1 as follows: 
ft sittfl be lawful to trap 
ifKiskrot from Deceml>er 15 
tltr<x«h Mwch 10, both dates 
inclusive, In tt» counties of 
Accomack, Charles City, 
EMex, GIOMcester, Isle of 
Wight, James City, Kh^ airt 



Queen, King George, King 
William, Lancaster, 
Mathews, Middlesex, New 
Kent, Northampton, 
Northumberland, Prince 
George, Richmond, 
Southampton, Surry, 
Westmoreland and York, 
and In the cities of 
Chesapeake, Hampton, 
Newport News, Suffolk 
(area formerly constituting 
Nansemond County), 
Virginia Beach and east of 
U.S. Route 95 in the 
counties of Caroline, 
Chesterfield, Dinwiddle, 
Fairfax, Greensville, 
Hanover, Henrico, Prince 
William, Spotsylvania, 
Stafford and Sussex. 

CHAPTER n.l. Nutria. 
Rll. 1-1. It shall be unlawful 
to hunt nutria with the aid of 
watercraft on Back Bay and 
its tributaries between 
October 1 and AAarch 31, both 
dales inclusive. 

CHAPTER ll Oppossum. 
Amend Regulation R12 1 to 
read as follows: 

It shall be lawful to hunt 
oppossum only during the 
open season tor hunting 
rjccooh as provided in R 16-1 
through R16 6, inclusive. 
Regulation R16-10, 
prescribing bag limit for 
hunting raccoon in national 
lorests, is hereby rescinded. 

CHAPTER 17. Squirrel. 
Adopt a new article and 
section to be numbered: 

Article 1. Gray and Red 
Squirrel. 

R 17-01. The provisions of 
this article shall apply only to 
gray and red squirrel and 
shall not be applicable to fox 
squirrel. 

Amend Regulation R17-10 (a) 
and (c) to read as follows: 
(a) It shall be lawful to 
hunt squirrel with bow and 
arrow from the second 
Saturday in October through 
the Saturday prior to the 
second Artonday in Novem- 
ber, both dates inclusive. 

(c) It'^hall be unlawful to 
use dogs when hunting with 
bow and arrow from the 
second Saturday in October 
through the Saturday prior to 
the second Monday in 
November, both dates in 
elusive. 

Adopt a new article and 
section to be numbered: 
Article 2. Fox Squirrel. 
R 17-13. Except as other 
wise specifically provided in 
the regulations appearing in 
this article, there shall be a 
continuous closed season for 
hunting fox squirrel. 

R1714. it shall be lawful to 
hunt fox squirrel from 
September 15 through 
September 30, both dates 
Inclusive, and from the 
second Monday In November 
through January 31, both 
dates inclusive, in the 
counties of Bland, Giles, 
Montgomery, Pulaski, 
Russell, Scott, Smyth, 
Tazewell, Washington and 
Wrythe. 

R17-15. It shall be lawful to 
hunt fox squirrel from 
October 1 through October 
14, both dates inclusive, and 
from the second AAonday in 
November through January 
31, both dates inclusive. In 
the counties of Alleghany, 
Augusta, Clarke, Frederick, 
Rockingham, Shenandoah 
and Warren. , 

R1716. It shall be lawful to 
hunt fox squirrel from the 
second AAonday in November 
through January 31, both 
dates inclusive, in the 
counties of Bath and 
Highland. 

R17-17. The bag limit for 
fox squirrel shall be six a day 
and seventy-five a license 
year 

R 17-18. It shall be unlawful 
to sell, buy or offer for sale 
any fox squirrel. 

CHAPTER 22. Permits. 
Adopt a new regulation to be 
numbered R22 13: 

Any persor), upon ap 
plication to a game warden 
and the presentation of a 
medical doctor's written 
statemeht that such person is 
permanently unable to walk 
or Is otherwise permanently 
physically disabled to the 
extent he or she cannot safely ^ 
hunt except from a vehicle, 
may In the discretion of such 
game warden be issued a 
permit to shoot groundhogs 
from a vehicle from May 15 
lo September 30 of any one 
calendar year. Such permit 
will be Issued on a form 
provided by the Commission, 
and will authorize shooting 
from a vehicle only on 
private property with the 
landowner's permission, and 
not less than three hundred 
feel from nor across any 
public road or highway, and 
only when the bearer is 
properly licensed to hunt. 

CHAPTER 23. Fishing 
Generally. 

Amend Regulation R22-3 to 
read as follows; 

Except as provided in this 
regulation and in R24-10.1, 
- there shall be no size limit on 
any species of fish. There 
shall, however, be a ten-Inch 
minimum size limit on 
grayling, a twenty-six inch 
minimum size limit on 
muskel lunge and northern 
pike and a twenty-Inch 
minimum size limit on 
landlocked striped bass 
(rockfish), except that In 
Gaston Reservoir to the 
mouth of Difficult Creek on 
the Roanoke (Staunton) 
River Arm and to the mouth 
of the Bannister River on the 
Dan River Arm the 
minimum size limit on 
landlocked striped bass 
(rockfish) shall be twelve 
inches. The minimum size 
limit on yellow pike perch 
(walleye) in Smith AAountaln 
and Leesville reservoirs 
shall be twenty inches. Also, 
there shall be a twelve-Inch 
minimum size limit on 
largemouth, smallmouth and 
spotted' bass in the North 
Fork of Pound Reservoir and 
in the Roanoke (Staunton) 
and Dan rivers and their 
tritwtaries downstream from 
Niagara Dam on the 
Roanoke River and the 
Brwitly Steam Plant Dam on 
the Dan River and the 
Shenandoah River including 
the North and Sooth forks 
downstream from Route 42 
bridge in Timberville on the 
North Fork and from the 
confluence of North and 
South rivers on the Sooth 
Fork below Port Republic 
and the New River from 
Claytwi Dam to the West 
Virginia txHmdw^ line, and 
in the North Anna, 
Chickahominy, Chesdin, 
Claytor, Philpott and 
Flanaghan reservoirs. It 
Mwll be unlawful to have any 
largemouth, smallmouth or 
^MrtMd bass Ims than twelve 
in^MS h length in one's 
posi^ilon while Mi any of 
the walw? mentionad In the 
pracedhig sentence. 
COMMISSION OF GAMi 



AND INLAND FISHERIES 
Or. Allan A. Hoffman, 
Chairman 

Apr. I*. It 

NOTICE TO 
TNEPUSUC 

The Commission ot Game 
and Inland Fisheries at a 
meeting held in Richmond, 
Virginia, on March 15. 1f74, 
ordered the following 
proposed changes in Its 
regulations pursuant lo 
Sections 29-125, 29 tM and 29- 
127 of the Code of Virginia. A 
public hearing for this 
purpose of adopting such 
changes will be held at 4010 
West Broad Street, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, at 9:30 a.m., 
AAay 3, 1974. 

CHAPTER 1«. Raccoon. 
Amend Regulatton R16-1 to 
read as follows: 

Except as otherwise 
specifically provided in the 
regulations appearing in this 
article and except as 
provided by local legislation, 
it shall be lawful to hunt 

raccoon in all counties east 
of the Blue Ridge 
Mountains from September 
1 through March 31, both 
dates Inclusive. Adopt a 
new regulation to be 
numbered R 16-2 as follows: 
It shall be lawful to hunt 
raccoon in the Rapidan 
Wildlife Management Area 
Irom the first AAonday in 
November through January 
5, both dates inclusive. 
COMMISSION OF GAME 
AND INLAND FISHERIES 
Dr. Allan A. Hoffman, 
Chairman 

Apr. to. It 

ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE OF 

THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 

THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH, On the 4th DAY 

OF APRIL, 1974. 

In re: 

CHANGE OF NAME OF 

LANCE WAYNE 

SCHLAMEUS 

By; ROSEMARY 

CARLISLE 

Petitioners 

To: Mr. Kermit R. 

Scttlameus 

CO Albert Einstein Medical 

Center (Soothside) 

Old York 8i Taylor Roads 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

In Chancery No. C -73, 1463 

This day came 

ROSEMARY CARLISLE, 
Petitioner, and represented 
that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
Change of Name of the 
above named infant, 
LANCE WAYNE 
SCHLAMEUS, by 
ROSEMARY CARLISLE, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that 
KERMIT R. SCHLAMEUS, 
a natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: c-o Albert 
Einstein Medical Center 
(Southside) Old York 8. 
Taylor Roads, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said KERMIT R. 
SCHLAMEUS appear 
before this Court within ten 
(10) days after publication 
of this Order and indicate 
his attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this matter. 
A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 
WILLIAM H. COLONA, JR. 

PO 

281 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 
Apr. I0,in24— May1,4t 

OROER ' 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE OF 

THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 

THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH, ON THE 4th DAY 

OF APRIL, 1974. 

In re: Adoption of Emma 

Diane Bridges & Teresa 

Ann Bridges 

By Clarence Raymond 

Kinney & Carolyn Millner 

Kinney 

Petitioners 

in Chancery No. C74-431 

To: Donald O. Bridges 

Route No. 1, Box 540 

Summervllle, South 

Carolina 

This day came Clarence 
Raymond Kenney and 
Carolyn Millner Kinney, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding Is to 
effect the adoption of the 
ebove named infant (s), 
Emma Diane Bridges & 
Teresa Ann Bridges, by 
Clarence Raymond Kinney 
and Carolyn Millner 
Kinney, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Donald 
O. Bridges, a natural 
parent of said child (ren),ls 
a non-resident of the State 
of VIrginlar, the last known 
post office address being: 
Route No. 1, BOX 540, 
Summervllle, South 
Carolina. 

It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said Donald O. 
Bridges appear before this 
court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his-her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what Is 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this matter. 
A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D.C. 
Robert L. Bohannon p.q. 
402 Plaza One 
Norfolk, VA 23510 

4-16.17,244^1,4-+ 



PUSLICNOTICE 

Notice IS hereby given 
that on Monday, April 22, 
1974. at 2 P.M. In the City 
Council Chambers of the 
Administration Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess 
Anne ^tatjpn, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia that the 
City Council of the City of 
Virginia Beech will meet In 
accordance with Section 
15.1 431, Code of Virginia, 
for the purpose of holding a 
public hearing on a 
proposed ordinance leasing 
to and granting perAilsilon 
to Mortgage Invwtors of 
Washington, Inc., (Ocean 
Condominium Corp.) 
permission to construct, 
opwate a«d malntaki a 
bridge across Atlantic 
Avenue, just North of 40th 
Street in the City of Virginia 
■each" under certain 
condltlwis. 

Any persons affectad 
jnay appear and preswit 
Ifiair views regarding this 
mattar and may register at 
1 P.M. April 23, 1974 in the 



City Cmincll Chambers at 
the City Clerk's desk. 

All interesNd parsons are 
Invited to attend. Copies of 
the proposed ordinance 
may be examined In the 
City Manager's Office, 
Admlnistratton Building, 
Municipal Center, Virginia 
■••ch, Virginia. 

Apr. 10, It 

CammemMalth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 2nd 
day of April, 1974. 
Lawrence Val DeSpain, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Linda Kaye DeSpain, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro, to be later merged 
into a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of willful desertion. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or in behalf of the 

Somplainant to ascertain in 
fhlch county or 

corporation the defendant 
Is without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 5745 University 
Place, Apt. 102, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, It Is 
ordered that he do apear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do ^hat may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Branch H. Daniels 
281 Independence 
Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, ^ Virginia 
Apr. 18,17,24— May 1, 4t 

VIHGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 3rd DAY OF APRIL, 
1974. 

In Chancery 
No. C 74-412 

TERRAPIN HILL 

INVESTMENT 

CORPORATION, a Virginia 

corporation. Complainant 

vs 

FRANKLIN LEE 

PENNINGTON 

and ' 

HENRIETTA GARRETT 

PENNINGTON 

and 

The surviving spouse and- 

or spouses of the defendants 

Franklin Lee Pennington 

and Henrietta Garrett 

Pennington, if they are 

deceased, and the heirs, 

devisees and successors In 

title of said defendants and 

all of the heirs, devisees 

and successors in title of D. 

Stormont, if any there be, 

who have not .conveyed 

their interest in the 

property mentioned in this 

suit, all of whom are made 

parties defendant by the 

general description of 

"Parties Unknown", 

Defendants 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobject Of this suit is to 
(|uiet title to real property 
located in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
which the complainant has 
purchased from the heirs of 
D. Stormont. 

And an Affidavit having 
been made that the 
defehdants, Frefiklln Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Pennington (If 
living) are not residents of 
the State of Virginia and 
their last known address Is 
Franklin lee Pennington 
and Henrietta Garrett 
Pennington Silver 
Springs, Maryland and 
said affidavit further 
setting forth that there are 
or may be "Parties 
Unknown" and that such 
have been loined in the Bill 
of Complaint and that said 
"Partlfs Unknown", if any, 
consist of the heirs, 
devisees and successors In 
title of Franklin Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Pennington (if one 
or both are deceased) and 
the heirs and devisees and 
successors in title of 0. 
Stormont, who are not 
listed in the List of Heirs for 
D. Stormont In Will Book 7 
at page 83 of the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of VIrglhIa 
Beach, Virginia (If any 
there be) ; 

It is ORDERED that the 
defendants Franklin Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Pennington who 
are not residents of the 
State of Virginia and the 
persons made defendants 
by the general description 
of "Parties Unknown" do 
appear here within ten days 
after due publication of this 
Order and do what is 
necessary to protect their 
Interest. 

It Is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published 
once a week for four 
successive weeks In the 
Virginia Beach Sun. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

Frank E. Butler, III, 

Attorney for the 

Complainant 

4336 Va. Beach Blvd. 

Va. Beach, va. 

4-10,17,24,5-1-41 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE Mh DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 

In Chancery 

No C-74 425 
in re: Adoption of Tracy 
Lee Evans 

By: Trusste Dellette 
Rogers, Jr. and Suzanne 
Rebecca Jones Evans 
Rogers, Petitioners 
To: Lucian Telle Evans 
2717 Byweod Avenue 
Chesapeake, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Trussle 
Oellette Rogers, Jr. and 
Suzanne Rebecca Jones 
Evans Rogers, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
object of this proc^lng is 
to aiftct the adoption of the 
aftave named infant, Tracy 
Lee Evans, by Trussie 
Dellette R^ers, Jr. and 
•Suzanne Rebecca Jones 
Evans Rog«-s, husband and 



wife, and affidavit havllng 
been made and filed that 
Lucian Telle Evans, a 
natural parent of said child. 
Is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 2717 Bywood 
Avenue, Chesapeake, 
Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Lucian Telle 
Evans appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Oraer and Indicate his-her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D.C. 

Bashara li Hubbard 

Board of Trade. BIdg. 

Norfolk, VA 

4 10,17,24,5-1-41 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 1st DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 

In Chancery 

No. C74-413 
In i:e: Adoption of Daniel 
Scott Merchant 
By; Samuel Clair Button & 
Karen Jean Button, 
Petitioners 

To: Steven I Kacvlnsky 
Route NO. 3 
Ashland, Wisconsin 54806 

ORDER 

Thisday came Samuel Clair 
Button and Karen Jean 
Button, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of 
this proceeding jis to effect 
the adoption of* the above 
named infant, Daniel Scott 
AAerchant, by Samuel Clair 
Button and Karen Jean 
Button, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having Ijeen 
made and filed that Steven J. 
Kacvlnsky, a natural parent 
of saici child, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: Route 
No. 3, Ashland, Wisconsin 
54806. 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said sfeven J. Kacvlnsky 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order and 
Indicate his attitude toward 
the proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D.C. 

Herbert & Bohannon 
Plaza One 
Norfolk, VA 
4-3,10,17,}4-4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 1st 
day of April, ,1974. 
Mary Wade Hosley, Plaintiff, 
against 
Alfred O. Hosley, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this Suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
Of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 161 North Arlingron 
Avenue, Apartment 29, East 
Orange, New Jersey 0701S. 

If is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk 

Owen, Guy, Rhodes 8, Betz 
515 Pembroke One 
Virginia Beach, VA 

4-3,10,17,24-41 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Board 
of Zoning Appeals will 
conduct a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, April 16, 1974, at 
5:00 P.M. in the Building 
Inspector's Office, City Hall, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda. 

1. Hado Development 
Corporation requests a 
variance of 15 feet to a 20 foot 
setback on both sides of a 
proposed 50 foot right of way 
instead of 35 feet as required 
of Lot 36, Oceana Gardens, 
Virginia Beach Boulevard 
(a^proifimately 404 feet east 
of Gary Street), Lynnhaven 
Bormjgh. 

2. Dr. E. H. Weitzen by 
Lindal Cedar Homes 
requests a variance of R feet 
to a 30 foot front yard settjack 
instead of 50 feet as required 
of Lot 20, Block D, Section 3, 
Sandbrldge, 3676 Sandfiddler 

.i^jj^oad. Pungo Borough. 

3. L. D. Finley, Jr.by Wylle 
R. Cooke, Jr. requests a 
variance of 11 feet to a 9 foot 
front yard setback instead of 
20fMt as required of Lots VA 
through 270, North Hollies, 
west end off 15 foot lane 
between 49th Street and S8th 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 



W. L. Towers 
Secretary 



4r 3,10-21 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the AdmlMstratlon 
Building. City Hall. 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, April 22, 1*74, 
at 2:00 P.M. at which time 
ttie following application 
■will be heard: 

CHANGE OF 20NING 
DISTRICT CLASSIF- 
ICATIONS: 

KEMPSVILE BOROUGH 

1. Petition by r^olwtten 
of the Council of the City Of 
Virginia Beach for a 
CHANGE OF ZONJNG 
DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FI^TION from O. 
4 ^Ica District to S*t 






^4* 



^^k^brik 



-» ii» aini^^^^^K IU.UI1 lU-lli-l, - JM'"- J*^lWW'IWHIP«W&,«^J,*i«tUl.JA.«W».«,-l*.H 



,,*. -r,v,N^^,m4 ••.•m.m.^mfi^'mvj^'w 



The Sun-Wednesday, April 10, 1974-l^gt B-7 




f**^ 1 



Business - Residential Dis- 
Af ict on tertain property be- 
ginning at a point MS feet 
North of Narragansett 
Drive, running a distance of 
530.03 feet along ttie East 
side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 30S.0t 
feet along the Northern 
property fine, running a 
distance of 400.60 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 
233 feet at^ng the Southern 
property Mne^^vSaiiJ parcel 
* ' contains 2.465 acres. 
(Pocahontas Village Area). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOPOUGH. 

BAVWpe BOROUGH 

2. Petition by Resolution 
of the'COOrtcW of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRldT CLASSI- 
FICATfON from H- 

1 Hotel District to B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of 
Shore Drive, beginning at a 
point 300 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 240 feet more or 
less iilong the Eastern 
property lines, running a 
distance df 150 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 240 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.83 acre more or 
less. (Lake Shores-Little 
Creek Amphibious Base 
Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition by Resolution 
of the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a 
CHANfeE OF ZONING 
DISTR ICT CLASSI- 
FICATION * from B- 

2 Community Busir ss 
Distrlci to HI HOiel 
District on certain property 
located on ihe South side of 
Shore Drive, beginning at a 
point 450, feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of ISO feet more or 
less along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 260 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 150 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 267.34 feet more 
or less along the Western 
property, line. Said parcel 
contains 0.91 acre more or 
less. (Lake Shores-Little 
Creek Amphibious Base 
Are%.i., BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

4. Petition by Resolution 
of the Council of the City of 
Virginis^ Beach for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from R- 

3 Residential District to B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of 
Shore Drive, beginning at a 
point 730 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 865 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property , line^«f wtjjqii, 50 
feet more or^ less is the 
South side of Shore Drive, 
running .a distance of 370 
feet more or less along the 

rfi Western property line, 
running a distance of 785 
feet more or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 395 
feet njore or less along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 0.93 acre 
more or less. (Lake Shores- 
Little Creek Amphibious 
Base Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 



5. Petition of Elizabeth 
Williams Everett by 
George Darden, Attorney, 
fora CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSI 
FICATION from R- 
4 Residential District to A-2 
Apartment District On 
certain property beginning 
at a point 632.61 feet West of 
Birdneck Road and 187 feet 
East of AAockingburd Drive 
and 50 fetet North of 
Waterfront Drive, running 
a distance of 110 feet along 
the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 372.16 
feet along the Eastern 
property' line, running a 
distance' of 110 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and rutmlng a distance of 
365 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1 acre more or 
less, t Birdneck Acres- 
Watergate Apartments 
Are?). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

6. Petition bf C. Ray 
Scroggs, Delma W. 
Seroggs, Ronald D. 
AAorrlson and Anna J. 
Morrison fdr a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICi^TION from B- 
2 Community Business 
District to 1-1 Light 
lndi«rt^»r District on 
certain property beginning 
at a polri4 287.05 feet East of 
Mutton Lane and 212 feet 
North jof Virginia Beach 
fioulevard, running a 
distance of 481.66 feet along 
the Western property line to 
Oconee Avenue, running a 
distance of 234.78 feet along 
the South side of Oconee 
Avenue, Amning a distance 
of 412.54 feet along the 
Eastern property nne. Said 
parcel contans 2.309 acres 
and Is known as a portion of 
Site 9, Plat of Oconee Park, 

■(Ocoii¥'e Pafk-,London 
Bridge Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 



Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVBW BOROUGH 

8. Application of D 
Si M Marina for a 
CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT to operate a 
marina and related 
facilities on certain 
property located West of 
the intersection of 
LynnHaven Avenue and 
Vista Circle, running a 
distance of 531 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 189.68 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 430 
feet more.or less along the 
Soutf>ern property line and 
running a distance of 175 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel Is known as Lots 1 
through 8 inclusive. Block 
22, Plat of Lynnhaven 
Shore, and contains 2 acres 
more or less. (Lesner 
Bridge Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENT: 



COHDITIONAL USE 
PERMITS: 

PR IN CESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

7. Application of James 
G. and Marllou Kollar for a 
CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT to operate an 
animal hospital and clinic 
on certain pr^erty located 
on the No rt h side «> Heltend 
. . Road beginning at a point 
•* S70g#eet more or less North 
of Princess Road, running a 
distance of 109.74 feet along 
the Norfti side of Holland 
fload, rufwing a distance of 
1237.87 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 334.61 
Met along the Northeni 
property Hne and running a 
distance of 957.64 feet along 
«»e #««t«ti pr^erfy line. 
SaM pwe9^ ewifelM 4.7 
acrw. (Ketlam High School 



this Order be published in 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper having a 
general circulation In 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
once a week for two 
consecutive weeks. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the Clerk of this Court 
0ost or cause to be posted a 
true copy of this Order on 
the front door of the 
courthouse or at the usual 
posting place for legal 
notices within ten (10) days 
after the entry of this 
Order. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the Clerk of this Court 
shall mail a copy of the 
notice by publication 
referred to In S25-46.10 of 
the Code of Virginia to any 
owner who cannot be 
personally served but 
whose place of residence is 
then known; and the Clerk 
shall thereafter certify to 
this Court that said notices 
have been mailed, as 
required by law. 

I ask for this: 
Joseph A. Gawrys 
Counsel fw Petitioner 

4-3, 10, 2T 



PlannK*"comW,i*ssion '*J>f|JO"NV. FENTRESS, CLERK 

the City of Virginia Beach Dori s S. Hale, D.c. 

the City of Virginia mmmmmi^mi^mmmmmm^ 

Beach to amend the 

Comprehensive Zoning 

Apricultural District, 

Section 401 (c) Conditional 

uses and structures, to 

include "Lodges for 

fraternal organizations". 



to effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Carl 
Eugene Murray, by Russell 
Alan Elder and Edith Marie 
Wood Elder, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Roy David Murray, Jr., a 
natural parent of said child, 
whereabouts Is unknown, 
and that due diligence has 
been used by or In behalf 9f 
said petitioners to ascertain 
in which county or 
corporation the said natural 
parent is, without effect, 
the last known post office 
address being 723 Redgate 
Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 
It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Roy David 
Murray, Jr. appear before 
this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of 
this Order and Indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what Is 
necessarw to protect his 
interest m this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 

JANET B. BURT, 
Attorney for the Petitioners 
1369 Laskin Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23451 7 

4<3,10,17,24-4t 



Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 



4-3, 10, 2T 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BfeACH on the 
261h day of March, 1974 
COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 



Petitioner, 
vs. • 

TRUSTEES 
METHODIST 



OF THE 
EPISCOPAL 



CHURCH - SOUTH, 

and 

THE VIRGINIA ANNUAL 

CONFERENCE OF THE 

UNITED METHODIST 

CHURCH, 

AND 

TO WHOM IT MAY 

CONCERN; 

LAW NO. 
LU9A 

and all persons and classes 
of persons, (their heirs, 
devisees, etc.) whether 
their names are known or 
unknown, owning or having 
an interest therein In the 
lands or possibly owning or 
having some right, title, 
estate, or claim in or to thf 
land or any part thereof, or 
to the proceeds arising 
under the condemnation of 
the hereinafter described 
lands, and all other persons 
whomsoever, whose 
property or properties will 
or might be damaged by 
the taking of the herein 
described lands whose 
names are unknown, and 
who are proceeded against 
by the general description 
of "Unknown Owners", and 
0.916 acres, more or less, of 
land in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 
Defendants. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

in this suit. Petitioner 
seeks to acquire, by 
condemnation, for its uses, 
and for use as a public park 
and for public park 
purposes, a fee slniple title 
to one parcel consisting of 
0.916 acres of land, more or 
less, situated \f\ the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
and described as follows: 



PARCEL 120 

All that certain piece or 
parcel of land, plus all 
buildings. Improvements, 
appurtenances and riparian 
rights thereunto 
appertaining, situated, 
lying and being In Pungo 
Borough, City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and 
designated as Parcel 120 on 
a certain plat entitled 
"Sheet Five Survey 
Showing Certain Properties 
Lying South of Frank 
Batten Property for the 
Department of 
Conservation and 
Economic Development, 
Division of Parks - Ben H. 
Bolen, Commissioner 
Pungo Borough ■ Virginia 
Beach, Virginia Scale: 1" 
equals 200 ' March, 1972 
Marsh and Basgler 
Consulting Engineers - 
Surveyors, 101 N. Plaza 
Trail, In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circui* ""ourt of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, In Map Book 94 at 
Page 47, reference to said 
plat being made for a more 
particular description of 
the property referred to 
herein; said property 
containing 0.916 acres, 
more or less. 

And It appearing by 
affidavit filed according to 
law.c,4hat the following 
owner cannot be personally 
served because after 
diligent Inquiry within this 
State his place of residence 
cannot be ascertained, or, if 
ascertained, he Is not within 
this State: 

TRUSTEES of the 

METHODIST.EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH -SOUTH 

And it appearing from the 
Petition filed herein that 
there are or may be persons 
interested In the subject 
matter of this suit whose 
names are unknown; and 
whereas said Petition 
makes such persons 
defendants by the general 
description of "Unknown 
Owners;" and an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that such parties mr* 
unknown. 

It is ORDERED that the 
aforesaid owners and 
"Unknown Owners" as well 
as all persons and classes of 
persons owning or claiming 
any right, title, estate w 
interest m or to such lands 
«• any part of same, or In 
the proceeds arising upon a 
condemnation thereof, do 
appear within ten (10) days 
after the publication of 
thels Order m the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
ei the City of Virginia 
Beach and do what Is 
necessary to protect tfieir 
Interests, 

It Is further ORDERED 
that the faregolng portion of 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
• CITY OF A 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

The following abandoned 
vehicles were removed 
from the streets of the City 
of Virginia Beach: 

1960, Brown Chevrolet 
Station Wagon, 
Identification Number 
Riemoved. 

1963, White Rambler 
Station Wagon, 
Identification Number 
Removed. 

These vehicles have been 
removed to Wilson's Auto 
Service, 635 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 23451. The owner 
or any person having 
security interest may claim 
this vehicle within three (3) 
weeks of the date of this 
notice by paying ail towing, 
preservation, and storage 
charges. Failure by the 
owner or persons having 
security interest to exercise 
their right to reclaim the 
vehicle within the time 
provided shall be deemed a 
waiver and shall be 
construed as consent to the 
sale of the abandoned 
motor vehicle at a public 
auction. 

W. W. Davis, Colonel 
Chief of Police 

H. C. Terry, Captain 
Commanding Officer 
Traffic Bureau 
4-3-1t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on ths 
28th day of March, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Alberta Billups Boyd, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Dallas Boyd, 

Defendant. 

Theoblect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of two year separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or in behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain in 
which county or corporation 
the defendant is without 
effect, he last kno\k^n post 
office address being: 5304 
Pandora Avenue, Virgnla 
Beach, Virginia 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V, Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Tidewater Legal Aid 

Society 

700 Duke Street 

Norfolk, Virginia 

4-3, 10, 17, 24, 4T 

Commonwealth of virolnla, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 27th 
day of March, 1974. 

ORDER OF ' 
PUBLICATION 

Willia Earl Gray, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Phyllis Jean Sadler Gray, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed. that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
409 Oak Street, Roanoke 
Rapids, North Carolina 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary h) protect her 
interest In this suit. 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
28th day of March, 1974. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Elaine Robinson Harper, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

IVtedford Harper, 

Defendant. 

Theobjectof thissultlsto 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of Two Year 
Separation. 

An an affidavit havihq 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: 1805 
Willlowbrldge Road, 
Apartment 311, Jolief 
Illinois 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D. C. 



FENTRESS: 



jBhn 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 



Tidewater 
700 Duke St. 
Norfolk, VA 



Legal Aid 



4-3, 10, 17,24, 4T 



Gerald J; Burlage 
2410 E. Little Creek Rd. 
Norfolk, VA 

4-3, 10, 17, 24, 4T 

VIRGINIA; IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 2»th OF 
March 1974. 

INCHANCERY 
NO. C-74-386 

In re: Ajjoption of Carl 

Eugeiw Murray 

By: Russell Alan Elder 8. 

Edith Marie Wood Elder, 

Petitioners 

To; Roy David Murray, Jr. 

723 Redgate Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Russell 
Alan Eld«- and Edith Marie 
wood EWer, Petitioners, 
and re^esented that the 
object of this proceeding Is 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Ciurcuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 28th day of March, 1974. 

OROEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Grace Lambe MIchels, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Jeffrey Wood Michels 

Defendant. 

Theobjectof thissultlsto 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to'be later merged 
into a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or on behalf of the 
plaintiff to ascertain in 
which county or 

corporation the defendant 
is without effect; the last 
known post office address 
being: 4410 Holly Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va 23451 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication , 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Murphy, Bennett & 

Basnight 

3330 Pacific Ave. 

Virginia Beach, VA 

4-3, 10, 17, 24, 4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
29th day of March, 1974. 
Genevieve H. Furst, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Maynard Joseph Furst, 
Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobfect of this suit IS to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

' And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: c- 
o Kay Carment, Quarters 
F. Berry Dr., Mt. View, 
Calif. 94940. 

, It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: SANDRA HARGROVE 

D. Clerk. 

Grover C. Wright, Jr. 
3330 Pacific Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

4-3.10.17.24.4t 



And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
. 711 Baker Street, Lansing, 
michlgan. 

It ts ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do witat may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest tn this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Tidewater Legal Aid 
700 Duke St. 
Norfolk, VA. 

4-3. 10, 17, 24, 4T 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 
Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Baach on ttie 22nd 
day of AAarch, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

OvrtUi Franklin Wilkinson, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Delia Agullar Wilkinson, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Tucson, Arizona. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress; Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, b. Clerk. 

Henry L. Sadler, III 

210 Atlantic Nationat Bank 

BIdg. 

Norfolk, VA 

3,27,4-3,10,17-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 19th 
day of March, 1974. 
Llnwood Meivin Gurganus, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Tassie May Gurgtnus, 
Defendant 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of the parties having lived 
separate and apart for moris 
than two (2) years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by or 
inbehalf of the complainant 
to ascertain in what county 
or corporation the defendant 
is without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: Portsmouth, Virginia 

It is ordered that she do 
appear t-ere within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

James & Consolvo 3221 
Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

327,4-3,10,17— «t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 20th 
day of March, 1974 
Barbara Clyde Garrlngton 
Talbert, PlalntlH 
against 

Louis Herman Talbert, Jr., 
Defendant 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is to 
ct>tain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of continuous separation for 
more than two years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Louis Herman 
Talbert, Jr., c-o Walter J. 
Ballesteros, 316 Main Street, 
Reglsterstown, Maryland 
21136 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove, D. 
Clerk 

Fine, Fine, Legum & Fine 720 
Law BIdg. Norfojk, Va. 

3.2f^,10.l7^ 



m^i^ 



Commonwealth ^ Virginia, 
In the Clwk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
28th day of March, 1974. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

NM^ette Fat Allen Reedy, 

Plaintiff, 

gainst 

Richard Allen ReMy, 

Defendant. 

. Theoblect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of cruelty 
tantamount to desertton. 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 20th 
day of March, 1974 
Sidney C. White, Plaintiff, 
against 

Barbara S. Whlte,\ Defendant 

OUDBROF 

PUBLICATION 

The ebiect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later nwged Into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertton. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that th» 
defendant is not a resWen* of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known. poat office ad*«s 
beir«: General Delivery, 
Ch^Mnanville. West Virginia 
2S00 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due puWIcatlon 
hereof, and do what may be 
neca»ary to protect tier 
- mteivst In this suit. 
A copy— T«te: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: SwKft-a Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Basiwa & Hubbard Bowdof 
Tra<» BH^. f«>rfolk, VA. 

147/«.|,18.1T>« 

OOT M i MBwaa lth of VirgMto, 
Ni»aClark10Hfc»o»«« 
(^eult Cdwt of *e CH2« 
Vir^nta Baart on the HBd 
day 01 Mwdi, W* ^, ^ 
Sandra J. Strlcklairt, 
Plaintiff, 

jicWe Lee Strickland. 

it 



ORDEROF 

PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
detendant, upon Itie grounds 
of desertton. / 

And an affidavit havlhg 
been made and filed that itte 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
■being; 3S0-a8-9S«9 XO's DIv 
MAA USS AMERICA CVA 66 
FPO New York, NY. 0MO1 
' It is ordered that l>e do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do,wt»at may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy-T«Sfe: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
-ay; Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Stuart R. Sadler 1600 E. 
Little Creek Rd. Norfolk, VA 
23518 

3-27,4-3, 10, 17.41 

Comnranwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 22nd 
day ot March, 1974 
Ralph Willis Jefferson, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Evelyn Cleopatra Jefferson, 
Defendant 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonli from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of, two year separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 232 N. 19th Street, E. 
Orange, New Jersey 07017 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy-Test: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Murphy, Bennett 8i Basnight 
3330 Pacific Ave. Virginia 
Beach, VA 

3-37,4-3,10.17,41 

VirglnTa; 

IN THE CLERK'S 

OFFICE OF THE 

CIRCUITCOURTOF 

THECITYOF 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

on the 21 Day 

ot March, 1974 

STATE HIGHWAY COM 

MISSIONER OF VIRGINIA, 
Petitioner, 

vs. 

GLADYS BROWN, 

4776 Bonney Road, 

Virginia Beach, Virginia; 

WILLIAM LEE BROWN, 

JR., • 

3134 Fairview Avenue, 

Chesapeake, Virginia; 

ROBERT C. BROWN, 

2324 Burger Street, 

Norfolk, Virginia; 

JESSE B. BROWN, 

18216 143rd Street,' 

Springfield Garden, 

Long Island, New York; 

SYLVIA B. LAWRENCE, 

1258 Strand Street, 

Norfolk, Virginia; 

EILEEN M. BROWN, 

4776 Bonney Road, 

Virginia Beach, Virginia; 

PERCELL BROWN, 

2847 Elgin Avenue, 

Baltimore, Maryland; 

JEFFREY BROWN, a 

minor, 

MILTON BROWN, a minor, 

DONNELL BROWN, a 

minor, 

YVETTE L. BROWN, a 

minor, 

TONY BROWN, a minor, 

BETTY JEAN BROWN, a 

minor. 

Serve: 

Gerald J. Burlage, 

Guardian ad Litem, 

Plaza One Building, 

Norfolk, Virginia; 

and 

0.254 Acre of Land, near 

Powell's Corner, Virginia 

Beach, Virginia, 

Defendants. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

In this proceeding the 
Petitioner seeks to acquire 
by condemnation the fee 
simple title to a certain 
parcel of land containing 
0.2S4 acre^ and known as 4776 
Bonney Road, Virginia 
Beach, Vtrginta, which 
property is to be used for the 
improvement of a section of 
the Independence Boulevard 
interchange on the Norfolk- 
Virginia Beach Expressway 
(State Highway Route No. 
44), the nature of such Im- 
provement being more 
particularly described In the 
petition and exhibits at- 
tached thereto on file In the 
office of the clerk of this 
court, to which reference Is 
twreby made for a full and 
accurate description thereof; 
and for the appointment of 
commissioners to ascertain 
just compensation to the 
owners of any estate or In- 
teatst in the property to be 
taken or affected as a result 
of the taking and use thereof 
by the petittoner. 

For such purposes, the 
petitioner will apply to the 
court, sitting at Princess 
Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 16th 
day of Airll, 1974 at 9:30 
o'clock a.m.. or as soon 
thweafter as counsel may t>e 
heard, h]g a wli %p polntment of 
a>mmlss»Mrs to ascertain 
just compensation as 
aforesaid, and to obtain a 
date for the trial of the issue 
of just compensatkxi. 

And it appearing by af- 
fidavit filed according to law 
that the following owners are 
not residents of the State of 
Virginia: Jesse B. Brown l«2 
16 14*^ Street, ^jrlngfleW 
Garden, Long island. New 
York 11101, end Percetl 
Brown, 2847 Elgin Avenue, 
Baltin^ore, Atoryland 21214; 
It Is ORDERED that tfie 
aforesaid owners do appaw 
within ten (10) days after due 
puWicatlon of this order in 
Ihe Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and do what is nec^sary to 
protect their interest; and It 
I ts FURTHER ORDERED 
that w any of the above 
Nomod^ own«^ wishes to 
Msart any objection or 
dtfeim Ni the taking w 
(temaghm of his prt^jerty or 
to the i*lsdlcttoi « the cow^ 
to hear the case and ta 
pr oce«l with the ap 
pukitinent of colnmlwlowari 
heU^I fltafiM answ er and 



grounds of defense 
rtesionatinq the property 
In which he claims h» be In- 
terested, the groui'ls of any 
objectton or d^eit^ to the 
taking or damaging of his 
property or to the jurisdlc 
tion of the courl to hear the 
case and to proceed with the 
appointment of com- 
misstoners for the deter^ 
mination of just com- 
pensation. 

Should any such owner fall 
to file his answer and 
grounds of defense as 
hereinabove provided, such 
lailure shall not preclude the 
owner from appearing on the 
date set for the appointment 
of commissioners nor from 
presenting evidence as to 
valuation and damage nor 
from sharing in the award of 
justcompensation according 
to his interest therein or 
otherwise protecting his 
rights, but such (allure shall 
preclude such owner from 
other defense by way of pleas 
in bar, abatement or 
ptherwise. 

KELLAM, PICKRELL 8i 
LAWLER.p.q. 
(James M. Pickrell) 
1020 First 8i Merchants Bank 
Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

3-27.4-3,10.17,41 
A Copy Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By Gladys J. Conbag, D.C. 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON THE 
21ST DAY OF MARCH, 1974 
In Chancery 
No. C 74 213 
FRANK E. BUTLER, III, 
Executor, etc.. Complainant 
vs 

FRANCES ENDES EBELT, 
ET ALS, Defendants 
ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobjectof this suit is to 
determine "the manner ot 
distribution of the probate 
estate of Rosalind Russell 
Walton, deceased. 

And an Affidavit having 
been made that Frances 
Endes Ebelt, 261 Andover, S. 
E., Kentwood, Michigan, 
Martha Peters, 10440 
Poderosa, El Paso, Texas, 
Dorothy Caldwell Palumbo, 
7401 Shore Road, Apt. 1 C, 
Brooklyn, New' York and 
Violet Caldwell Wolfe, Route 
2, Box 209, Darlington, 
Maryland are not residents 
ot this State (Virginia) and 
the affidavit further stating 
that there are or may be 
persons interested In the 
Estate of Rosalind Russell 
Walton whose names are 
unknown and said persons 
having been joined in this 
cause as "Parties 
Unknown". 

II is ORDERED that the 
defendants Frances Endes 
Ebelt, Martha Peters, 
Dorothy Caldwell Palumbo, 
and Violet Caldwell Wolfe 
who are not residents of the 
State of Virginia and the 
persons made defendant by 
the general description of- 
"Parties Unknown" do 
appear here within ten days 
after due publication of this 
Order and do what Is 
necessary to protect their 
interests. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published once 
a weeK tor tour successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun. 

A Copy Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

I ASK FOR THIS:Frank E. 
Butler, ill 

327,4-3,10,17,41 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 13th 
day of March, 1974. 

OROEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Barbara A. Hines, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Ralph Hines, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of separation for more than 
two years, to wit: since April 
1, 1971. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and tiled that the 
defendant is a non resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 1228 Southern Avenue, 
S.E. NO. 304, Washington, 
DC. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
^ys after due publication 
herof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. , 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: J. Cortts Fruit, Deputy 

Clerk 

Samuel Goldblatt 

804 Plaza One 

Norfolk, Virginia 

3a>,27-4 3,10-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
15th day of March, 1974. 

ORDERO^ 
PUBLtCAtlON 

Mary E. Hill, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Rondle G. Hill, 
D^endant. 

Theoblect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
1480 South 37th Street, Fort 
Pierce, Florida 3i4M. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within fen (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

Jolw V. Fentr«s: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

(Jutland & Gary 

112 United Virginia Bank 

BIdg. 

Norfolk, VA 

3-a6, 27, 4-3, 10-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginlaf 

in the clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of theClty 
ofVlrginIa Beach, on the 
18th day of March, 1974. 

OROEROF 
PUBLt«ATION 

Sheryll A. Romlch, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

John A. Romlch, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of constructive 
desertion, or desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a resi- 
dent of the State of Virginia, 
the last known post office 
address being: 412 Water 
Street, Belle Haven, North 
Carolina 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
herof. and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

William F. Burnslde 
958 Laskin Rd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

3 20, 27, 43, 10-4T 



Connomwealth of Virginia, 

in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
wi Virginia Beach, on the 
15th day of March, 1974 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 



Jerry Lee Davis, 

Plaintiff, ° 

against 

Mary Elaine Davis, 

Defendant. 

Theoblect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address belna: 
4421 Alpine Street, Boise, 
Idaho 83705 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten !10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in thiasult. 

John V. Fentress. Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Moore, Brydges 8> Cohen 
2413 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

3 20, 27, 43, 10-4T 







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"I I HELP WANTED M-F | 



HtWWtnMdMmilr » 

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n-ACC A "PEHSON TO PeRSOH" AD 

IN ANY OF THE ABOVE CUttSIFICATIC^IS 

CALL4a6-»430 



tmmmmm 



^^^^mm 



CIcissified 



Pa99 B^-The Sun-Wadnesday, April 10, 1974 



486-S450 



Tell Someone 
You Care With a 
Sun Newspaper 

Sunshine Ad 




Call Classified 
486-3430 

Call Monday 

Before 5:00 P.M. 

To Place Your 

Sunshine Ad 



3 Special Satvicw 



CHILORENS ENTER 
tainment — Puppets & 
Magic Anna Bell 428-1804 

Foot A/tassage by qualified 
Foot-reflexology Therapist 
located at Va. Beacti, for 
appointment 425-8163. 

REDUCE SAFE 8. FAST 
with GoBese Tablets 8> E- 
Vap "water pills", Barr's 
Drug. 

REDUCE Safe 8. Fast with 
GOBESE Tablets 8< E-Vap 
"water pills", MURDEN 
DRUGS. 



S Lost ft Found 



RATES: "Person to 
Person" ads for individuals 
buying, selling, renting, or 
offering a service. Up to 12 
words, only SI per issue, 
add 50 cents for each 
additional 4 words. 

Classified display $2.52 
per column Inch, with a 
minimum charge of S5.04 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: 25 cents 
per line, minimum charge 
of $2.00. 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
pubiic;ation. In cohitin 
classifieds accepted un.,1 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd., 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mall to Classified Desk; or 
phone 486 3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



LOST DOG: Part terrier, 
part poodle; named 
"Pepper" Beige collar. Call 
4997569 

FOUND — Gold Wedding 
Band, initials PRH, 2-13-65 
engraved inside. V.B. area. 
497 5471. 

PUPPIES (6) Free to good 
homes. 116 London Bridget 
rd., 486-8604 



1-SUNSHlNE ADS 

DIANE AND TOM— Much 
Happiness and Love 
Always. Sister Sondra. 

DEAR NEWLYWEDS — 
Happy Days, ALWAYS. 
The Genius and Assistant! 

tfOE — Enjoyed Saturday 
yery much. Fuzzy won't be 
as fuzzy this week-endl 
Happy Easter. S. 



STEVE — Happy National 
Take A Forklift Drivisr To 
Lunch Week!!! 

PUNKIN'N TATE — Here's 
your name in print. Happy 
Easter. TERRY 

IRMA — Welcome .to the 
Sun. Where the action Is! 
Get those ads honey ! ! The 
Staff. 

Mama and oaooy — 
Happy Easter. We love you 
very much. Sondra 8> 
Diane. 



gNNOUNCEMENTO 



SSpccUSeivioet 

ALTERATIONS — Ladles, 
Mens, Childrens, 18 years 
experience. Near Hilltop. 
Pickup and delivery in 
Laskin Rd. 8, Beach area. 
Reasonable. 428-3283. 

ALTERATIONS «i 
SEWING, also Crocheted 
Bikinis. 486-0008. 

AUTO JUNK 

Towed Away Free 
Call 8S5-4372 



WE TOW, 
JUNK CARS 

aat\u 



BLOOD DONORS 
NEEDED 
Earn Immediate cash. $40'*' 
160 a nwntti. Blood plasma 
urgently needed. 



NORFOLK 
PLASAAACORP. 



733GranbySt. 



623-3173 



B&L 

TAX SERVICE 

YOUR Taxes done 
In "YOUR HOME!" 

Spaclallzing In all forms of 
ItsmizM D«ductlonf 

Wa com* to VOUft HOME- 
SAVINQ your time and 9**1 

LOW as icl2.50 

Itemized 
Kate b F^eral 

CALL 460-0776 
after 1 PM 



8 Burial Loto 



CEMETERY LOT — 
Rosewood Memorial Park, 
1 lot, 4 graves; in the 
Garden of the Last Supper. 
426 7767. 

■ automobiles! 



11 Aatomobilei Foi Sale 



.CHRYSLER — New 
Yorker, 1970. 4 dr. hardtop. 
Excel, cond. $1495. Davis 
Corner Motors, 497-8100. 

FORD— 1972 LTD, 4- door 
hardtop, fully equipped. Call 
545-3480. 



FIREBIRD - 1973, VB, 
Automatic. Just assume 
balance. Call after 6 — 427- 
1451. 

IMPALA — 1965, excellent 
mechanical cond., new 
tires, starter Si battery, etc. 
Needs paint. $450 or best 
offer. 340-0235. 



PONTIAC — 1967 Ventura, 
air conditioned, low 
mileage. 1 owner. 
Excellent cond. $750. 340- 
2753. 

PINTO-1973, Air cond., 
automatic, many extras, new 
tires. 853-1353. 



RENAULT 



Th« nation's largest iaiection of 
used Henaults from fhe nation's 
largest Renault dealer. AM 
models, colors and prices. A/tost 
are one owner cars with our 
famous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E. LITTLE CREEK RD. 5M 



VOLKSWAGEN — '67. 
Perfect condition. Special 
$895. Davis Corner Motors, 
497-8100. 

VOLKSWAGFN-1970 Station 
Wagon. Excellent condition. 
FM 8 track Stereo. $1650. 340- 
2519, afternoons. 



TERRIFIC BUYS 

1966 CORVETTE- 4 
apeed coupe, AM-FM. 
Red tinah, mag wheels^ 
extra dean. 
1969 MERCURY 
COUGAR- V-8, auto- 
matic, power steering, 
air conditioned, radio 
and heater. ReMly to go! 

$1595 

1968 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME- 2 door hard- 
top, V-8, automatic, 
power lieabig, air 
conditioned, radio, 
hMter, vinyl roof. 

$1445 

1969 PONTIAC LeMans, 
2 door hardtop, V-8, 
autonutic, power ste«r- 
ii^, radio, heater, vinyl 

"°' $1395 

JESSUP MOTOR CO. 

2341 ViJ^nia Beach Blvd. 
(At London Brkige) 
340.1213 



CANDY THE CLOWN 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Openings. SB7-3697. 



E<i«i|Hmit 



ADDRESSOGRAPH 

MULTIGRAPH MACHINE 

MODEL NO. 1700-B 

EictllMt CMiKwR. Idtal for Chiircli, 
CMC, «r MaH •rfaiizatfMs with 
mtUam Ml to tKctttf MM platn. 
AboM a^ includes filing cabinet and 
Cravats for mailing plates 

mamutmm 

A 4M-3430,«eekda3fs 9 am to 5 pm 



TRISCREATIONAd 



19 Camp, Sports Equip. 



34 He» Wanted IM> 

START YOUR OVm 
CAREER 

in a fast growing business. 
Unlimited prestige in 
expanding market. Sales 
experience or training 
helpful. For appt. call 497- 
2236. 



FISHING 

ROD & REEL 
REPAIR 
A SERVICE 

486-1296 
after 6 P.M. 



21 Boats, Maiine Supplfes 

AUTHORIZED 

T-CRAFT DEALER 

JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOMES 



FH: 855-2510 



32 Help Wanted gemalf 



HAIRDRESSERS. 

VIVIAN WOODARD 

BEAUTY 

CONSULTANTS. 

mmediate openings, full 

or part-time. Call Mrs. 

Vesely, 340-3230, 420-6808. 



16 Motonydes, Scooteis 

YAMAHA — 1973, 350 cc. 
$795. Call after 6 p.m. 425- 
7048 

18 Campeis, Tiailos 

AlSISTREAM TRAILER — 
>1W9 31. ft. Solvlent, 
excellent condition. Slightly 
used by 1st owner. $7,000 or 
best offer. 340-7704. 



TELEPHONE 
SOLICITORS 

TOP PAY 
PLUS COMMISSION 

TUES. & THURS. 
FROM 

5:30 to 8:30 P.M. 

excellent 
WorKinq Conditions 

EXPERIENCED ONLY 
NEED APPLY 

Call 486-3430 

Between* 5 
Monday tliru Friday 



LADIES 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Loca I progressive 
company will train 3 ladies 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 

$610 month to start 
Plus bonuses and benefits 

Call 499-2763 



33 Help Wanted Male 



ALARM INSTALLATION 
4. SALES 

MEN 
NEEDED 
NOW 

$150 a week Salary 
Call Mr. N«lion at 857-5442 



34 H^ Wanted M-F 



INSURANCE Secretary — 
Insurance agency has 
career opportunity for 
individual interested in 
becoming an insurance 
secretary. Cair 425-7220. 

OPENINGS FOR 
3 PEOPLE 

Work part or full time. Good 
Steady Income in your area, 
no experience necessary. For 
appointment, call 623-4641. 

MANAGEMENT TRAIN- 
EE Can earn $200 
week salary while 
attending management 
training school if qualified. 
Will learn Inventory 
Control, Accounts 
Receivable. Must learn how 
product is sold and how to 
teach others. Phone Mr. 
Bailey, 499-4606. 




WANTED 
IMMEDIATILYI 

6 men and women to start 
in good paying job. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided. 

No experience necessary. 
We will train ypu. 

Call 499-2763 



47 Dogs, Cats, Othw Ht» 

BASSET HOUNDS — Male, 
Female, 3 years old. 
Registered. 486-3058.) 

BEAGLES — 1 male 8 weeks, 
$25, Ml mos. old, $35. 583 
3176. 

CHIHUAHUAS — AKC. 
Adult male, also puppies, 
$85. 340 1636. 



$5 each 



HAMSTERS 
With cages 



486-3699 



36 Jobs Wanted 



BABYSITTING — in my 
home or yours. Available 
anytime, cfall 490-2293 

CHILD DAY CARE — for 
working mothers In . my 
home. Lynnhaven area. 
Reasonable. 481-0410. 



PEKEA POO Pups. Wor 
med. I temporary, shot. 
Males. 430 6388O , '^^ " 

RABBITS — Babies, white 
8i colored. California t New 
Zealand mixed. 497-8790. 

RABBITS — Adult tM 
babies, Checkers t, Duta|. 
486-6324. 

SAMOYED - male. 
Excellent with children. 
Amateur prize winrwr. 497 
9177. 



LITTLE FRIEND to play 
with, my mommy will take 
care of you while yours 
works. Windsor Woods. 340- 
6765. 



NEED CHALLENGE 

Creative vouno man, 
impatient with bureaucracy, 
places restless finger in the 
wind, for opportunity to 
fully utilize talents. Experi 
ence in law and 
administration, able 
organizer, coordinator and 
troubleshooter, excellent 
writer, individualistic in 
style and interest, yet can 
motivate others with 
diplomacy and right touch 
of humor. Will consider 
travel or relocation, 
partnership or 
employment, any form of 
challenge! Write Box C250, 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 Sr 
Rosemont Rd., Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23452. 

PAINTER— Feminine touch. 
Commercial and residential. 
Call 428-0293. _ 

TYPING — in my home, 
experienced secretary; 
reasonable. 420-9584. 



38 Buiineu Opportunities 

A CHANCE TO 

SUCCEED— develop your 
own business. Call 340-1317 
after 5 PM. 

OWN 8. OPERATE an 
Amway Distributorship in 
your spare time. Call 497- 
4356. 



ST. BERNARDS — 10 weeks 
old, shots. Also 1 male Toy 
Poodle puppy. All AKC. 340- 
0140. 

51 Articles For Sile 

AIR CONDITIONERS, 6,000 
BTU, $100, 8,000 (Casement) 
$100 , 18,500 , $125, excellent 
condition. 486-1691 ._ 

Bicycles - Mens 8> Womens 3 
Speed, Both Excellent 
Condition, Mans has 
speedometer, both BMA 
Certified, $120 or $60 
separate Call 428 1125 

GRANDFATHER CLOCKS— 
Large Mahogany and 
walnut. Westminister 
£hin<es^ 588^3126. 

INSULATION — 3Vj" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1379. 

YOUR AMWAY Distributor 
disappeared? Call 497-4356 
to solve your home care 
problems. 



5iA Antiques 



FURNITURE RE FIN- 
ISHED and Re- 
paired. Chairs Caned. 
Free pickup 8i delivery. 
424-2941. 



ANTIQUES 

WE BUY 
ANYTHING OLD 
Furnltura, Glassware. 

Ona Place or 
Entire Estate. 

6224182 



FURNITURE from Model 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room, $99.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recllner, 
Bunk Beds, $68 each; Maple 
Boston RQcker, $45. Easy 
terms. Call Mr. Kay at 622- 
5140, dealer. 

S2A G«ng»-Riimiiiage 

GARAGE SALE — Sat. 
Apr. 13, 10 to 1. 314— 22nd. 
St. rear cottage. 

S3 WMitadto luy 

ELECTRIC TRAINS — 
Lionel, American Flyer, 
Ives, others. Cash. 497-4213. 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band I nstruments. 
Typewriters, guns. 

LiTTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 622-6989 

S8 Good Uti^i Too Eat 

WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
the dozen or by the bushel, 
Earl Smith Oyster Co., 947 
HurdS rd., 340-5171. 

60 Lawn and Oiden 

GARDEN PLOTS 
N-'w renting, 2004 Rokeby 
av.. So. Military hwy. near 
Greenbrier Farms. 420- 
3981. 

HW SHdt-Phntsflemn 

GROW YOUR OWN fruit! 
Free copy 48 pg. Planting 
Guide Catalog in color, ot- 
tered by Virginia's largest 
growers of fruit trees, nut 
trees, berry plants, grape, 
vines, landscaping plant 
material. Waynesboro 
Nurseries- Waynesboro, 
Virginia 22980. 

63 Building Materials 

HOME Builders 8> Con- 
tractors - Let us help you 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM a. EATON 427-3200. 

64 Business Equipmeirt 

RENT OR BUY — new & 
used office furniture. Ex- 
rental desks $49 8i up. New 
damaged files $39 8> up. Free 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397-7883 



W MOBILE ^ 
■ HOMES ■ 



TO SHARE — Small 
cottage near ocean. Woman 
only. 428 1804. 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

Wlnl» rain,' 2 room offldoncy; 
wnklywd monthly ralM; eoMr TV, 
t>Mlc Wing mt cooking ulonolls, all 

utilillft. 

VIRGINIAN 

MOTOR APIS. 

310 24lli St. 

428-5333 



HOUSES 8. 
APARTMENTS 
Available, on a yearly or 
short term basis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 
XBlLislttnrd. 




76 A Movet»S«iafB 

FWRNITURE MOVING — 
Washers, dryers, 
refrigerators. Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a week and 
Holidays no extra charge. 
8S3-930e. 

WILL MOVE ANYTHING, 
24 hours a day, 7 days a 
week! Don't delay. Call 
today! 588-4715. 



77 Houses for Rent 



LAKE EDWARD WEST— 
Townhouse, 3 bedrms. IVj 
baths, washer, dryer, 
refrig., range, dishwasher. 
Vacant Apr. 4. 497-2106, 423- 
5370. 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 
— 3300 Rainier Ct., 3 
bedroom Townhouse, 
fenced yard, $225 mo. All 
appliances Including 
washer and dryer. 



n f«fi»4M<-B«t8rhf M8 

SALEM RD.— Nice 3 bedrm. 
house on large lot, plus ad- 
joining 7*/^ acres of open 
land, fine for horses. 
PILOT REALTY 
427-4800 



86PwSaieVl^giria»«idi 

BROOKWOOD — LARGE 
FAMILY ? 4'/j bedrooms, 
2V3I batlis, with large fenced 
rear yard. Call Ronnie 
Fowler, 486-4041, 486-1369. 
We trade. HIgglns Realty, 
Inc. 

BROOKWOOD — Ranch 
style, 3 large bedrooms plus 
4th room for bedroom, 
study or hobby; 2 baths, 
family rm., built-in kitchen, 
dining rm., garage. By 
owner. No agents. 340-9180. 

GREENRUN 

WHY RENT? 
Pay equity and assume this 
3 bedroom townhouse. Call 
Roy Wilkes, 486-4041, or 486- 
1796. We trade. HIgglns 
Realty, Inc. 



KING'S GRAII^ - VA 
BUYERSI 3 bedroom brick 
Ranch witn extras. Double 
garage. Robert Fowler, 486- 
4041, 4a«-i369. We trade. 
HIgglns Realty Inc. 'fa- 

NORTH LANDING FARMS 

— Plenty of garden space 
on beautiful Vi acre lot. 3 
bedroom 2 bath brick 
rwich, priced right! Call 
Robert or Ronnie Fowler, 
4864041 or 486-1369. We 
trade. HIgglns Realty, Inc. 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 

— 3 bedroom R^nch, family 
room with flr4pla.ce. Pay 
equity and assume 6-% loan 
With $110 monthly 
payments. Call Andy Wood, 
486-4041 or 3406861. We 
trade. Higgins Rea lty Inc . 

WINDSOR OAKS WEST — 

BEAT INFLATION 
Assume 7 percent VA loan 
and pay equity to get 8 
rooms of Colonial comfort 
with fireplace. Call Andy 
Wood, 486-4041, or 340-6861. 
We trade. Higgins Realty, 
Inc^ 

WINDSOR OAKS WEST - 
$32,000 
Stay cool in summer and 
cozy in winter with central 
air conditioning and 
fireplace. Ideal for the young 
or an elderly couple. Call me 
for information on financing. 
Ellie Tatanian, 486-4041 or 
340-1690. We trade. Higgins 
Realty^nc^^^^^^^^^ 

96Wm5^^fa5t^^^ 

CASH TALKS 

We buy Si sell. Need Homes. 
Call 464-6205. Crowgey 
Realty. 



86 Poi Sale Viigiala Beach 



43A General Instructienf 52 Honathnid r^md. 



VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
Morrisson, 428-0587. 



44Mvak 



PIANO TEACHER - 
Beginners through ad 
vanced. Lessons in your 
home, 428-4670. 



GRIMES 

MUSIC SCHOOL 

Rrivate Music Lessons in 
Pembroke Area 

5 String Banjo-Tenor Banjo- 
Gultar-Electrlc Bass-Hawa- 
llan Qultar-Mandolln. 

CiaAfteT4F.M. 499 1428 



$458.00 delivers 3 room 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. 1st 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of TidewateV dr., in 
Norfolk, Phone 622-4165. 

2 SOFAS — (New) Early 
American Sofa, $250, l Hide- 
a bed, $50. 490-0216. 



65 Mobile Hwnes FwSale 

1968 ALLEGHENY Delux 2 
bedroom I'/j bath with 
extras; double bed; maple 
dresser w-mirror, zenith 
stereo console; 2 air 
conditioners; new hot water 
heater. Full price $4,500. 
May stay on lot or be 
moved. Call after 5, 497- 
4594. 

OLYMPIC — 1973, 3 
bedrooms furnished. Owner 
being transferred. Just take 
over payments. 425-1991. 



Harry Kohlberg, the great Real Estate 
Magician has pulled another great 
sales achievement out of the hot! 
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH 




If you want your 
property sold, call 
Harry today. 
Million Dollar Sales 
for 1 1 straight years. 



I CALL HARRY AT 490-2317 or nighte 482-1 1 1 1 

i 630 N. Witchduck Road Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 



45 Private Inslnictions 



International Dance Studio; 
Pembroke Mall 



497-2731 or 499-9045 
Did you know tliat touch 
dandng it back? Tiy out 
intioductofy (rffei with 
hosts Jim and Juify 
Ibidgina. We are located 
be t ween Sean and Letnwi 
at PEMBROKE MALL 



38 ftiiiiiest Oppwtunities 



SPARE TIME BUSINESS 

Own your own profitable vending business. $200 to S600 month- 
ly earnings posable in your spare time (day or eve.). NO 
SQUNG. If lelected, you will be servicing company established 



^■Mm 



». 



locatk>ns. 

OUR ^amm is a supplier 

OF NABISCO SNACK ITEMS. 

REQUIREMENTS: $1,000 to $5,000 CASH INVESTMENT, 
(secured by machines and merchandise) 

good character, dependable auto, and 6 
to 9 spare hours weekly. Income starts 
immediately! We supply product, machines, 
locations, expansion financing, buy back 
option, and professional guidance. If you 
are sincerely interested in applying for this 
genuine opportunity toward financial 
success, please call or write (include 
phone number) for personal interview in 
your area to: ^^ robert l. Anderson 

WORLD INDUSTRIES INC. 
. Executive Suite 303 
1919 East 52nd Str^t 
Indianapolis, Indiana 462(% 
Telephone '{31 7) 257-5767 



HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 




USE THIS HANDY UP TO DATE ALPHABETICAIiLY US1B> 
GUIDE FOR ALL YOUR SERVKI NETOSI 




Bicycle Repairs 




leral Contractor 



Iteme improvement 



Painting 



Roofing 



l.awn Mowxr Sinicf 
Bicycle Rcpiirs, Welding 
and Ornamenlal Iron Rail- 
ingi. 

VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER & WELDING 




MARSHALL 

Construction Co. 
Refidentlal and 
Comnnerclal.Re- 
pairs and . . ' 
improvanrtNrjt 

5874205 
< jS3-42I 



L.E.PIFER 

General 

Contractor 

Additions, repairs, 

carpentry work. 

References furnished. 

Call 4204486. 



Concrete 



Plastering 



PAINTING 

REPAIR 

CALL 

427-1750 

FOR ESTIMATE 



ROOFING 
Call us for your 

Roof ii% Needs 
FREE ESTIMATES 

ROOF REPAIR 
I SERVICE CO. 

855-7155 



Tile 



Exterminating 



LgpNCRETE WORK 

1^ PATIOS 

DRIVEWAYS 
.& SLABS 
CALL 

855-7111 



ROACH PROBLEM? 

Your problem Is 

wr specialty! 

For experf service. 

Call 

Burton's Pest Control Co. 

497 9182 

(anytime) 



Gener^ Contractor 



Electrical Contractor 



BLACK 
BROTHERS 

9tmtn 

Boat toprweiaM* 

GoBtnaon 
G«ntt Beflten 



mmSkm 
Rooto • Carporli 
Ifltrhei ItBwnifctlnfc 



CAUANnVME 
545^18 




PLASTERING 
DRY WALL 



fr 




Home 
Improvements 

Call 
CLIFF STOUT 
Ph. 855-5370 



PAINTING INTERIOR 
8. EXTERIOR 

work done rtaionaMy . 
Fraa Estlmata*. _ 



JJC. MOODV t SONS 



TILE WORK 

ALL NEW OR OLD 

BATHS OR KITCHENS 
BIG OR SMALL 

5171730 or 






627-q044 I 



Wallpapering 




ELECTRICAL 

cwmtAcnNt 



D.E.MITCHELt 
426-7262 




. OVERALL 
^UlY WALL WORK 

Piee Eatfanates 
AcoBMtkSpny 

MOORE'S DRY WALL 
424-2516 



PAINUNG 

inMflsrtExMrtar 

MASTE|l DUTCRUAN 

InMrMr i Eidorlor 
'J Docoralcrs 

420-1603 

MknrBami* 



. 



WALLPAPERING 

wittia 

FEMIt4INE TOUCH 

Free Estimates 

No Job too Small 

464-«377 

4«4-64«9 



Home ImiM'ovemantt 



PhimtMng & tteting 



Plastering 



Lymtar'ind bwUdInt iMMnM. 
foOfR addltlof^^stsm dBors and 
windows, wall 10 waif carpet; 
vkiyt iMInv. FrM cstlmaM*. 
tOTfm. 

VELUM *EAlQl^n«l 
427-SMO 



njmiiRir^ 

ADRYWAU. 

R^alrs & Remodelino 
& Patchwork 

NEW & OLD WORK 

*ray ■ 

CAlLGMm 



L»mHAVB( 

runumG 

AfOAtBtO 

WeDetfic 

•••tWMrk 

forLetsI 

Callusi 



Tin 40,000 
PtopteAlNNrt 
YoarScract; 

To pIcM your »d in 
this dirtctory eati 

Mrs. Ann Parker 
4864430 



- ■ - - - 



»W^is^a"^W" 



■^llli^MIVpBWIWI 



^ir^nmrm^^r^m'i^^m^fm^ 



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Real Estate 



The Sun-Wednesday, April 10, 19/4- Page B-9 



IIHKONSUMERlHir 

Watery fuel 
can 




car engines 

By Peter Weaver 

ii. I heard that some of the Rasoline we might be 
gettinff has some water in it because it's bought on the 
blacit market. Is this true? If so. how can we protect 
our car?— Mrs. J.W.. Weston. Mass. 

V. There are rumors that black market gasoline is 
being sokl and that is might be contaminated with 
some water. It's also a fact that a number of filling 
stations have had topump gas rightdown^ the bottom 
of their tanks where moisture lends to collect. 

You can protect your carburetor and engine from 
damage caused by too much moisture in the gasoline 
by adding a can of dry-|S!as or gas-line antifreeze once 
every five weeks or so (once a month is easier to 
remember). 

Vou can buy it at gasoline stations but it costs 
anywhere from $1.00 to $1.25 a can. If you buy the dry- 
g»s additive at a chain store or independent auto parts 
stor^— on sale— you can get it for a case price that 
comes out toaround 20 to23 cents a can. Get a case and 
pour" a can Into the gas tank the first of every month or 
whichever date is easy to remember. 

Put the dry-gas in regularly, winter and summer, 
mechanics say, and your engine will have a better 
chance to go longer without majw repairs. 

One other warning. Gasoline stations, according to 
law, must now offer no>lead gasoline, which is 
necessary for upcoming anti-polution devices on cars. 
Older pars, before 1971-72 models„should not use no- 
lead gasoline. Check your car's manual to see if your 
car cdn teike no-lead. Some cars made in 1971 or 1972 
can take no-lead but not all the time. Using no-lead 
gasoline in an oMer car could seriously damage the 
engine. 



Mind Your Money 



Q. My. son was injured in a school football game. 
The school's foott)8ll insurance paid for treating the 
original injury but will not pay for recurring problems 
relating to the injury. What can we do? — Mrs. D.T., 
Greenbelt, Md. 

A. Whenever you have a personal injury problem 
with an insurance company it pays to be represented 
by a lawyer. Check with your employer, union, lending 
institution or local bar associatiw for lawyere' names. 
Lawyers can take personal injury cases against an 
insurance company on a contingency basis which 
means, if you win, you get money from Uie insurance 
company mirais one-third or so which goes to the 
lawyer, ff you lose, you don't have to pay the lawyer 
anything. _i "I", ^ 

Q. I want to put my mwiey in a Swiss bank: I'm 
worried about the way things are going in our country. 
Where can I get names of reputable Swiss banks?— 
Mrs. E.M.L. Lexington* Mass. 

•■\. There are many reputable Swiss banks. Three of 
a^m have corresp»nden6« branch offices in ,,Mew 
Yo*. They are: Swiss Credit Bank, 100 Wall St., New 
York 10005- Union Batdc of Switzerland, 14 Wall St., 
New York 10005; Swiss Bank Corp., 15 Nassau St., New 
York 10006. 

A word of warning. Swiss savings accounts pay 
considerably less Interest than accounts in U.S. banks. 
If you have your money in a U.S. savings institution 
(bank, savings and loan, savings bank ot credit union) ■ 
which is federally insured, your money is going to be as 
safe as it would be in a Swiss*ank— and it will be a lot 
closer for quick withdrawal. 

If you're thinking of putting your money into Swiss 
currency, it's sort of like playing the stock market, in 
relatiorehip witii the Swiss franc. Uie dollar may be 
worth mwe w may be worth less over the next year or 
so. 

@ King Features Syndicate, Inc.. 1974. 
Peter. Weaver weJcomes questions from readers 
for posubie use in his cohaan. Phase tend letters 
to him in care of Virginia Beach Sun, 1S8 Rose- 
mont Road, Virgina Beach, Va. 23452 




I i iiai I ce/ 1 ?iisi nessj^liconomy 

Westman learns 
sales techniques 



People's 
in Pungo 



TIm- I'iiii,u«i hriiiuli 
iiflii I' of Pj'oph'S 
liaiik i^t'l'i riiiishini^ 
loiichcs III lurt' iIm' 
<»|M'nin^, I Im" ti'ui- 
|KMii'r\ liuildinu will 
I' \ «■ II 1 1) ;i 1 1 \ ■ • he 
r<|)l;m'd h\ ;i por- 
iii.uH-iil stiiirtnro. 
(Stilt t)hoi() iiN HikI 
■^1:11111 1 



, I. .1.11 1! VVi'stm;in Jr nf 
\iimiiia H<'.Hh rpciMiily 
l.',ra(lu,ili'il iroiii ,t cnrin't 
salt's vMirksliiip at the J • ' 
I'ciincN h'cmonal Trainini; 
('enter III .Atlaiil.'i 

The wiirksliiip oCfcrcrl 
ivaiiiiiu; 111 |n'rs(inal 



moiivalioii, advanced sales 
Ipchniqucs and customer 
relations, 

Mr. Westman has been 
with the .I.e. Penney Co. 
since 1971 He is currently 
I mployt'd as a carpet 
sfH'cialist at the firm's 
store in Militarv Circle. 



Calfee honored as 
life sales leader 



\StirHi ( ( 'altt'c has hccn 
iiaiiied Smilhv^csleni iaie 
i iisiiranee Co i .SLK.' i 
I cidor al tlie Monlh in the 
coni pa tiy 's Norfolk 
terriUiiv lor the riKHilh ul 
l''el>iii,irv. Mr ("allfc is the 
i-i»nipaM\'s \'iruiiiia I'eacli 



agent. 

sue bcRan this year's 
operation with $117.04 in 
as.st'ts for each $100 of 
liabilitii's The company 
recenlly i olchrated its 71st 
anniv«T.sarv, 



Oceans offers condominium living 



The $14 million Oceans 
Condominium at 4004 
Oceanfront is scheduled for 
occupancy sometime in 
early 1975. The 

condominium's sales office 
is now open for business. 

(>ceans. will be ' a 
permanent residence 
condominium offering a 
broad range of apartment 
sizes and prices,_aj)rivate 
club with ,; studio 
apartments and 
specialized personal 
services to residents. 

The condominium- 
Oceans apartments will he 
in the 21-Story Oceans 
Tower. The tower will 
contain over 200 units 
ranging from efficiency 
studios to one. two. and 
three-bedroom apart- 
ments. There will also 
be luxurious two-story 
penthouses 

IMtlCKS begin at $36,000 
for one-bedroom units to 
more than $200,000 for the 
penthouses. 

The Oceans Club will be 
connected to the tower by 
an enclosed bridge across 
Atlantic Avenue. The club 
will contain an Olympic 
.sized pool, two cocktail 
lounges with swim-up bar. 
two restaurants, a snack 
bar, private rooms for 
parties and meetings, 
health facilities including 
saunas, plus shower and 
exercise rooms. 

An activities director will 
be available at the club. 
which will also have a 
swimming coach for 
children and full catering 
services. Sixteen studio 
apartments will be 
adjacent to the club on the 
beachfront. 

Cornells S. Kooiman is 
general manager of the 
Oceans Club. He will direct 
all club (derations. He is a 
farmer director of food and 
beverage at Yellowstone 
National Park. 

CONDOMINIUM buyers 
purchase their homes but 
lease their land. The land- 
lease arrangement enables 
the developer to retain 



ownership of the land wlide 
the purchaser realizes a 
purchase price 20 to '.SO per 
cent lower since land costs 
are not included in the 
selling price 

The units are sold a! 
construe! iiin cosi and liie 
developer lakes his proI'M 
over a '.W year lease 
a r r a n g e in e n t '!" h c 
dcvejnper llius mai ntains ; i 
lony term inlcresi in the 
proje.ct. 

After, the receril dceans 
groundl)r(\ak.iny . ilu 
developers of i he 
condominium pinicri 
announced the firsl of 



- r \ e r a 1 
idnlnbutioiis ii' 

causes lii \'iijiiiii. 
The \ i|-L'MiKi 
Kniernenrv ('(nnh. 
I'rouT.ih: ii'i'i 
I'hei n I I'HUi 

|->'l'l.l(|iH'. ,! j'l 

jiMpahiM- Sv- i' ! 
Ne^^ ', ..rk 
l)Uilder of ( Irs : !,'■. 

r It !■ <! ! 

diM'liipi'i . ' 

a p( rliii • 

\t-)ri(4k Sv Hi, 
ot a m V I , 
nu oh 1- ! ii, • 
I'onuniniil y 



K ipai Hill 
I cw ,( ! e r 
ii'iHinilv 



i.v Ihi^ 
hu s i iicss 
m the 




Heach 
Ii \ I '.ife 



r V (■ I 



^'v n!|ihiinv's ffloVts 

UTI,l,l\Ms A la/ewetl 

,1 ie ai rliilt 1 1^ ami 
aisiiuiel's o| Ihe tirojce! 
iHiii laeior IS \,uitMiaid* 
( '(inslruelioii ,\ll,inlie ol 
Norfolk, 




■pi 



Pembroke Courts Apartments 

Big living at compact prices 

PEMBROKE COURTS FvlONTHLV PAVMFiJT! 
lAII utilitii-s includeii! 
One bedroom S190 fknu) si/p br-Hrootn tviiiS^fO! 

2 bedroom Type t 
2bedroom Typi' M 
Z'bedroom Tvpt' HI 
2b(!droom Typo IV 



S215 ( 
S218 

S7.ir 



imund 



h.illv 



3bedroom S2ri() 

3bedroom Townhouse S3 1') i 



Eictbstvc AQcnt 

H|l Perobf ote Jtealtv 

7'u ^Jilj^ broke mM. Vp.ui. 

. "3^ 499 3606 W,.,!.-,. 
flay 10 6. Sonff-iy 
club housp. o!ym|! 



il 



it) 



•GOT ITCHY FEET? ' 






' lu Ip ii-lliny, yi 



'JU.iiighli 4,'*l ~i- ' 

] 16 London BuiJ** Shopping C«nHi 
Virgihin 9«»ch. Vi, ■ 



lillllUIIEIS 



EVERYTHING FOR YOUR^OMfe 




FREE ESTIMATES 

• Kitchens •Family Rooms 

•Bedrooms •Convert 

Garages 



All WOffK 
IMSURSD 



545-4613 



.\ridcd space to your home means added value to 
> our hoine. Make your home more comfortable and 
convenient h\ adding a ru<)ni...Uon'l Wait..,CALL NOW 



IliMBI R AM3 IIOMI Kl VI()I)EUN<; 
W.S WH SON KOAIXCIIKSAPI AKE54S-4«I3| 

if- Yiijn r)) (.'tiniiniinilv Si'r\ivc 



FREE 
ESTIMA!ES 



n ii#» ir^*« ^ mp ** 



.S£LUN€...RENTING...BUYING...TMDIM 

BISSEn REALTY, INC. 

"A Resplcled Name In Real tsi; , 

Thalia Shopping Center 
4316 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 
SALES 

Mike Vance, GRI 340-7000 ! owell P, -v 
Rose Bissett, GRI 340-9898 Lee O'Brien 

RENTALS 

Jack Bissett, GRI 340-5fi26 

OFFICE 340-9721 



m^i 



Rent beautiful 
new furniture 





witfi purchase option 

i\;iitiii>. 200 corTihinaluins of 
' \ ■', , nil i.'jse with tlic oiitiuii 
iJiuihial ili-iiH (II iom|ilvto 
Ms f.iii-s. V>i' jlsiiDtfiT fiifid' 
1 iinipli'lt' ' 
illlllti' CflH.! il 



-URN I TUBE REWIAL. 

AAETROLEASE 



tg>)^ nt-veiand St 



, Viruiui;i Bench, Va, 
. IK- (804f 49<>.9«88 

1 Hi»{l. « !fi»«»iJ»«»i««»y. 




i^H^ 



Old 'Doiiatioii, 

GARDEN APARTMENTS ' 

. S, w ami lovely In Park-Like Summndingt J 
I & 2 BEDROOMS NOW LEASING 



Beautiful spacious rooms, fully 

carpeted, with ample clowtt 

big eal-inkilchens with ouUide windows 

large storage area In each apartment 

Individual entrances 

front door parkmg 

close to shopping 

Off Independence Blvd. on Honey Grove Rd 
Across from Haygood Shopping Centmr in 
Beautiful Old Donation Manor 

CALL46(H)921 



Graduates 
from course 

Evangelista A. Zeppieri 
of Virginia Beach was 
graduated from United 
Schools Inc., Kmmville, in 
the field of insurance 
adjusters. 

His course covered all 
major aspects <rf the 
insurance field and 
consisted of 70 lessons. 



HOW 
MUCH 
DO YOUR 
UTILITIES 
COST 




Aixtmums < 
wcwwm 

SEEOURFURNKHED 
M(MKL 

■tMUTOr 

1.2,43 bedroon\ 
Apartments, 
/ TownlKMiws, 
Ganton and Bachialor. 

LASmfKOADl^T 
IPHONB;4»MI3 



tgimi2immi2iigiigiraiz»gii2iiir 

SI 
ISI 

igi 




providing 

greater . 
^ rewards. 




I 



ISI 

la 



IMETR01 
" MLS 






V- 



340-0000 

3314 Virginia laadi lly^. 
Virginia Btoch, Va. 



460-1177 

4700 Througligood Squart 
Va. Itoch, Vs. 




420-0000 

km Mian Rivtr U. 
Va. Ifofh, Vo. 



3 



rgi 

12 

I2i 
121 
121 
121 
12 



1 THE ERA'S _ OF ESTES R EALTY 




^1 PROFESSION ALjl 



EALTY C0RRI2 



* 

Ik 

Ik 
Tk 

Tk 



ResidBntial Specialists Known Throughout Tkimmtm' 

DEAL [B WITH [Q USI 



\ 



ESTES 



MEMBER REALTORS MLS OF TIDEWATER 



i 






Fige B-lO-Thc Sun-Wedi»sday. April.XO. 1974 



Despite slow start, co-op organizers have faitit 



By LINDA MILLER 
Snn Staff V^riter 

Would you like to buyja loaf of homemade 
bread for 35 cents, chee^ for $i.ii per pound 
and soybeans for 26 cenfe per pound? Sounds 
too cheap to be true, but those are the prices 
at the Forte Food Co-o6. 

The co-op. a realizati(|n of a dream of Forte 
FoundationPresidentD^gDias, has recently 
opened its doors to provide an alternative for 
Beach consumers who (ire fed up with sky- 
rocketing grocery prices. With a few of his 
friends providing a minimal staff, Mr. Dias is 
working to establish, th£ co-op as a 
community center where persons can 
purchase anything th«r would find in the 
local grocery store, bit at a cheaper price. 

"As free peqile, we can control the 
economy if we work together," says Mr. Dias. 
"We can keep the (food) prices down." 

MR. DIAS is helped in the cooperative 
venture by Forte Foundation officers and 
staff, including Huldah Andrews, Jean 
Passmore. Trish Msmthey, Ted Goranson and 
Robert Boyd. The group has set up shop in a 
newly built warehouse at 612 10th St. 

The co-op as a total replacement for a 
grocery store hovtfever is just talk right now , 
The warehouse is barren at the present time. 
Only two make-shift counters stand near the 
huge door, and crates and concrete blocks 
scattered arramd the room serve as shelves 
for the few products the co-op has begun to 
stock. 

The Forte Co-op is stocking its shelves 
(which it has yet to buil4) (Hily as fast as the 
co-op membership grows. Except for a small 
investment to get the co-<^ started, the Forte 
cooperative is financing itself with its 
membership dues. It cpst' $50 per year per 
person or family to be a lember of the co-op. 
Half of that fee goes to finance the member's 



product line buying. (Each member makes 
outa list when he joins of what product names 
he prefers to purchase.) The other ti& goes 
toward the co-op's operatimal costs, such as 
warehouse rental and utilities. 

Right now, the co-op membersWp is only 
about 40 persons or families. Co-op 
organizers say that membership is increasing 
everyday, but in checking with them at 
various times during March, the membership 
number remained the same. 

THE MEMBERSHIP. though 

predominantly younger persons and families, 
is not just youth. The co-op is also attracting 
members of ttie dder generation too. 

"Older people in the community have really 
gotten excited," says one co-op organizer. 
"They can remember when bread was a 
nickle a loaf and have seen different 
economic stages in our nation when co-ops 
have been tried or thought of." 

"The problem is that there is a great deal <rf 
skepticism about trying something like this," 
says Mr. Dias. "So many people have been 
ripped <rff so many Umes that they're afraid 
to put down$$0 on an idea. It's all a matter (A 
believing, tf a person gets something 
inexpensive, he says what's the catch? But, 
there doesn' t need to be a catch. If we work 
together cooperatively, we can do it." 

HULDAH ANDREWS, the co-op's head 
buyer and only paid employe is busy 
contacting various food brokerages, dealers 
and local farmers from which to buy 
products. The group hopes to elminate all 
dealings with "the middlemen" to keep the 
prices down. 

The group is "going back to the source" as 
Ms. Andrews puts it. She is still looking for 
area farmers who are interested in dealii^ 
with the co-op and hopes to try to use the 



Farmers' Mai^cet M Diamond Springs Road 
as a sMirce for some items. Until 
membership builds up where the co-op can 
feasibly purchase mwchandise by the case, 
they are buying regular grocery line items 
through a large cooperative in Norfolk., 

Thou^ the co-op carries mainly organic 
health foods right now, they plan to offer 
everything from health foods and meat and 
poultry to cleaning materials and beauty 
aids. .The co-op organizers say the stcnre will 
look much like ar^r grocery store with one 
etception. There will be only one item (A a 
particular brand on the shelf. Members will 
make a grocery list and while they weigh out 
their own sugar and produce, co-op workers 
will fill their orders. 

UNLIKE THE opo^tion of the other 
cooperatives members of the Fwte Co-op are 
not compelled to share the work load at the 
warehmise. A member need oily pay his fee 
and shop for groceries when he wants to. (The 
co-op is to be a non-pr(rfit organization. Forte 
Foundation officers plan to begin oth^ 
money making projects and services once the 
co-op is off the. ground.) 

The Forte Co-op organizers also see 
nutrition education as part of their service 
role in the cwnmunity. They jrian to r^rint 
and distribute articles telUAg members 
exactly what they are getting to eat when they 
purchase certain foods. 

"We want it to be a community service," 
says Jean Passmore, the co-op's secretary- 
treasurer. "It's not just going to be for those 
persons who are off on an organic (food) 
trip. We want to meet the needs of the 
community. Whateve^r they want, we will try 
to supply." 

But, the coK)p has had ite set-backs. One 
problem has been with ttie contractor 
working on the warehouse who was slow^in 



getting the construction comi^eted. And at 
last visit, Uie electricity had yet to be turned 
on. Co-op organizers actually started 
{damting the busings last October. But Forte 
Co-op members are as mthusiast^c about the 
cooperative ventut-e as are the coke's 
cr^nizeb — and they are undaunted by its 
slow beginning. 

"A1.L NEW THINGS start slowly," says 
Anna Hastings. "But, I like die spirit 
of the group. I jdned the co-o| primarily 
so I could buy food at a lower cost and get food 
that I thou^t was of a higher quality than 
that in the grocery store. I wanted to support 
the grmip because they have an interest in 
■promoting a better mode df livipg for tlie 
average person." 

(The Forte Foundation Js planning -to 
expend its community services into a 
coffeehouse, a Montessori school, a 
photography iiBtitute, a creative arts center ' 
and theatre and a speakers' forum. Ms. . 
Hasting says she also joined because she 
hopes to .teach art lessons with the group at a 
later date.) 

"Most persons are just scared to put down 
$50 even though that's what the coH)p needs to 
really get gdng," says Millard Arnold. "I 
guess we are taking a chance, but I feel 
strongly. I've belonged to other co-ops before, 
but Biey were powly organized, powly 
managed and they loet funds partly because 
of overstocking. Here, you're paying $50 to 
start a professional staff. I got tired of (in 
other co-ops) hearing ttem say you have to 
show up twice a week to share your time and 
the wwk. I'd rather pay someone to save me 
money." 

"Food prices are outrageously high, 
especially here in the Beach," says Orin 
Domenico. "I am somewhat discouraged, but 
I sort of expected it to be slow in the 
beginning." 




HOPING TO BEAT the food prices at local 
stores. Forte co-op members shop among the 
meac^er stock at the co-op warehouse on 10th 
Street. Forte worker Robert Boyd rings up the 
sale for co-op member Anna Hastings. (Sun 
photo bv Neal Sims) 



r-. 



HJ 



Ciyic 

leader 

resigns 

on 
doctor's 
orders 




COLEMAN 

Aftet serving four months as president of the 
Council (rf Civic Organizations (CCO), Arch 
Coleman, 74, has resigned that office on the advice 

of his (kx:tor. 

Effective April 1, Mr. Coleman was replaced as 
president by former first vice-president Joe E. 
Clugston 35. / 

Mr. Coleman said his doctor ordered him to give 
up all outside activities. He plans to devote most of 
his time now to writing a book about his wartime 
experiences in the OSS (Office of Strategic Ser- 
vices). -• 

Mr. Coleman, who lives in the Robin Hood Forest 
area of the city, was elected in November as CCO 
president, succeeding Sam Houston Sr., now a city 
planning eommissioner. 

Mr. Clugston, who has been a CCO member for 
two years, is on the board of directors of the civic 
organization and is a former president of the Birch- 
wood Civic League. 

He is a realtors associate wiU) Executive Real 
Estate Sales Corp. 



Candidates charge bias 
as Forum endorses five 



The Virginia Beach Forum, a 
political group, endorsed five 
candidates last week for the 
Virginia Beach City Council 
race. 

The group decided to back 
Reid Ervin for the Lynnhaven 
Borough seat. Garland Isdell 
for the Kempsville seat, 
Gaynette Winter for the 
Bayside seat and Patrick 
Standing and Edward Lynk in 



the race fw the two at-large 
seats. 

All of the candidates 
receiving endorsements were 
recommended by the 
candidates screening 
committee. The candidates 
filled out a questionnaire 
identical to one circulated to 500 
Beach residents, as well as a 
more in-depth questionnaire 
concerning city problems and 
were interviewed by the 



Dam Neck land 
preserve seen 



The 71 acres of excess Navy 
land at Dam Neck given to the 
city recKitly could be turned 
into a wildlife preserve similar 
to Seashore State Parit. 

Richard Murphy, assistant 
superintendent in the city's 
parks and maintenance 
department, said that the land, 
on the southern end of Red Wing 
Lake golf course, is partially 
swampy. 

AltlKHigh discussions wi use of 
I he land are merely conjecture 
at this time, Mr. MuqAy said, 
thought has been given to 



STUDENT HONORED 

Louise Ann Watson of 
Virginia Beach was recently 
initiated into Alpha Lambda 
Delta national scholastic honor 
society for freshmen womm 
college students. 

Ms. Watson is a freshman at 
Longwood College, Farmville, 
where she is majoring in 
elementary education with 
plans to teach upon graduati(Mi 



constructing a bridge 
connecting the parcel to Red 
Wing Park and possibly putting 
in boats for recreati(»ial use. 

MR. MURPHY SAID there is 
now no access to the parcel, 
valued ai $70,000, except through 
the golf course fairways. The 
land is not on the oceanfront. 

The 71-acre parcel was given 
to the city Friday under the 
federal Legacy of Parks 
program, established to 
transfer excess federal land to 
the public domain for 
recreational use. 

Councilman J. Curtis Payne 
accepted the land for the city 
from Rear Adm. Roy G. 
Anderson, commandant of the 
Fifth Naval District, in 
ceremonies Friday in 
Richmond. 



screening committee. The 
Forum membership and 
interested persons heard 12 of 21 
candidates for ttie May election 
speak at meetings March 26 and 
April 2. Candidates appearing 
before the group included Reid 
Ervin, John Griffin (Lynnhaven 
Borough), Garland Isdell, Dr. 
Henry McCoy (Kempsville 
Borough), Gaynette Winter 
(Bayside Borough) and at-large 
hopefuls Peter Joy, Patrick 
Standing, Phillip Muldez, Joel 
Smith, Edward Lynk, Cecily 
MacDonald and John Atkinson. 

MR. ATKINSON did not 
return either of the Forum's 
questionnaires or attend an 
interview. He told the group he 
was not interested in their 
endorsement because he did not 
consider them a non-partisan 
organization. He and Mr. 
Griffin accused the Forum of 
being biased toward Vice- 
mayc»- Reid Ervin. 

The Forum's candidates 
screening committee included 
Jack Jennings, Elsie Belcher, 
Bob Battaglia, Sol Kaplan, Dee 
Dee Rockefeller and Ken Slye. 
Sam Houston Sr., who was to be 
a member of the, committee, 
"was removed" because he did 
not attend any meetings, 
according to committee 
chairman Jack Jennings. 

"A Forum on Growth" is 
scheduled for Tuesday at 7:80 
p.m. at Princess Anne High 
School. Representatives (tf the 
building industry and City 
Councilman Robert Callis will 
discuss the Beach growth 
problem . 



Hearing set for 
Birdneck project 



A publie tearing will be held 
Monday <m plans for the 
propose improvements of 
North Bii^wck Road. 

The imilug will be conducted 
by the iMbifa Department of 
H^V9ifi% 8 p.m. at Seata(* 
Etem^tl^ School, 411 N. 

has requested the 

of Birdnedc as 

TOPICS (Traffic 

Pribram to 

idty and Safety) 

improvements 

ee te prtaen t two u- 

Mfnc tones with four 

lanes, divided by a 

feur to 16 feet wide. 

'fURN lanes will be 

at all intersections 

ttMK at Miller and 

I^KS. 

_^ Mffic vdume on the 

■1 900 1,000 ^wfaicles. It is 

^ to be 16,000 vehicle 

b Jlite. The city cwisiders 

t inadequate for 

■td {Mvjected traffic. 

„ nuitniction wouM 

roMi trtmi ji»t north 

Norf^k Southern 

to Laskio Soad. 

B^ch Boulevard 

kt improved at iU 

ritb N«^h 



■A^ MUWDMSaad otter 

" itetoe 




director of community services 
in the administration building in 
the municipal center at 
Princess Anne. 

Highway department 
representatives will be 
available Monday from 4:30 to 
6:30 p.m. ai. Seatack School to 
answer questions and review 
material for the public. 

Writt^ and (ral statements 
may be iresented at the hearing 
or to the Virginia Department (A 
Highways up to 10 days after the 
hearing. 



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that prevents clogging of 
septic tanks and cesspools 
with but a single, ssfe and 
easy-to-use yearly treat- 
ment, has been developed 
by the FX-Lab Co., Living- 
ston, N. J. 

Sluggish systems and 
drainfields can also be re- 
stored to norma! by fast 
acting bacterial cultures. 

They are also recomr 
mended as a "starter" to 
seed newly cleaned out or 
newly installed septic tanks 
afad, cesspools. 



rial ot^anisms, known as 
FX-4 for septic tanks, FX- 
7 for cesspools, and FX-11 
for sluggish septic tanks 
and cesspools are available 
locally. 

Available also, is a free 
booklet "The Story of Willie 
Bacteria, or How To Take 
Care of Your Septic Tank 
or Cesspool" from: 

FUEL. FEED 
BUILDING SUPPUES 

CORP. 
1818 Pacific Ave. 
Vir^Bcadi.Va. 



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mth Thi$ AJ and Any PurcftoM 



double "G" enterprises; 

ITHT A, Va. lU-arh liivd, 11^5-129:? ^ 




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MAY 7th VOTi 



i^Avttof^ef t.r.&BM, f^vMovr 



JOEL SMITH 



HE CARES ABOUT VA. BEACH! 

HE HAS BEEN INVOLVED! 

HE NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT. 
If you would Ilk0 to hmlp 
pononally, call 340-6423 

or Mrrlfo ....... joil SMITH 

3412 Bo^ M. 
Vt.BMdi.Va.23«2 



^ 



NEW 

ADVERTISING RATES 

CLASSIFIED & RETAIL DISPLAY 

$2.52 

per column inch 

NO CONTIIACr NiCiSSARY 
rHoctivo Jan. 9. 1974 

Ci^lilatioii 18,000 to 25,000 weekly 
Minimum circulation 18,000 weekly 

"it pays to ad¥ortts« 
In Tho Sun" 

CALL 4M-34M TODAY 1 
A» fOm ADVMffWIWa 




TOP SALESMAN 

MARCH 1974 

CLELLE QUINLIVAN IS ONE OF - 
THE REAL PROS AT STOHL 
REALTY - SHE SPECIALIZES 
IN RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY 
CALL HER TO SELL YOURS 

OFFICE 497-4851 HOME 497-3248 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginia Beach Blvd. at Aragona Blvd. 



GOMER 
PYLE 



\\ 



5:30 PM 




WEEKDAYS 



Cf ty of Virginia Beach 

Easter Holiday 
Refuse Collection Schedule 




Due to the Monday, April 15, 1974 
holiday, no garbage collection will be made on 
that day. Monday's collection route will be 
picked-up on Thursday, April 11, 1974 and 
Thursday, April 18, 1974. Regular collection 
schedule will resume on Monday, April 22, 
1974. Only Monday's collection route will be 
affected by the holiday. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

PROPOSED HIGHWAY PROJECT 
NORTH BIRDNECK ROAD 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEMIH 

A Location and Design Public Hearing will be held by a 
representative of the Virginia Department of Highways on 
April 15, 1974, at 8: 00 P.M., In the Seatack Elementary School 
located at 411 North Birdneck Circle In Virginia Beach, for 
the pwj^e of considering the proposed location and design 
of I^W^irdneck Road from 0.294 mUt south of Virginia 
Boulevard (Business Route 58) to the Intersection of Laskln 
Road (Alternate Route 58) in the City of Virginia Beach. 

All interested parties are urged to atterat and ^Ive the 
Department the benefit of ttwir comments and suggestioas 
relative to the proposed highway Improvement. 

Maps, drawings, an environmental declaration and other 
information are available for public review a«d copying In 
the Department of Highways District C^fice located on Rwrte 
440 just north of Suffolk, In its Residency Office located at the 
intersection of te|»ness Route 13 and Route 168 In the City of 
Qiesapeake awrw fhc office of the Director of Commwity 
Services for the dt^of Virginia Beach. 

RepresHitatlves of the Department will also be present In 
the SeatKk Elementary School from 4:30 to 6:30 P.M. on the 
evening of the p\M\c hearing, for In^mal viewing of 
available Informatlw by Interested persons. 

Writton statements and other exhibits relative to the 
proposed project may be presented in place of ;«r in addition 
to, oral statements at tt» hearing. Such writNn statoments 
Md eidilblts may also be submitted to ttte Department of 
■rtghways at any time within ten days after the- public 
hearing. 

At this location wid design puWIe hcwli^, relocation 
assistance programs and tentative schedules for right of May* 
acquMlton and censtructlon will also be discwssed. 

Sta#c Highway 

0)mmi»h» of 

VIrgMa 



<. 



» 

Sun rises 
for Easter 



Some nf the congregati<m came in Um jrans 
:ind some in Raster finery for Easter sunrise 
sorvlces at the Cape Henry Memorial Cross at 
Ft sforv. They gathered on the danes under a 
rros«$-tike utility pole as the sun made its first 
'wsitant appearance in the clouds. It burst out 
ill snnnv splendor fust as the Virginia Beach 
Civic Chorus finished the last refrains of "The 
Ihllelujah Chorus" from Handel's Messiah. 
The \rmv. Navy and Chamber of Commerce 
lomhiiiod efforts for Sunday's 47th annual 
sorvlco. (Son photo by Rod Mann) 



Where The 
AetUfu Ul 

Sati danifMi 

For Pfenon to Pawn S«r- 
vice, CALL 48»>S438, 
486-3434 



49th Year No. 16 



Circulation 21,000 




SUNBEAMS 



"lite Sun is the only newspaper I take at 
home. It really covers the Beach."-C.K., 
Kempsville 

"I really like your new features. The Sun 
gets better and better every week /'-B.L., 
Lyni^aven 

"All my busmess is in the Beach. I have 
to read The &io to know what's happening 
here."-S.R.. Bayskle i 

For homeitettvery phoae 486-3430 




around 
atiAfork 



■Page A-10 



Bayside 
ends Chief 



wi 



in strealc 

Page A-7 




SPRING TIME is wedding time. If there's 
a w«Wing in ymir future, tl« bridal 
planning informatiOTi in the two-page bridal 
section may help ;..Pages B-2 and B-3. 

ECO PROBE I. a science happening for 
area hi|^ school students, is all day 
Saturday at Plaza Junior High School, 
There will be exhibits, lectures, films and 
much more.. ..Page A-3 

CANCER WEEK in Virginia Beach 
begins Friday. It's an all-out campaign to 
sdicit funds and inform the public about the 
work of the American Cancer 
Society Page A-6 

"THE MUSIC I^AN" will bring his "76 
Trombones" tt> , both Bayside and 
Kempsville Higlr Schools Thursday 
and Saturday while the Little Theatre opens 
the suspenseful "Wait UntU Dark" Friday 
night Page B-1 

\ HOUSE-TO-HOUSE school survey 
starts Monday to help plan for future school 
needs as weU as streets, recreation, utilities 
and other city needs Page A-6 

Inside 

aai^fied B^ 

Comment ^"2 

^Mbiras » • ^"^ 

Qentoning • • •• ""^ 

Life ^es • B-1 to B4 

DmI JEttat'^ ,.,...•.««•«•••■."•••• •"» 

fWiflDn • f^ 

a_JL ... A-7 to M 
spons ,«.«...••.•■«»• ...M ••• • "^ • •" "^^ ^ 



Wednesday, April 17. 1974 



City of Virginia Baadi, Va. 



Q copyright 1974 
BMCh Publlining Corp. 



15 Cents 



Student transfer 
controversy ends 



The controversy over transferring secondary 
students from the Ridglea-Point of View areas of 
Kempsville to Bayside High School in the fall has 
apparently been resolved to the satisfaction of 
die parents involved. 

After the Virginia Beach School Board 
approved the redrawing <rf schod attendance 
boundaries in February, Rldglea and Print of 
View parents objected because their cjiildren 
would be bused to Bayside High School rather 
than attend neighborhood Kempsville High 
Schod. . 

ThebouiSdaries'wt^ redrawn b) rt^eve ower- 
ciwdhrg in the seci***3r'ie*eite«nd t« fIB 
three new junior high fchods sdwtbited to open 
thisfaU. i ; 

THE PARENTS formed an organization, the 
Ridglea-Point of View Concerned Citizens 
Gamp, and met with NorfoUt attwney Marshall 
Bohannon to investigate the possibility of going 
to court, if necessary, to prevent their children 
from being transferred to Bayside. 

The School Board heard a recommendatiion 
Tuesday that the boundary changes approved in 
February remain as originally approved. 

Robert P. Stenzhorn, director of adjustive 
services, told the Board that his office had met 
with the citizen's group and their attori^ 
several times. He said his office could offer them 
no alternative to the transfer. 

HE SAm that the citizens group conducted a 
neighbffl-hood survey on the number of students 



who would be h-ansferred and infwmed his office 
of the survey results. 

Figures supplied from the parents' surv^ 
and figures from his office were almost 
identical, he told the Board. The figures were 
slightly different, he said, due to the mobile 
nabire of the neighborhoods. 

George Bunch, co-chairman df the citizens 
group, said Mmiday there is "i»o way" the group 
wouM now c(»isider going to court. 

"Wemet with Mr.Stenzhorn, and he explained 
the problesj to. us," Mr. BunChsa^i^It made 
sense to us." '^. 

« IteolW'ii^ sttkl»BM are exewifrfWm the 
transfer. Mr. StenzhlS-n told the boafd that 
almost all seniors In Rit^l^ and Point of View 
indicated they would remain atKempsvilie High 
in the fall to finish their schoding. 

IN OTHER BUSINESS Tuesday, the School 
Board heard a report from architect William 
McClurg of the McClurg and Wall architectural 
firm on the status of the construction at the new 
Princess Anne, Independence and Lynnhayen 
Junior Hi^ Schools. 

The thi^ schools should be ready by the 
be^ning ol the fall term, he said. 

Independence and Lynnhaven schools should 
be finished by Aug. 15, Mr. Wall reported, and 
administrative personnel should be able to move 
in by June 1. Princess Anne school should be 
read^ by June 15 with administrative offices 
fin»hed by May 1. 






WINTER 



HOLLAND 



WATERPIELD 







UMELL 



MCCOY 



ERVW 



GRIFFIN 



Arts gtoups sigh relief 
after insurance mix-up 



The$l milliwi insurance hubbub invdving the 
Virginia Beach Arts and Humanities 
Commission and the dty schods was apparently 
all a misunderstanding. 

The tempest in a teapot began peiicing when 
Dr. Milton Saunders, president of tiie Virginia 
Beach Civic Symphony (a memb«" of the 
commission) tdd commission members in 
March ttiat his group could not perf(»in at Plaza 
Junior High School unless it secured $1 million in 
liabihty insurance required by the schoob. 

It picked up steam when Dr. Saunders said 
that apparently all arts groups in the 
aanmission would be required to have the $1 
million coverage to use the schools. 

COMMISSION MEMBERS were to 
investigate the possibilities of having a Uaiftet 
policy for $1 million drawn up to covct aU the 
arts grmips. Most of the groups in ttte 
CO '•-.uMjion carry their own liability pdides but 
in le^er amounts than $1 inilllon,'/ 

However, the schods io not require that 
amount d insuraiKe frmn groiqffi wing the 
schods, said Jim S(feicer, who overwea non- 
schod use d school Ixiildinp. 

"W^re certain^ not tryu^ to hinder the arte 
groups in any w^," Mr. Spencer explained, 
"but we feel the public nwds protectioa" 



He said that the schods require only $100,000- 
$300,000 maximum in bodily ii^ury coverage and 
$50,000 in i»*operty damage. The coverage is 
required d ai^ group which holds a fund-raising 
meeting or performance open to the public, he 
said. 

GR(HJPS HOLDING regular meetingiB not 
open to ttie public, such as civic league meeting 
or Girl Scout meetings, are nd required to have 
the insurance, he said. 

He explained Uut a very short-term liability 
policy could be written for a one-time 
performance at nominal cost. A local insurance 
firm estimated an overnight policy could be 
written for $»). 

Although no one seons to know how the $1 
miUlOT figure came up, Mr. Spencer said the 
schools thanselves carry ttut amount in liability 
coverage for public events, such as fodball 
pmea. 

Dr. Saunters tdd commissian memben at^ 
last ^fttk'n meeting that tecurii« tiw $160,000- 
$300,000 tasuriaii^oveoge would probaWy not 
be a prddem fa- the arts graupi. 

The commiisiM it stiU cditetnpiating having 
8(Hne type d blanket pdiQr written to assure 
adecpiate coverage for all arts groups. 



Countdown to coimcM 

Borough candidates 
list election priorities 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun staff Writer 

When the voters go to the polls for the 
Virginia Beach City Council election this 
May, they may select from seven candidates 
running for the four borough seats up for 
grabs. 

Candidates seeking a borough sea( Include 
Dr. Clarence Hdland and Gaynette Winter 
(Bayside); Garland Isdell and Dr. Henry 
McCoy (Kempsville) ; F, Reid Ervinand John 
Griffin (Lynnhaven); and Floyd Waterfield 
(unopposed for the Pungo seat). Vders are 
eligible to vote for one candidate frmn each 
bormigh, regardless of the bo-ough in which 
they reside. 

Each d the borou^ h<q)efula was 
interviewed concerning his (or her) first 
priorities and why l^e (or she) is better 
qualified to serve on the Council than his (or 
her) q)ponent. Candidates were also 
(|^estiorMd<on other campaign iMues. 

GAYNETTE WINTER am^ incumbent Dr. 
Clarence Hdland, who are running for the 
Bayside seat, both list controlled growth as 
their first priorities. Dr. Holland proposes no 
ftirther moratoriums but Iwan the adoption 
d regulations and ordinances to enforce a 
|dan for the futwe. Ms. Winter wanU a land 
use plan with a timetable lot development, 
inchiding acquisition d open space. 

Both candiitatef want to see city water and 
sewer extended to serve all residents. Dr. 
Holland 'Svould allow new construption in the 
dty if the developer puts in Ore services. 
Older neigMMM-hoods would get water and 
sewer by u^« the city's bortding capacity. 
Ms. Winter wants to see water and sewer in 
the oWer ndghbwhoods bdosf there is 
.ftirUi«- expansim d the dty. ' 

Dr. Hdland and Ms. Winter both favor 
investigition d a monorail transit system for 
the city but agree buses are the only 
financialiy feasible method d mi»s transit at 



•Series 



Thii flnt article of a two-part uHet by Sun 
Staff Writer Undo MUler examines the pro- 
grami and platformi of the uven candldatet 
far four borough teati on the Virglnk Beach 
aty CouncIL Next week's article will focus on 
tite thirteen at-large candidates. 



this time. Dr. Holland says he would vote for 
funds for rail transit after a study showed it 
could be justified. Ms. Winter calls for the 
establishment d a regional transit authority 
and would put the funding d a monorail 
system to a referendum if other cities in the 
authority would agree to do the same. 

CONCERNING THE problem with 
substandard housing in the dty, both 
candidates favor establishment of a housing 
authority to develop more low-cost housing in 
the city, as well as encouragement of private 
builders and ctnritabie organizations to 
jrovide that housing. Dr. Holland says he 
believes before s«K:h an authority could be 
established it would have to be put to a vder 
referendum. 

Ms. Winter says she will be more accessible 
to the people than Dr. Hdland. Dr. Hdland 
counters with the fact that he has a 24-hour 
answa-ing service which ai^one may call. 

Dr. HoUand, 44, has held the Bayside 
B(»-ough seat since 19!9. He has served on the 
eMeu^e board d the Southeastern Virginia 
Planning District. He has a frivate medical 
practice in the Bayside Borough. 

Ms. Winter, 33, is public relations director 
for the Norfolk Theatre Center. She has 
revived the endorsement of the Vindnia 
Beach Forum, and PACE, a teaiiiers 
organization called ttie Political Action 
Cnnmittee for Education. t / 



IN THE KEMPSVIULE 

(See COUNTDOWN. 




race 



Navy to build houses at Ft Stoiy 



It's full steam ate^ f<Mr tte U.S. Navy's cm- 
structkm (rf 600 hoittii^ units m Ft. Story Army 
Ba^. 

R^ Admiral A.W. Walton, &mmaudi»<i ttie 
Atlarttic ^vision Naval FwiUties Engtaeertag 
Commaiy T«d the Virgima Beadi Qty CountU 
Monday that ttailecision to l«ald tte Navy hoiBing 
at Ft. Story wai "fcwroaiWe." He saM evw with 
the new cora^etoi, tbe Navy will tave a 1^0 
housii^ unit storage. He pitmised, howeiwr, ttiat 
m fvrVh^ housing castration would td^ friace at 
Ft. Staty tner &3imf^km ^ tte cn^iaal eoo units. 

I^Hgh trmtr^gA becaise tbey had been m- 
t^eesstii in haM^ «^MiKtta cf il the Navy 
boosing rt Ft. Story, the Councfl aiprened relitf 



and aiHn^iation that m additional housing would 
be built. 

The Council-has been negotiati^ wiUi the Navy 
for two months to g^ Uie Ft. Story c«»toiction 
moved to another site in tte city. The city opposed 
tlM coistr\K:tion because tst envirmm^tal effects 
on adjacent Sea^Mre State Park and the over- 
burdoiii^ <rf city wate- and sewer service. Many 
coonrUmen also believe tint ttie Army wiH abanJkxi 
tbe baM in the futwe, and they would IUk to have 
tiK land UaneA into a park. 

REP. G. WILLIAM WWWwrst (R-Va), who 
was atao at M«Mkiy's metita^, told the CoweU he 
iMtt beai ta «iirt«:t Witt tte ^(T^aiy <rf the Army . 
He said Uicon^^kraU(n iiufc»ted that the Army 



has cmitiming need of the ba^ for amphibious 
training. He achkd the Navy has no furttio- {dans 
for Ft. St<ry. % 

The CwncU had (tffered the Navy full lae <rf the 
city's Plannir^ Dejartenent and maps to locate an 
alternate site, btrt the Navy said they made a full 
survey (rf tte area brfore deciding on the 80 acres at 
Ft. Siwy. 11*^ coTBidered 16 otha- si^ in the 
ar«i, hut Uie Ft. Story site was the only cm Onsy 
dean«} f^sable, acontUng to Atbn. Waltcm. 

Adm, Walton said that fw futiffe constrwOon of 
tte 3,500 houptag wite tte Navy woidd k>ok to St. 
Julwns Cr^t in Paismouth and, when brik are 
taken (rff tbe Hampton Rxads Brit^e Tu^, to 
fede^ |V(V«ty in Ymttown. 



§ 




Page A-2-The Sun-Wedn«day, April 17, 1974 



4iw«tB 



*- -ir 



An editorial: 

Opening college 



College cost continue to rise, 
according to a survey, by the College 
Entrance Examination Board, 
which conceded that the tuition 
pinch isthe most painful tothe middle 
income familj^ cut off froin 
scholarship or .loan assistance based 
,, on financial need. 

But the budget crunch that spurs 

the tuition spiral may also promise 

some relief to struggling students 

and their parents. 

Sagging enrollments at many 
'.. private schools are a direct result of 

educational costs that in many cases 
' have been pushed beyond $5,000 a 

year — an expense weighed 
, carefully by even the more affluent 
- families. 

\ND THI^SE institutions, faced 
" not only with the likelihood of empty 
. classrooms, but with declining 
-■ academic reputations, are reviving 
'the concept of scholarshif^ based on 

merit instead of documented need. 

The Wall Street Journal reported 

' recently that a number of prestigious 

. universities and colleges — 

convinced, apparently, that half a 



loaf is 



better 



than none 



— are 
waiving portions of the tuition 
charge Icfv studaits wit>j a record of 
academic achievement. 

CONGRE^, TQO. has 
acknowledged the financial 
pressures on ih& middle-income 
family in moves to make 
govenmentfSubsidized and 
guaranteed loans more accessible. 

Proposals before a House-Senate 
conference would eliminate (woof of 
need as a requirement in approving 
loans to students from families 
earning less than $15,000. The needs 
test also would be waived for all 
loans under $1,500. 

There is some dango*, of course, 
that the more benevolent policies for 
the middle-income student could dry 
up the funds available for those in 
desperate need. A judicious 
approach is essential. 

Still, the new concern for the 
student on the center nmg of the 
income ladder could not only ease 
his financial plight, but could help 
bring a healthier balance to the 
nation's campus population. 



-7 ha¥9 the fee^g that things an comktg ummvehd'^ 




^ 




' f 



CHyside 

BvUndaimhtr 

Doctors are out 
in Forum's mind 



Playing the old one potato-two potato game 
might be a better way to select a candidate to en- 
dorse than the methods some groups in the city 
have iteed to pick "their" candidates. 

Everyone has their reasons for wanting to en- 
dorse a particular candidate for the upcoming 
Virginia Beach City Council election. At the 
Virginia Beach Forum two wedcs ago, members of 
the Forum's candidates screening committee were 
asked why they were pushing the five candidates 
they selected. Unfortunately, they had more 
reasons (some perhaps valid) for not endorsing a 
candidate than they did for selecting the candidates 
they chose to support. 

"Garland Isdell cares about the whole person," 
said one screening committee meml)er concerning 
the candidate endorsement for the Kempsville 
Borough. "Dr. (Henry) McCoy only looks in your 
mouth from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. everyday. What does he 
know?" 

The same Forum member also spoke out against 
endorsement of Dr. Clarence Holland in the 
Bayside Borough. 

"The only way you can get in touch with Dr. 
Holland is to catch pneumonia," she said. 

Actually, it was hard to tell whether she wanted 
to endorse candidates or if she just has something 
against doctors. 



MAYOR ROBERT Cromwell and his run- 
ningmate Councflman Murray Malbon, who are 
both bidding for re-election to the CoimcO's two at- 
large seats, haven't been showing up at any of the 
"meet the candidates sessions" that have been held 
around the city. And, their advertisements in local 
media might lead one to believe that they are doing 
something other than campaigning for election to 

the City Council. 

As I flipped past one (rf their ads last week which 

read "Men <rf Experience," I thought it was a 
pi;omotion fw a new movie in town. &U, then I 
noticed the "stars" were "CromwelwlRHbon." 



»»<i»<^**** 



#% 



^»E CITY staff went to the barpining tables 
not too long ago and (believe it or not) saved the 
taxi»yers $110,000 on a local road construction 
project. , ; ,^ 

After n^otiations with the low bidder (Aqihalt 
Br(rthers!C<jftetruction) for the Providence R<»d 
coiKtrwtion work, the city talked the bill down 
flrom $l,sr^ to $1,247,000. The conshwUon will 
go from Ken^yjille Road to the Inta-state 64 un- 
derpass on Prudence Road. 

Councilman iQeoi^ FerreU, delighted with the 
savinp, told the staff he thmight maybe ttie city 
should "n^otiate all the contracts if it's goii% to 
save us that much mot^y." 




OAVIORDEAR 



•OW^ L£A OUIAKER 



JAMES C eiKNVN 




Health care 



Federal legislation now provides 
new directions for quality health 
services. If the 1973 Health Main- 
tenance Organization Act can be 
put into effect, there promises to 
be cheaper and better medical at- 
tention available nationwide. 



yun 

An Iwi^emdent NmB»p»p» 

STAN MAnriN l«AL BRITTON SIMS 

sEdsttx 



MMX HMUfNING OMMMATION 



M«i*BM*,Viipnu 



_— By THOMAS N.PERLOFF 

Special to The Sun 

On Dec. 29, 1973 President Nbcon signed into law 
the Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Act 
of 1973. Thi§ important act not only encourages the 
HMO approach to care but also signals new 
directions for health care delivery in this country. 
In general terms, an HMO is an attempt to create a 
system of care through specified corporate con- 
figurations, usually a team of doctors working in 
concert. Instead of the individual trying to weave 
his own way through the health care labyrinth, the 
HMO accepts the responsibility of organizing a 
health care system for him. In exchange, the 
patient agrees to receive his care exclusively 
through this specified system, and, of course, 
guarantees payment on a periodic basis. 

The encouragement of these HMOs is in itself an 
extremely important riew policy decision. In the 
first place, existing HMOs, such as the California- 
based Kaiser Health Plan, have shown themselves 
to be extremely cost-effective mechanisms for 
providing care. Secondly, the existence of such 
organized systems encourages new public poUc^in 
areas such as quality assurance, where order is 
necessary before any effective legislative action 
can be taten. Lastly, o-ganized systems, whether 
built on group or individual practices will finally 
give the consumer someone to hold accountable for 
the quality and accessibility of the care he is 
receiving. 

THE HMO ACT (rf 1973 is doubly iinportant 
because it sctvos as a harbinger of new directions 
for national poUcy with regard to health care 
delivery. The very use of the term "health main- 
tenance organization" in conbrast to the usual 
illnras oriented systems of financing and providing 
care is a prime example (rf this. An HMO is en- 
c(Miraged to maintain patient health because it can 
retain any financial savings resulting from the 
judicious use of its sa^aces. This, the HMO is 
particularly concerned with immunizations, 
periodic checkups and, thrcxigh health education, 
making the patient aware of his own obligation to 
keep^ell. Certainly, the HMO is no panacea, but it 
is at least an organized effort to emphasize certain 
qualities that have beoi lacking in traditional 
American medi(»l in^ctice. 

A second new direction indicated by this act is 
tte mandatiwy comjffehensiveness (rf benefits to be 
provi(te3'. The importance of ttiis is demonstrated 
by the similarly comphrehensiire benefits list in the 
Nixon aAninistration's Comprdiensive Health 
Insurance Proposal. This signifies a movement 
toward the implementation of the oft-quoted 
priiKiplra that "health care is a right" and away 
from the concept that health insurance is only a 
mechanism for spreading the financial risks of 
illness. Some of the benefits are parti(nilarly in- 
ter^tittg b^^use they extend coverage to such 
thinp ds, home and skilled nursing care. Other 
hearts, imp(»1ant because they broaden the 
concept, include preventive dentistry and 
jx^ventive health. Firally, this man datory coni- 
prehoisive benefits package is importantT)ecaise, 
through competition, it will brii^ decisive chaise 
in otl^ types of health care insurance coverage. 

A 11IIRD NEW^licy dire(Hion illusti^ted in tiie 
Act a(klresses the pr(rf)lem (rf ec^itable distribution 
(rf todth care services by recpnring each and evary 
HMO to have an open eivollment period. A key 
reason for tiM marked financial succe^ (rf existing 
HMOs is that they have hem able to resti-ict their 
services to the rdaUvely young, gainfully em- 



pToyod and generally healthy populations. This Aft 
says that since the HMO approach works for part of 
the populatton, it must now be applied to all of it. 
Some qualifying terms in the legislation will allow 
an HMO to avoid this responsibility for a while, but 
it. is clear that the intention of the act is that the 
broad spectrum of the population be equally ser- 
ved; 



n<mm N. Ferioff * aaoemte ^ecWt of Ae l^n^l- 
tmUa Urbm He^Oi Ser¥ke$ Cento; a model htdth est 
Mtmy tyttem tffl^ted with. Ae UtOrtnity of Nniayl- 
ttrnk'i Gmcbtate Hoi^M ^ 



Certainly, it is a large step from the enunciation 
(rf a new national poBcy to its actual im- 
plemaitation ti)roi%h(Nit the combry, Init the HMO 
Act (rf I9f73 c(»tains the jM^mise (rf new awl exciting 
devel(qnients. Hie mm now is m those who believe 
tint th^e new con^^ diouki be imi^mrat^, to 
(xtnre that tt^ era Meed be wed to des^ ah 
entirely new health care delivery system tar 210 
miUion Americans. We are «ite4i^ an siting 
time in l^lth rare delivery and perhaps the ab- 
so^e of the vbmI vmmMc rh^mto about a poHcy 
rev(riuti(m will in iteelf he^ this impcxrtant 
re^Krfusion take {riace. 




Another interesting feature of the Act requires 
all employers of 25 or more persons to offer their 
employees a dual choice. That is, to choose between 
a traditional health insurance policy and a certified 
HMO-type policy. The significance here is that it 
now l)ecomes a matter of policy for the individual to 
choose which type of health care delivery system he 
will use. Thus, the power of established medical 
societies or special interest groups to restrict in- 
dividual choice is being overridden by public 
policy. Advocates (rf the HMO approach think this 
will greaUy increase their market penetration even 
though there are rigid standards as to what is a 
federally certified HMO. 

THE LAW ALSO re(iuires that each HMO be 
concerned with quality m specified ways and calls 
for the Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare to establish special studies in this area. 
This new emf^asis should help insure a proper 
utilization of health services and encourage efforts 
to develop and demonstrate new approaches to 
improving the quaUty of care. H(^fully, the ten- 
dency to think of quality only in terms of dollars 
saved will be avoided, and instead, the prime focus 
will he on maintainance of uidividual health. 

Contained in this Act is an explicit emphasis on 
health education. Alth(Migh national policy has 
rec(^ized the need for increased emphasis on 
patient health education thr(H]gh a national com- 
mission on the subject, this is the fu^t clear in- 
dication that somethmg is l>eing done about it. It 
should be noted that this emphasis on education 
logically foOows the primary concern for main- 
taining health rather than just b-eating illness. In 
the past, healUi education was the concur) of no one 
in particular and consec|uently was a concern (rf no 
one at all. Now, many exciting new afpFoectes 
such as the use of pro^ammed learning and other 
audio-visual technicpies will be encouraged. 



THE LAST NEW dtoection foreshadowed by 
this Act is tlK^^(%niti(m (rf the role (rf the coor 
sumer in directing the delivery system. The HMO 
Act insists that at least one-third (rf any HMO board 
must be composed of patients. Although u# Unit«l 
States has gone through numerous corsumer crises 
in the last dec«le, this is the first indication of a 
policy change in consumer partici{»tion in a 
program directed to the total populati(m and not 
just poverty groups. Apin, such accountability is 
only p(»sible whoi the h«dth care system has total 
responsibility for maintaining health and 
oi^anizing the (telivery system. Wh^er the 
mandated consumer representation will 
dramatically change the style or cwitent (rf the 
delivery systems remains to be seen, twt as a 

portent (rf new dSrediom in policy, it is clearly_a Lr 

momentous event. ' 



Hidings 

By 

"NeaX 
Sims 

Sun Editor 

Slf^rtics report 
on Councffrace 



For the past three weeks, members of the 
Skeptics and Scalp 'Em Committee have be«i as 
busy as the candidates running for Virginia Beach 
City Council seats. You'll recall that the committee 
was formed just after the fiUng deadline for the 
election with the purp<»e of rendering impartial 
judgments on the activities and platfornK of the 
candidates. ^ 

With that pretense, our committee is similar to 
th6 Virginia Beach Forum — another "impartial" 
group dedicated to the proposition that all can- 
didates are insignificant next to Reid Ervin. 
Actually, Skeptics and Scalp 'Em is concerned only 
with injecting a little fun into the business we 
sometimes take too seriously — politics. 

Our first reports this week center on the race 
for the two at-large seats. John T. AUtinson was tiie 
first casualty of the campaign, having to witiidraw 
because of pressing business needs. He'll still get 
more votes than Sandy Bolin, a furniture store 
owner who has not been seen since early March. 

THE TWO INCUMBENTS. Robert Cromwell 
aiid Murray Malbon, better known to committee 
members as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 
also have been absent at sessions where candidates 
have been invited to speak. If their constituency is 
as prompt on voting day, the pair might be in for a 
shock. 

One top challenger, Patrick Standing, is using 
rape as a campaign issue, calling for special 
measures to prevent the crime and «i8e the siS- 
fering ofihe victim. So far, no one has opposed him 
on the subject. 

Edward Lynk, a Goldwater conservative, has 
received the endorsement of Forum and says he 
would welcome a similar statement from the SPCA. 
One skeptic laughingly reported that Mr. Lynk has 
found a solution to the mass transit pr(^lem — 
bomb the highways. 

THREE FEMALE CANDIDATES are having 
difficulties with their campaign promotions. 
Meyera Obemdorf can't get her entire name on 
bumperstickers, so she had to settle for "Meyera 
for Me." Her pin-on buttons are a full two inches in 
diameter. Reba McClanan, wife of Del. Glenn 
McClanan, could save some expenses by using 
some of her husband's left*over stickers. 

Cecily Macdonald • in an effort to ensure ttiat her 
campaign literature does not become litter, l»s 
printed a recipe on ohe side. "Dump Cake," as the 
dish is named, calls for pineapples, cherry pie fill- 
ing and walnuts. The dessert for her election day 
meal could well be a taste ^of defeat. 

IN THE RACE for the Lynnhaven seat, 
challenger John Griffin has been furiously at- 
tacking incumbent Reid Ervin without offering any 
concrete proposals of his own. Whai a reporter 
recenUy asked Mr. Griffin for his three prioriti^ if 
elected, following a long pause he replied, "I'm late 
for a business appointment." 

Dr. Henry McCoy, chairman of the Tidewater 
Community College Board, is sti-essing eclucation 
as a campaign issue. Strangely enough, PACE 
(Political Action Committee on Education) 
recommended his opponent. Garland IsdeU, for 
election. 

In Uie Bayside Borough, Gaynette Winter has 
accused incumbent Dr. Clarence Holland of being 
inaccessible. But he says he has an answering 
service and doesn't make house calls. 

Election day is less than three wetks away, and 
the only unconcerned candidate is Fungo Coun- 
cilman Floyd Wateriield. He is unopposed. In an 
earlier column, skeptics asked if anyone else lived 
in Pungo. We are glad to report that since then, 
three messengers on horseback have assured the 
committee that Mr. Wateriield (k)es have neigh- 
bors. 

Meeting adjourned. Smile all the way to the 
polls. 



How tosabseribe 



the 




yun 



Many of our readers firefer to get 
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mall. 

If you with The Sun to te mwled 
weekly to your home or business, mail 
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Circulation Diipt. , 

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Address 




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mMmm.mHmKmmimr^sj^-if^-i*!' 



t^tmmmmmum^if:^s^a».M^fl- 



HASSLES 




Hendrick 

Fating to win 
tfte bulge battle 

Picture in your mind a large, cdf peted room. On 
the floor, imagine about 30 women drrased in form- 
fitting leotards and tights. Under the leotards and 
tights, picture Ixilges and other unhappy signs of 
ovwweight. 

Picture the 30 women lying on their badcs on the 
cati)et, arms stretched out^ l^s straight out in 
frmt elevated six inches off the floor. 

Picture what is happening to the women's 
stomach muscles as they hold that position. 

Inlagine you hear moans, groans, grunts and 
other sounds of strain as a young, lithe thing in a 
leotard at the front of the room shouts, "Alright 
ladies, hold it.. .longer. .hold it! You can do it! It 
isn't helping unless it hurts!" 

PUT ALL THESE pictures together and yeu 
have a good id^ of what goes on in my group 
exercise class each day. But don't feel sorry for the 
wonrreh in tte class. We asked for this kind (rf 
treatment. 

Every one of us willingly signed ourselves over 
tothebkercise in^ructors, who are mostly young, 
attractive and ex-gymnasts. 

They can do things God never meant m<»t 
bodies to do. They can sit on the floor, back 
straight, legs spread wide, and touch their heads to 
the floor while bending from the waist. Most of us, 
on the other hand, can't even get into that position, 
much less do all that bending and contorting. 

THE INSTRUCTORS can do incredibly hard 
exercises while counting cadence of us out-of- 
shape people. We can hardly remember to breathe 
while iMlding these insane positions while they can 
breathe, talk, count and shout while barely working 
up a gasp or two. 

I started going to the class when I added up all 
the exercise I was getting this winter and 
discovered the most energetic thing I did was brush 
my te^h. 

In the summertime, one can ride a bike, go 
swimming, go water skiing or just walk on the 
boarctwalk. It's fun, but it's also exercise. But in the 
wintertime, it's just not much fun walking in 30- 
degree weather with a 20 mile-per-hour wind. 

SWIMMING AND water skiing in the winter are 
also not recommended, although I understand those 
surfers can take it for about an hour at a time- in a 
wetsuit. 

The pr<^lem boiled down to this : I sit most of the 
day! VWiat'I sit on is getting larger and lar^r. I'm 
lazy and I won't do exercises at home by myself. 

Thesolutimi: Sign up for a group exercise thing 
that costs money. If I have to pay, I'll go. I hate 
exercise but I hate wasting money even more. 

1 AM HAPPY to report that it's woricing. Not 
only am I going to that torture regularly, I'm going 
almost every day. 

And slowly but surely, I'm winning the battle of 
the bulge. A Raquel Welch I'll never be, but I'll bet 
Raquel can't do six push-ups in a row (I can). 

Now six push-ups may not sound like much to 
you, but I couldn't do one when I started. There are 
other benefits. It used to take every ounce of 
strength I had to pedal my bike down the boardwalk 
and back, especially if there was a wind. 

NOW I THINK nothing (rf zipping up and down it 
couple of times, wind or no wind. I think nothing of 
walking the four blocks to my neighborhood park 
whereas six months ago you wouldn't catch me 
walking around the block. 

I'll never be in fantastic shape like our in- 
structors, though. One of them, after working all 
We^ leading exercise classes, goes flagging on 
Sundays "to gfet in shape," she said. This gal is in 
such good shape right now she could climb Mt. 
Everest without working up a sweat. 

Exercise is a real hassle. It's a drag and it's 
tough. 

But when they put that tape measure around 
whei£ I used to bulge, and I find out I've lost 
another, inch, it's worth all the moans, p"oans, 
aches, pain and suffering Fve gone thr(nigH. 

Hiigh sdiool students 
odf epifege preyiew 

Virginia Wesleyan College will offer three special 
courses this summer designed to help Tidewater high 
school juniws discover what college is like. 

The courses are painting and ceramics, taught by 
Barclay Sheaks. associate pr(rfcs9or of art and local 
artist; basic theatre skills, taught by Bentley Andersw). . 
instructor in theatre-communications, and humaffr ' 
analrimyand physlolt^y. taught by Dr. Laurence Ferreri, 
assistant professor of biology and chemistry. 

The summer program for juniors will t>egin June 17 
through July U. If high school students taking the cmirses 
choose to enroll at Virginia Wesleyan, the shidents will 
receive cdlege credit for their summer work. 

Cost for the summer session is WO. which covers tuition 
and lab<H-atM7 fees. Applicationsare available from high 
school guidance cwmselors or the Virginia Wesleyan 
College admissions office. 



BOLD ONES 



isru^i 



«jb 



focei 



by Hod motm 




Pinocchio found out the more he 
lied the more his nose grew. Sport- 
ing the long Pinocchio nose, Danny 
Presnell dressed as the storybook 



character for a special book week, 
celebration at Holland Elementary 
School. 




The Sun-WediMiday, April 17, 1974-^e A-3 



f 



Ecology 'happeninf^' 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun SUff Writer 

"It's Qot' just anothtr 
18-ogram. it's «n ^vironinliUil 
happening," f proclaims the 
advance publicity on Eco Probe 
I. 

Eco Probe is the first 
"happeiung" designed for area 
high school science student! 
interested in ecology and th» 
erivironinent. It takes place all 
day Saturday at Plaza JunicA- 
High School. 

About MO high school students 
from Virginia Beach, Norfdk, 
Portsmouth, Chesapeake, 
Suffolk, Hampton and Newpin-t 
News are expected to attend the 
day's schedule of lectures, "rap 
sessions" with expert speakers, 
exhibits and films. There will 
even be live music furnished by 
Count Budtwhett. 

THR I'IST OF participants 
reads like a "who's who" of 
Industry, government, 
education and science. 
Participating will be the 
Science Museum of Virginia, 
NASA, the U.S. Coast Guard, 
Ford Motor Co,, Mazda Motors, 
Sun Electric Co., Vepco, the 
If.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency, the Virginia Institute of 
Marine Sciences, the U.S. 
Forest Industry, the school 
systems (rf the area, Tidewater 
Community College and other 
state air and water pollution 
control agencies. 

Planning for Eco Probe I, 
which is envisioned as the first 
of a series of annual programs, 
started two years ago, said 
Donald Morgan, science 
supervisor tof the Virginia 
Beach public schools. 

It grew out of the anmal 
Commonwealth Pollution 
Control Workshop and Exhibits 
sponsored by the State Air 
Pollution Control Board, Mr. 
Morgan said. 

"THE WHOLE THING 

started out kind of cra^y," he 
chuckled as he related the 
beginnings of Eco Probe I. 

"I received an invitation to 
the pollution control workshop 
and found It very interesting, 
but the whole thing was geared 
to industry," he said. 

"My interest is education, 
and I didn't see much use In 
( promoting the workshop to the 
students," he explained. 




MORGAN 

After that workshop, the 
director, Fred M. Burnett III, 
called Mr. Morgan and asked 
him what could be done to 
involve students in the 
ecological workshops. 

"I told Fred to provide 
exhibits that would be 
educational and Interesting to 
the students while making them 
more ecology-minded," Mr, 
Morgan said. 

"Then he suggested that we~ 
have It at one of my Virginia 
Beach schools," he continued, 
"So I told him to get in touch 
with the principal at Plaza 
Junior." 

THUS ECO PROBE I was 

bom. Mr. Burnett Is program 
director for Saturday's student- 
oriented happening, as well as 
director for this year's 
Commonwealth Pollution 
Control Workshop scheduled for 
May 7-9 at the Cavalier 
Oceenfront. 

The finishing touches were 
put on Eco Probe I In February 
when Tidewater high school 
science supervisors met with 
Mr. Burnett at Indian River 
High School in Chesapeake for 
final discussions. 

Local science supervisors and 
college officials have been 
consulted on Eco Probe and all 
have termed It "environ- 
mentally significant," Mr. 
Burnett said In a press 
release announcing the 
happening. 

The Idea behind Eco Probe, 
Mr, Morgan said, is to make 
students more aware of their 
environment and what they can 
do to maintain its quality. 



"WE ARE TRYING to'ivail 
the students of the best 
speakers and exhibits invdved 
in the study of the 
environment," he said. 

The goals of Eco Probe are to 
make "our young people more 
aware of the air poUuticm 
problems, environment 
(rinciples, concepte, controls, 
laws,' regional activitie s An d 
technological advancement, 
control strategies and many 
other face^ of pollution control 
techniques, which we all so 
desperately' wish to 
accomplish."' states an Eco 
Probe handbook. 

Besides being informative, 
the first Eco Probe should also 
be fun, Mr. Morgan said. 

There will be a competition 
f(M- prizes, with an Ecology Flag 
going to the school with the 
ntoBt students in attendance. 
The school system first signing 
up its quota of students (only 
about 800 will fit into Plaza 
Junior'^ auditorium) will 
receive a $25 award for the 
largest ecology or science club, 

WNOR RADIO Is bringing 
Count Buckwheat to entertain 
during pn«ram breaks. And 
there will be an automobile 
exhaust emission control 
station where students may 
compare their cars' emissions 
to controlled 1974 Fords and 
Mazdas. 

If the first Eco Probe is a 
success, and Mr. Morgan 
believes it will be, then other 
Eco Probes will be planned 
annually, he said. 

"This is more or Imb a testing 
ground." he said. "We're 
already trying to think on Eco 
Probe n. 

"First we'll find out if this one 
la a success," he said, "We'll 
see how these high school 
students react to it. Then we 
may probe down into the lower 
grades and Invite the younger 
students," 



I NAMED TO OFFICE 

Frank L. Wells of Virginia 
Beach has been appointed to 
serve as a National Aide-de- 
Camp during the 75th 
anniversary (rf Uie Veterans (rf 
Foreign Wars (VFW). 

Mr, Wells is a member (rf 
V.F.W, Post 4809 of Virginia 
Beach, 



City purchases 
Industrial land^ 



The City of Virginia Beach 
Development Authority has 
purchased a 24-acre land parcel 
which will increase the size of 
Airport Industrial Park to 202 
total acres. 

The new land acquisition, 
purchased from the Virginia 
Truck and Ornamentals 
Research Stati(Hi, represents 
the largest amount of land the 
Development Authority has 
purchased for Industrial 
purposes In several years, 
according to Frank W. Rellam, 
chairman of the Authority. 

Though not a part of the 
industrial park, a second land 
parcel containing 11 acres on 
the west side of Diamond 
Springs Road was also 
purchased from the Virginia 
Truck and Ornamental 
Research Station. It will be 
available for <:ommercial use. 
(A portion of the commercial 
site is now occupied by the 
Virginia Beach Produce Market 
scheduled to be moved within 
the next five years.) 

THE DEVELOPMENT 
AUTHORITY purchased both 
parcels (35 acres total) for 
$600,000. Bids are now l)etng 
accepted for the C(»nmerclal 
site, and the Authority will sell 



it in its entirety or divide it Into 
several parcels. 

The purchase of both parcels 
was approved by the Virginia 
State Legislature during the 
1973 session. Del, Glenn, 
McClanan and former Del. B. 
R. Middleton worked with A. 
James DeBellls, director of 
economic development, to 
obtain legislature a{^roval. The 
$600,000 purchase price was 
recommended by professional 
appraisers and approved by the 
Board of the Research Station, 
the State Attorney General's 
office and the City of Virginia 
Beach Development Authority. 

Fourteen companies with an 
investment of more than $14 
millicm are pow in operation at 
Airport Industrial Park. This 
represents an agregate tax 
return to the city of $134,000, 
according to Walter N. Mford, 
industrial development 
coordinator for Virginia Beach. 

Mr. Alford says "1.1 million 
square feet of building space is 
now completed or under 
construction. Six hundred 
persons are now employed, and 
when construction is complete, 
18 to iS companies will be in 
operation in the park with a 
projected total emjdoyment of 
1,M0 persons." 



weekdays 11 PM 




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Circulation 18,000 to 25,000 weekly 
Minimum circulation 18,000 weekl| 

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In The Sun" 

CALL M4^430 TODAYI 
ASK FOR APViirriSING. 



Cecily Macdonald Challehges 
Candidates to Public Debate 




Cromviell A Malbon — 
"Come Out, Wherever You Are" 

At buge City Council Candidate Cecily Macdonald hu challenged her 

opponent! to a Public and Open Debate. 

Sunday , April 2 1 , at 8 p.m. 

Atlantic Pernnanent Savings &. Loan BIdg. 

Independence Blvd., Viri^nia Beach. 

"I would like to see the citizens of Virginia Beach be 
able to spend time questioning the candidates. Usually 
the only chance a person has to ask what is important 
to them, is at the end of a lengthy campaign speech 
and that is not enough time. There will be no speeches, 
just questions and debate." The other candidates 
running for the two at large seats have been informed 
by letter. "I am not asking them to advise me if they 
are coming...they will have to account to the citizens 
of the city, if they are not there." 



"There are 78,000 registereil 
voters in this city. In the last 
councilmatic election only 
20,000 cast their vote. This 
means only 25% of the voting 
population is deciding who is 
on city council, and that 10% 
of the population is controling 
this city. I want to see more 
people involved and voting in 
this upcoming election." 




"Iffrongiy believe that the 
people of the CHy ef Virginia 
Beach deservt a int eting with 
all the can«i|4i# who are 
running fM* tft^ two seats at 
large. They need*this tim'e to 
quHtion you and examine your 
views as compared to mine 
air%the others invohred." 



ON 
MAY 



7 VOTE Cecily Macdonald 



PAID roUTICAL ADVERTISING 



By Authority of Mary 4. Hutfrk, Treasurer 



■MM^AMMita^riMiailA 



Features 



Pags A4-TheSun-W«dn«day, April 17, 1974 



Namath ranks last 
Mt liberatedlist 



/ 



/ 



Sometime ago. I sfioie a magazine article 
in which I named J^^Hmath as America's worst 
male chauvinist. Iffiggested, in irony, that the 
bragging quarterback, then known as Broadway 
Joe. distribute "Joe Na math Slept Here" buttons. 

Evidently, his managers took my suggestion 
seriously Joe Namath is now endorsing a line of 
sheets and pillowcases. They're called the 
"Playmaker Collection" and are distributed by St. 
Mary's, a division of Fieldcrest Mills. 
Advertisements show Joe between color-cordinated 
sheets. 

According to D.M. Tracy, president of Fieldcrest, 
Namath receives a flat percentage (the actual 
figure is secret) for every dozen sheets sold. It's no 
secret, however, that the Namath promotiwi is 
aimed at women, who do 95 per cent of bed and liath 
linen buying. 

Why Joe chose to endorse this product when 
admittedly all he knows about sheets is "I sleep on 
them"? 

•THKRE ARK ONLY about six men in America 
thaf women relate to . and Joe is one of them," 
Tracy bragged at a press conference, without 
revealing the source of hfs statistics. "We like his 
very believable life-style," the textile tycoon added. 

I don't know whether Tracy was refefrring to a 
magazine's report that Namath's bachelor pad 
purportedly featured "some of- the Jinholiest 
debaucheries since Petronius' last house party" or 
to Joe's statement "I pray every night when I go to 
bed." However, if you want an inside look at other 
football players' life-styles, pick up a copy of Dan 




Jenkins' "Semi-Tough" (ori^nally published by 
Atheneum and now in paperback as well), which 
accwding to the book jacket "tells us more than 
we've ever known about the modern athlete and the 
game of focAball." This is one of Vbs rare occasims 
when a publisher's blurt) can be called an 
und^statement. i 

FORTUNATELY, JOE NAMATH is not like his 
pigskin-minded colleagues. Here's his explanation 
of a woman's place in sports: 

"Befra-e the Super Bowl, I went out and got this 
bottle and grabbed this girl and brought her back to 
the hotel and we had a good time the whole night. 
It's good for you. It loosens you up good for the 
game." 

Did the girl get thanked foit the memory, if not for 
possibly saving the ballgame? This is Joe's 
comment to the press after a chance encounter with 
one of his adoring fans. 

"Boy, that was a real memory job. You know, I 
only was with that girl one night... only one night 
with the girl and I come up with the right name. A 
real memory job." 

(Al the Fiddcrest Press Ccmference Joe was 
careful to announce he had a steady girl friend. And 
he remembered her name.) 

ANOTHER EXAMPLE <rf how "one (rf the six 
men in America that women relate to" relates to 
\yom«i is iti his autobiography entitled "I Can't 
Wait Until Tomorrow Because I Get Better Looking 
Every Day." Joe describes the entourage that 
accompanied him on his triumphant return to his 
hometown as "...a lawyer, a public relations crew, 



a few friends and two tenrion-easers, a tall one and 
a short aie." 

Just in case any reader should miss ttie meaning 
(rf "tension^aser" Joe made It clear. "The short 
one was wearing a completely transpar«it blouse." 
He later described her departure in see-tturou^ 
pants. 

But how does Joe relate to women who are not 
romantically involved with Mm, like his employes? 
The Jet star demonstrated his heart of gold when as 
co-owner of the New York pub "Bachelors III" (an 
interest later relinquished because <rf allied 
professional gambling presoice) he fired all his 
waitresses withmit .warning and summarily 
replaced them with waiters. While the women 
picketed outside, Joe partied inside. Smilii^ly, Joe 
explained the firings to reporters: "We find that 
men dfo a real good jot^." 

.DESPITE SUCH antiwoman, antilabor, 
antihuman attitude, Joe is still the darling <rf die 
media. Time Magazine in a cover story ^orlfied 
Namath as the all-Americ|m male rdering to His 
"booze 'n' dames" exploits with a leer more envious 
than critical. New York Magazine gave his injuries 
more coverage than those of war-wounded 
veterans. And Cosmc^litan ran an ad with this 
headline, "We make pantyhose for Joe Namath." 

Next to the photograi^ all an appropriately hosed 
model was this exfdanatory text: "They're wwn by 
women, of course. But they're really made for men. 
Men like Joe Namath. Who are himed off by tired 
legs. Legmen." 

You better not get varicose veins shopping for Joe 
Namath liiKns. 



HOROSCOPC 



Frmn 
AprHU 
toApHI23 



AiUE9:(llaRhntoA|ril 
II - AIM ArlM AMXidait) - 
Shift yow attaifion now to fi- 
nances and r^ ertate mat- 
ters. Problems in Ok iKone 
can only be solved by a self- 
leas attitude on yoiB* pvt. Be 
phikw^cal about a list- 
ened faodg^ — check ac- 
counts for leaks. 

TAURUS: (Avra 21 to May 
» - Alaa "nians Asceodaat) 
— Be son to "look your best" 
to nudte a good liqvession. 
Personality shines, efaoriama 
is Ydgja. Contact thoee in im- 
fMiaiA poatittis about per- 
sonal projecto, ambitimis. Be 
considerate of mate or ittrt- 
ner. 

GEMINI: <Mqr 21 to Jnae 
» ^ Also GeaEdai Ascendaot) 

— Change and vague prom- 
ises tfe "in the air." Be very 
realistic — stay with the rou- 
thie way where possiUe. Deal 
with realities instead ct theo- 
ries. Sedc older- and wiser 
heads for advice on problems. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
21 —Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Work with dependable 
methods proved valuable 
through experience. Avoid 



inHKHlant deciskns regvd- 
ing job, if posttile. Impulsive 

actioitt will be r^retted. 
Some increase in finances is 
inttcated. 

IJ»: ( Joly 22 to Aagast 22 

— Also Leo AsccndHBt ) - 
You will muk Job matters 
wiOi zest now. New ap- 
proaches to obi routines bring 
pi»itiveresutte. Cu-b "steam- 
ndkr" methods and use com- 
mon sense. Cwoau^ty activ- 
ities favored. Social life (ddcs 

VIRGO: (Aagnst 23 to S^ 
22-Abo 1^0 Ascendant) - 
Ask for what you want now re- 
gardii« job intereste — you'll 
probal^ get it! Promottons, 
increased prestige and popu- 
larity are all indicated. A 
"special" Mendah^ is re- 
warding and voy beneficial 
to you. 

LIBRA: (S«1>t 23 to Oct. 22 

— Abo Libra Ascendant) - 
Your judgment may not be too 
reliable now, so pos^xme im- 
portant dedsions if possible. 
Consult experts regarding 
any decisions you must make 
now. Job demands and per- 
sonal Itfe conflict — do your 
duty first. 

SCWIPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— ProUems at home may re- 
flect on job performance. You 
have several alternatives for 
action — investigate eadi 
tiuroughly. Siow reqiect for 



(dder, ii^ueiAial friend who 
can be in^ortant in yoar life. 

SACrrrAUl^: (Nov. 21 to 
Dee. 21 - Abo aagtttarias'As- 
cendant) — Very favorable 
time for inqportant duwges — 
fn-ge aiiead in a postive man- 
ner. Don't be diverted fata 
pUrpos^id action by blends 
or family. Use intuition and 
creative ideas to gt^ cveer 
moves. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Caprteora As- 
cendant) — Pay attention to 
I»rtners now, eqieclally tf 
you have ne^cted tiiem ra- 
centiy. Solve conflict by di- 
verting some of your attentkn 
from career to domestic mat- 
ten. Avoid speculative «%n- 
tiu^ — be conservative. 

AQUARRJS: (Jan. 21 to 
Feb. U - ilta» Aqnarias As- 
cendant) — Ddays. pre a wir e a 
and tensifflu appear eased 
now. Be alert for opportuni- 
ties comected witti honae, 
real estate, investaiento and 
partnerships. Publicity or ad- 
vertisbig favored now. Ottiers 
are cooperative. 

nSCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 
— You are particularly sub- 
ject to deception now — ftxd- 
ing yourself! Be extremely 
realistic — if it seems "too 
good to be true," it probably 
is. Resist wishful Uiinking. 
Postpone imp(Miant dedsions 
where possiUe. 



i-ine re 



19 th Hole 

RESTAURANT 

Fine Foods - Catering - Private Parties - Cocktails 

SPECIALIZING IN: 

• BUSINESSMEN'S BREAKFASTS 

• LUNCHEONS 

• DINNER FOR TWO 

Breakfast Lunch 

7 am to 2 pm 1 1 am to 2 pm 

Dinner 

5 pm to 10 pm 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 7 pm 
John Scott on the Organ 
(Reservations Desired: 428-7527) 



GOLF RANCH MOTEL 

1040 Laskin Rd. Virginia Beach, Va. 



Glamour enters new chess scene 



After Boris Spassky's job on 
Robert Byrne in the Candidates 
Chess quarter-final, Newswedt 
International informed its 
readers that not only was the 
former champ alive and well, 
but that we'd better brace 
ourselves for a reprise of 
Iceland '72. 

Spassky's comportment was 
described in the kind of tones 
usually reserved for Gary 
Grant. The modern chess scene, 
in fact, seems to be acquiring 
the aura which the game 
enjoyed in earlier periods of 
history, when twth society and 
royalty cultivated it as it did 
ballet and art. 

To commemorate the famous 
Paris Exposition of 1867, a great 
international chess tournament 
was organized in which the 
chief prize, aside from money, 
was a magnificent Severes vase 
given by the Emperor himself. 
The tournament was won by 




with Joseph Brown 



Ignatz Kolisch, who apparenUy 
made the right connections, for 
he soon gave up the exciting life 
of a poverty-stricken chess pro 
to go into business, where he 
became just another millionaire 
and baron. 

NOT MA. chess masters are 
that short-sighted. The fact that 
he was born into wealth did not 
keep Alexander Alkhine from 
following his star into history as 
one of the game's greatest. 
Indeed, closer looks at many 
titans of industry and heads of 
state leave the feeling that 
many, if given the choice, would 
rather rule the ch^s wwld than 
their personal fiefdoms. 



An Equoi Opportunity Employ«r 



Do-it-yourself kit. 



You can save money on your long 
distance calls by placing them yourself. 
Here's how. First you dial "1 ", then the 
area code of the area you are calling 
(if different thanryour own), then the 



number you desire. The next thing?you 
know, your party is on the other end of 
the line. It's a quick, sensible way to 
lower your long distance bill. Try it. 




t^ 



f¥f^ Cobny 
T^phone Company 

A Mefiier ol CcxitifKntal ^ephone System 




At the Manila tournament, 
last fall (won by Denmark's 
Bent Larsen), President 
Ferdinand Marcos, of the 
Philippines, was photographed 
grinning happily while playing 
chess with Bobby Fischer, 
something Henry Kissinger 
{vobably can't get to do with 
even a janitor in the French 
National Assembly. 

At the 1950 Olympaid, in 
^ubrovnik, Yugoslavia, the 
extroverted Argentine 
grandmaster, Miguel Najdorf, 
achieved even greater fame by 
being photographed slapping 
Marshal Tito on the back. 

"President Peron takes a 
great interest in our chess 
activities," boomed Najdorf. 
"He usually opens our events." 

"I." responded Tito, "prefer 
to have the last word." 

TITO'S SPECIAL interest in 
the game makes it easy for 
chess pros to carry their heads 
high in Yugoslavia, which is 
second only to the Soviet Union in 
its commitment. Thus, it is a 
rare day when a westerner can 
win from a Yugoslav— as at the 
recent Hoogoven tournament, 
in Holland, when 21-year-old 
Jim Tarjan. of Sherman Oaks, 
California, obtained his 



today's chess pro is allowed to 
be as good as he can be. "niat 
famous chess amateur, 
Napoleon Bonaparte, made it 
difficult for his opponents by 
insisting on winning every 
game. 

But VIPs, nowadays, are 
more realistic about their chess 
ambitions, undoubtedly sensing 
the truth of Somerest 
Maugham's observation: the 
difference between the amatuer 
and the professional is that the 
latter has the capacity to 
progress. 



HOOGOVEN 

TOURNAMENT 

—1974 

WijkaanZee, 
Holland 

Jim Tarjan 

(USA) 

Bojan Kurajica 
(Yogoslavia) 

RUY LOPEZ 



«: 



International Master title after 



a fine win (see below) over 
Bojan Kurajkra. 

In the western world, the 
bastions are Holland and 
Germany, where a career in 
chess is looked on by youngsters 
there as a life in basebitil is by 
the kids here. At the 19S8-S9 
Hastings (England) Chess 
Congress, the West German 
ambassador confided that he 
once {^yed on his school's 
chess team. But his headmaster 
decided that his muscles were 
developing faster than his 
iH-ain, and so transferred him 
out of chess and into athletics. 

In one respect, therefore, 

ACROSS 

I. Con^mr 
gnimbte: fium 

6. Unctf '^-- 
junetun 

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12. nenim'i 
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13. iBTohlWl 

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10. N-QB3 
n.B-K3 

12. P-KR3 

13. P-B4 
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15. KR-Ql 

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20.BxB 
21.QxP 

22. 22. N-Q5 
23.Q-K5 

24. N-N6 

25. B-B5 

26. NxB 

27. N-N6 



18. EMckdisrpljr 

19. Motels or inni 

20. Gumoundi 
23. BuaballtMin 
s4. TfoodcB my 
a, rorUd 

26. Groapof 



32. V«rfe _ 

33. HaiiSG$ 

34. Striptinic 

35. P.jmui 
•mpcjrdr 

3C. iMkup 
38. Skillful 
n. Grawoldfr 

42. Porihunc! 

43. AnMnt 

44. Ext»imly hut 
pUc* 

48. Rcmaia close: 
2«iis. 

50. NaMing 
mcdiam 

51. — iR,4ilclrrl« 

52. SUtas further 
63. European 



30. SingiacToiec 

31. Nichtbsfotc 
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pot'tw 

ssyres 

etice 

6.' 

6. aHHusion 

7. immti 

8. BpdiUyer 

9. Residyeof 
smcitinc 
process 

10, Father: 
French 

11. Fruit drinks 

14. HST'shMH-^ 
town 

16. Mnthers 

15. Queued (up) 

20. Box csutitiusly 
»Wi light 
blows 

21. Nimbus 

22. Mr. Preminitf r 
a. "N" in 

. U.S.N.A. 

2S. Disguise or 
misreprescat 

27. To tiie shel- 
tered side 

2i. Freshwater 
Ml 

29. Nautical mile 

17. CircmriRg, 
•* 

38. AtaHwphere 
St. Fopular movie 
1^1979 

40. P<Jier stake 

41. lUmser ^ 
Lahar* 

a. Erwriaeami 




44. niAionartlic 

48. Everjmnc 

48. Car (or kire 
47. "Private—" 

dclMtive 

49. Emcw 
SuUitraa 



StrlcUy 
Personal 



Romance could 
go to the dogs 

By PAT and MARILYN DAVIS 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My fiancee has a d()g and 1 carTt stand^irp^t. 
He is one of those little yapping Chihuahuas. When I 
walk through the (k)or, this hound runs up to me 
barking and nipping at my heels. I'd like to give it a 
good kick in the teeth but don't dare. 

When we are married, I don't want that dog 
around. My girl says the dog goes where she goes. 
How can I get rid of this miserable cur? 

No Dog Lover 
Dear NDL: 

Be big about the whole thing. Don't let your 
romance go to the dogs. 

Dear Pat and MarUyn; 

I am 24 years old and have been living with Les 
for two years. We have good jobs, a nice apartment, 
plenty <rf friends, enjoy each other and our life as it 
is. The only fly in the ointment is our parents. Both 
sets feel we should marry and are constantly 
dropping hints. 1 do not want to get married and 
don't intend to. What can I do about this parent 
problem? 

Brenda 
Dear Brenda: 

As an adult, you have a right to make your own 
decisions. And, as an adult, you must be prepared 
to live with the result of those decisions. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My wife is soon going to run out of space to store 
her so-called bargains. There isn't a drawer or 
cupboard in out* house that isn't stuffed to the brinv. 
Here's an example of what I mean: Joyce came 
home with one dozen dippers in a miserable green 
shade. She said they were cheap and that she 
couldn't pass up a good b|iy. She has yards oi 
material. So much, in fact, that it is stored under 
our bed. We have enough yarn to start a knit shop. 
*^!Bie has every pot an^^^ made right down to two 
, different teakettles oh the stove! Have you ever 
heard of any other woman who thinks she needs two 
teakettles and one dozen zippers? 

' (ilen 

Dear Glen: 

Obviously, your wife believes in being pr^ared, 

e and your cupboards runneth over. I doubt there is 

little you can do about such a conscientious bargain 

hunter. « 



Seriutionim 



B-6 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My hair has a dry, dead lock. It is not tinted, but I 
do get permanents. Why do I have this problem? 

Marion 
Dear Marion: 

Are you in good hralth? Do you eat a proper diet 
and get plenty of rest? There are two {Mime 
requisites for h^lthy hair. We'll a^ume that your 
answer is "yes." 

Ttw care ol the hair is exb^mely important. Try 
giving yourself a scalp massage. Massage in rotary 
motions starting at base (rf neck. Shampoo hair 
when necessary. Iliis vari^' from incUvidyal to 
individual. However rften yoa shampoo use a good 
soap and rinse very very well. 

Once a week try a Nmiemade hot oil treatmoit. 
Massage baby oil or olive oil into scalp. Wrap hair 
in towel wrur^ out in l»t water. Cover with dr>' 
towel to retain heat. Soak hair three times andrtn% 
well. 

If tbe hair do^ nor rrapond, cot^ult your family 
doctM-. 

mu: Nt ml mrifym Dm4$, Vt^i fym* S'm. JSSRme. 
mmt Read, n^ i k tndi. ¥m. 2i4Sl 



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Gardenin g 

Garden tours celebrate spring 



■nw Suo-Vfadnaiday, April 17, 1974--PaiH AS 



^.Virginia in the springtime will 

glorified for the 41st year 

f^during the statewide Historic 

Gar(kn Week Saturday through 

AiH'U28. 

The week, sponsored by the 
Garden Club of Virginia, is one 
of the oldest and largest 
garden tours in the cmintry. 

Local tours are sponsored 
annually by the Virginia Beach 
Garden Club and the Princess 
Anne Garden Club. The Virginia 
Beach Garden Club and the 
princess Anne Garden Clul) 



tour is April 25. Hours for both 
tours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

DURING THE Beach tour, 
luncheon will be available at 
Galilee Episcc^al Church, 40th 
Street ai^ Pacific Avenue, from 
noon to 2 p.m. An exhibit of 
unusual church needlepdnt will 
be shown. 

Block tickets are $5 and single 
admission is $2. Information 
and tickets are available at 
each house on the tour. 

The six homes on the Beach 



tour are all open for the first 
time. The first showplace, 
owned by Dr. and Mrs. Thomas 
W. Turner, is Shibui on 
Birdneck Point. The 
contemporary home appears to 
lean out over the water offering 
a magnificent view of Linkhorn 
Bay. It is filled with Japanese 
and American art objects. 

Painted a soft sea blue, the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
H. Crump Jr. at 4505 Ocean 
Avenue looks upon the Atlantic 
Ocean. The home is filled with 




V 



DAVIS GARDEN ON THE PRINCESS ANNE TOUR 



interestii^ objects of art and 
has both a pool house and a new 
garden, with most of the 
planting done in 1972. 

The Bay Colony home erf Mr. 
and Mrs. William C. Overman; 
at 1000 S. Bay Shwe Drive is a 
white clapboard designed and 
built by the owners. The home is 
surrounded by piles, azaleas 
and dogwood with a yard 
stretching from the formal 
boxwood and rose gardens to 
the surrounding woods. 

In another Bay Colony home, 
owned by Mr. and Mrs. Alan 
G.T. Gregory at 1324 N. Bay 
Shore Drive, the artist-owner 
has combined zestful color with 
traditional pieces. Vibrant 
greens, rich blues, burgundy 
and tropical colors 
predominate. 

THE OCEANFRONT home of 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Brown 
at 103 54th St. is a large^two 
story house (A white brick and 
yellow timber. Exterior 
plantings of yellow and white 
complement the house. Mrs. 
Brown, a designer, has 
transformed the older structure 
into a modern beach house. 

High in Princess Anne Hills 
sits the brick home dt Mr. and 
Mrs. Waverly L. Berkley III at 
420 Discovery Circle. The house 
is in a wooded area planted with 
azaleas, daffadils and dogwood. 
The porch offers a view of the 
garden and the water beyond. 

The Princess Anne tour 
includes a boat tour of 
Lynnhaven River and the 
Ches^ake Bay. Block tickets 
are $6. The house and garden 
tour is $4. single admission $1.50 
and boat tour $3. Coffee will be 
served at Lynnhaven Inlet 
Municipal Marina, luncheon 



(noon to 2 p.m) at All Saint's 

Episcopal Church, 1968 

Woods id^ Lane, and 

refreshments from 11 a.m. to 5 

p.m. at the second garden on the 

tour. 

^ - ( 

The Princess Anne tour is a 
garden and home walking tour. 
The first of six stops is R(^bins 
Garden, 2432 Plantation Drive, 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Cliff (H-d E. Robbins. A weeping 
willow and a crabapple tree add 
color to the garden of azaleas, 
camellias and shrubs. A walk 
leads past a goldfish pond to a 
view of Lake Wolfsnare. 

GREEN GARDEN at 2433 
Plantation Drive, the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Green 
Jr., has trees and shrubs 
enclosing the yard for privacy. 
Bordered 'walks bind through 
azaleas, dogwood and Chinese 
holly pasta rustic pond. A lower 
garden has a series of paths 
through a Japanese garden with 
footbridge leading to the 
Lynnhaven River. 

Davis Garden at 2504 
Forehand Lane, th»? home of 
Capt. and Mrs. T.E. &avis, is a 
unique garden planned by the 
owners. Plantings of elephant 
ears, ferns, water hyacinths 
and cat tails surround a goldfish 
pond on the patio. 

The Maples at 1904 Lynn Cove 
Lane, owned by Mr. and Mrs. 
Chester B. Gifford, Is a copy <rf a 
colonial New England garrison. 
The spacious hall, hand-hewn 
beams, antiques and brick 
fireplace complement the 
colonial flavor of the home. 

The yellow colonial style 



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OVERMAN HOUSE ON THE VIRGINIA BEACH TOUR 



Campbell House, 1913 Lynn 
Cove Lane, owned by Capt. and 
Mrs. James H. Campbell, is 
surrounded by trees, azaleas, 
camellias and bulbs and 
overlook the Lynnhaven River, 
the home is filled with antiques 
and the library has a large 
collection (rf westerrf art. 

The home of Lt. Col. and Mrs. 
John B. Lamond at 1698 
Woodslde Lane is a brick 



uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!;iiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiii'. 



^ 



Neptune mum 
is star of show 



The Neptune Festival's official flower, a yellow 
chrysanthemum dubbed "The Classic," will be the star of 
the CourttU of Garden Clubs annual flower show Friday 
and Saturday at Pembroke Mall. 

The festival flower was chosen last week. The Council 
of Gardten Clubs is in charge of promoting the planting of 
the flower throughout the city to provide autumn color 
during the festival, Sept. 27-Oct. 6. 

THE MUM WILL be on display at the show and plants 
will be offered for sale. Residents and businesses are 
asked to plant the flower to compete for awards at festival 
time. 

"The Dance of the Flowers" is this year's theme for 
the Council flower show. Members of Virginia Beach 
garden clubs will exhibit artistic and horticultural 
arrangements in various categories. 

The flower show Is sponsored each year by the Council 
for the public's enjoyment and to encourage competition 
among its garden club members. 

There Is no admission charge. Visitors and shoppers at 
Pembroke Mall are welcome to drop by to view the 
arrangements and see the hew festival flower. 

THIS YEAR'S show will have a junior division, open to 
junior and intermediate garden club members as well as 
4-H members, Scouts and children cA garden club 
members. 

Artistic awards wllJ be given fw arrangements 
depleting dance In America from colonial times to the 
present. An award of merit will be presented to the 
horticultural exhibit judged tops In all division of 
blooming flowers and ground covers. 

A sweepstakes award will go to the single exhibitor 
winning the most blue ribbons in the horticultural 
division. 

Reba McClanan, president of the CouncH Of Garden 
Clubs of Virginia Beach, said that this year's show will be 
the largest ever held. Mrs. John C. Brewington of the May 
Farm Garden Club is general chairwoman of the show. 
Co-chairwoman is Mrs. Arthur H. Gallagher, Cbesopelan 
Colony Garden Club. 



GARDEN PLOTS 
FOR RENT 

Hilltop Area 
(next to Zayres) 

Plots 20'x50' priced $20.00 til Jan. 1$t. 

CALL 486-6546 





colonial two-story home in i^ 
natural setting of pine and 
dogwood with plantings of 
azaleas and camellias. The 
home is furnished with Oriental 
rugs and antiques and overlooks 
the river. , 

No smoking is allowed on the 
tours and low heels are 
suggested. 



FRUIT 
TRiEES 



Dwarf & Stondanl 




The Sun's Gardening page 
eadr week for articles 
which can enrich your lives 
and your property. 




FLOWERING TREES 

Chtrry-Dogwood-Rfld Bucf 



SHADE TREES 

White Birch-Red fWapIt, etc. 

1 V2' Ugustrym IOf.r'16 

Blooming Azaleas $1 & Up 



^mS LUMiiT An KOSTlXnMKeU LAWK GAH E%H 

LawiKHnar 



PROVEN ON OVER A MILUON 
LAWNS COAST TO COAST 



The Liwn-A Mol Man ii the large*) and moii tiperienoed 
■Miomiied lewn ceie epecieiiti - the eiiperi (or more then one 
maiior hoiTiBOwnefi coeillDcoiiil He «iii plant a new lawn 
01 cualomife a piogrem lur your lawn and poclintbooli 
Hit Lawn-AMagic uroducia are ot the higheit quatity and 
compeitiivfl m pncn to all oihet naiionaliv adwariieed quaiiiv 
brandl Pluilhev are GUARANTEED ThcLawnAMetMan 
will analyre youi lawn end aell vau only what you need Vou wiii 
nottwiatinQidinsunuBed waited tjaotot product Hawtiideiwef 
and apply evenly at the piopvi |im» powc< toll and powei aaralu 
- all th« worh lie* you pay only tor in* producit wotir 
lawn naeni and he QUARANTEES a iichei graanei lawn 



INTRODUCTORY OFFER 

$35.30 value only 



"Duio lurl" with 
Iron t mlcionuttlmti 

rawn UMTiON 

raWK MLLINI 



lor up to 
4000 sq II 



CALL 853 • 2591 

FREE ESTIMATE 




Lawnamar^^ 

A LOT OF ORABB OnOWS UNOen HIS PetT 



AUTOMATED I TIME 
OR ANNUAL SERVICE 







Ponsies- Candy Tuft -Creeping Phlox 

Strawberries • Blackberries - Onion Sets 

ROSES 

Purple Wisterio - Hydrangeos 
House Plonts • Hanging Basliets 




K^ 



iqs 

Compete Garden Center 

.WjO Hrnvidence Rd. Phone 42(l-2S2.') 
MondavSaturdsy 9 A.M -'. P.M. . 
Sundav r2::l(l-4;;10 P.M. 



ANNUAL SPRING 

AZALEA SALE 



CONTINUES. 



Priced 

or 10 for 'S" 



^•^K 



•!•• to •4'» 



Save By Buying in Lots of 10 



WE GUARANTEE OUR PLANTS TO LIVE! 



*.\ 



COLEMAN NURSERY,-^ 

GARDENTOWN /K 

'THE HOME OF CHRISTMAS WONDERLAND" ^m^\ 

1934 HIGH ST. (RT. 17) ^^^T^S 

SINCE 1942 484-3426 ^^IT^^^ 



SEffi> & GARDEN STORE 



LOST -due to "yellow anemia' 
I MiRACID could have saved it! 




TURN HEALTHY CREE 

"Yallow anamla" (Chlorotli) It a dingarou* 8oz. 

Mllarl It can ba cauiad by Imprapar toll acidity %% ^q 

or aarloua Iron daflclancy. Inttant-Actlon ., ' 

MIRACID halpa atop "yallow anamla"! Mora than 1'/> lbs. 

Jutt a plant food, MIRACID auppllaa wondar- $2.69 

worklna CHELATED IRON plua othar vital crowth - ,, 

alementt. Aeldlflaa toil at It faadt. ° lb*- 

OUARANTEEO fatt raiu itt or monay back. K.sg 

mm MIRACID. 

with Instant-Action Chelated Iron 



1 



Lime & Fertilizer 
Lawn Spreader 




17 "wide 
20 " wid* 



$16.t7 
$28.90 




LIMS CREST 



GKAitwii"- 




S0R>.ba9 $1.50 



ORTHO 

sprayett* 4 

AjHachri to your got 
tftti ho\t. oppJi*t up 
lo lour goflnnt ol 
tptoy "ith on« htting. 

$3.98 





HUDSON 

Cortiprcttion 
Sprayer 

6116 S16.70 

(2«aHom) 

6220 $l».9i 

1 3 galtoni} 



BcM by Test jor over 100 years 



TJLITtB mEmJ>mnAGMWtVEM STORE 

900 Tidewater Drive 
at Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Opm: Mow, thfw fri. 8 o.w. to 5=30 p.m.; Sot, to 1 p.m 



hge A-6 -The Sun -Wednesday, April 17, 1974 

Countdown 



r 



(Continue from page A-l) . 

between incumbent Garland 
Isdell and! ft-. Henry McC(ty, 
both candidates have called for 
a controlled prowth plan where 
city serviws could catch up 
with the growth. Mr. Isdell 
propiffies the adoption (not just 
the presentation) of a 
"balanced" five-year Capital 
Improvements Program (CIP) 
that would tell exactly when an 




Apn21Api;27 



tm^x-'X 



area of the city was to receive 
city servias. 

Both candidates say bus 
transportation is the only 
feasible means of transit in the 
Beach at the present time Dr. 
McCoy speaks out against ever 
establishing rail service for the 
city. He terms monorails as "a 
shy and too expensive" and 
adds "you've got the same 
problem with them as you do 
anything else — you have to 
entice people to use them." 

Neither candidate is in favor 
of establishing a redevelopment 
and housing authority like the 
one in Norfolk. Both would vote 
for city funding for 
rehabilitation of existing 
housing over a housing 
authority. Mr. Isdell expands on 
that idea, saying "building 
inspectors should first survey 
the city's substandard housing 
and report what needs to be 
done." He would then seek 




WANTED 

Houses To Sdl 

Anywhere in Va. Beach 

For quick results and more cash in your pocket . . . 
let us sell your property. A competent staff of Profes- 
sional experts on duty and always available. 

CALL 497 4851 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginia Beach Blvd. at Aragona Blvd. 



furds to loan to those who could 
not afford to repair their home. 
The fiinds^ would be for 
rehabilitation <rf their present 
home or coistruction of a 
minimum dwelling (if the home 
was irrepairable) . 

nk. McCOY FEELS he can 
better dealt with education 
froblems thsn Mr. ImieM. He 
would use the new bonding 
capacity and possibly revenue 
sharing funds to add more 
monies for schools. Mr. Isdell 
says his background in 
engineering and surveying 
makes him the more qualified 
candidate, 

Mr. Isdell, 49, has been on 
Council since his appointment 
in November to repjace Donald 
Rhodes who was- elected to the 
General Assembly. He served 
on the Board of Zoning Appeals 
for four years prior to hts 
appointment. He is the 
president ' of General 
Construction Co., Inc., a firm 
specializing in repairing 
(tamaged buildings. Mr. Isdell 
has received the endorsements 
of the Virginia Beach Forum 
and COPE, tiie Committee on 
Political Education of the local 
AFL-CIO. PACE members 
recommend that teachers vote 
for him, although he did not 
receive enough votes for an 
endorsement. 

Dr McCoy, 41, is a dentist in 
the Kempsville Borough. He is 
chairman of the board of 
Tidewater Community College 
and is on theBoard ot Visitors of 
Old Dominion University 
(ODU), as well as being a 



Th/s is my schedule . . .Come oui and lei's talk" 



April 20 - 



April 27 



May 4 



10:30-12:30 
1:00- 2:30 
2:45- 5:00 

10:30-12:30 
1:00- 3:00 
3:15- 4.00 
4:15- 5:30 



...^London Bridge 

.....Lynnhaven Rd. ind Vi. Beach Bhfd. 

.....Witchduck Rd. snd V*. Bewh BhnL 

..„.Pembroke Meadowi 

....Robbins Corna 

...-Bayade 

Faimeis Market, Diainond Springi 



10:30 
1.00 
3:00 
4:30 



12:30 
2:30 
4:00 
6:00 



A-P, Laskin Road 

31tt St & PaciTK, Attantic, Baltic 

......17th St and Atlantic 

......Lynnhaven Bridge Area 



Cecily AAacdonald 

For City Council 




PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



By Authority of Mary A. Buerk, Treasurer 



member of the ODlP^tudent 
Affairs Committee. He is also 
chairman of ttte Chinese Comer 
tnranch of People's Bank. 

IN THE CONTEST for the 
Lynnhaven Borough seat, 
candidates Vice-mayw Ervin 
and opponent John Griffin have 
set goals for an evaluation of 
efiy management and 
efficiency as fiist priorities if 
elected. Mr. Griffin, says he 
would ask City Manager Roger 
Scott to evaluate the city 
(Apartments. Mr. Ervin will 
seek a professional 

management study by an 
outside consultant to evaluate 
the operation. 

Mr. Ervin lists completion of 
the land use plan now under 
consideration by the Council as 
a main priority along with 
assignment of priorities in the 
CIP. (The city manager's staff 
is planning to set those 
priorities, but Mr. Ervin says it 
needs to be done now rather 
than following the current 
schedule which would have the 
priorities set by next year.) 

Transportation in the city 
should be a combination of a 
rapid transit system and a bus 
system, says Mr. Griffin. He 
calls for the installation of a 
rapid transit system on east- 
west railways from Oceana to 
Little Credi. Later, he says the 
system could be expanded and 
neighborhood shuttle buses 
could bring riders to meet the 
rapid transit. He says he would 
vote to fund the transit system 
but believes more than 70 per 
cent of the money could come 
from available federal funds. 

••BUS SERVICE is the only 
thing we can afford at this 
time," says Mr. Ervin, who is a 
member of the Tidewater 
Transportation District 
Commission. 

Concerning the substandard 
housing situation in the city, 
Mr. Griffin offers no solution. 
He says he "is not convinced 
that the housing situation is so 
critical that we need to 
establish an expensive 
bureaucracy, like a housing 
authority, to handle it." He 
believes that the answer to low- 
cost housing is not to put all the 
needy in the same 
neighborhood. He suggests that 
integration of neighborhoods by 
price of houses might work but 
(rffers no method for seeing that 
it is done. 

Mr. Ervin says he will not 
oppose a redevelopment and 
housing authority but it depends 
on the federal and city funds 




r« 



DEBBIE HOUSE 

COMMERCIAL NOTE TELLER 



^ 



A NOTEWORTHY EMPLOYEE 

Unless you're involvKi with commercial notes, you probably will never 
have an opportunity to meet Debbie. She's the commercial note teller 
at our main office, and is responsible for answering questions and 
taking curtailment on notes. 

Debbie's thorough experience, combined with her pissing personality, 
adds a charming note to any busineK day. 



PEOPLE'S 
BAN K 

OF VIRGINIA BEACH ^^ 

^^^^ .i^V MEMBER FDIC 

FIRST W FREE CHECKING • FIRST IN SATURDAY BANKING 
L^hi Read • K«ii(»viile • Btysicto • Lynnhaven • Chiiwte Coriwr • Indian River Ro^ 

Phone 425-5077 • Member FDIC 
THE BANK THAT MAKES IT HAW»EN 




available. He says he has "been 
lobbying" for a long time to get 
the minimum housing 
inspection divielion changed 
from the state-city' health 
department \ to city 
management (The city 
manager proposes such a 
change in his 1974-75 buii^et.) 
Mf. Ervin prefers to see low- 
cost loans made arallaUe to 
families who need ttw money 
for home repairs along with 
more rigid enforcement of the 
city's housing code. 

MR. ERVIN SAVS his 

badcground as an engineer with 
knowletJ^e of capital programs, 
as well as his cmitact with civic 
'groups makes him the more 
qualified candidate. Mr. Griffin 
charges that Mr. Ervin's 
building connections do not 
allow him tQ vote without a 
conflict of interest Mr. Griffin 
says he can vote without a 
conflict of interest 

Mr. Ervin, 51, has held the 
'Lynnhaven Borough Council 
seat since 1970. He was elected 
vice-mayor in 1972. He is 
president of Reid Associates, 
Inc., a form that engages in 
general and mechanical 
contracting. Mr. Ervin has 
received the endorsement of the 
Virginia Beach Fmim. , 

Mr. Griffin is a stockbroker 
for Legg, Mason and Co., Inc. in 
Norfolk and is a former 
newsman. He has received the 
PACE endorsement. 

COUNCILMAN FLOYD 
WATERFIELD 'is running 
unopposed in the Pungo 
Borough. Mr. Waterfield, 36, 
was first elected to the Council 
in 1970. At that time he ran on a 
ticket which was originally the 
Nine for Progress and included 
Councilman Dr. Clarence 
Holland. Both councilmen are 
running independently during 
this election. 

He is a volunteer with the 
Emergency Coronary Care 
Program and the Fire and 
Rescue Squad. He is president 
of the Princess Anne Plaza 
branch of First and Merchants 
Bank. 

All candidates said they 
approved of closed meetings 
only when dealing with the 
specific exemptions under the 
Freedom of Information (Fol) 
Act. Nevertheless, incumbent 
councilmen. who have voted 
weekly to hold a closed session 
at the fdlowing meeting, said 
the closed sessions are 
necessary to argue matters 
among themselves and to 
discuss appointments and legal 
matters. Candidate Gaynette 
Winter said statements of 
specific matters to be discussed 
in closed session should be 
included in the motion to h(dd 
the meeting. Candidate Dr. 
Henry McCoy said, "The 
Virginia Beach City Council has 
been hiding behind the Fol Act. 
If used as it is intended, the Act 
is a good thing." 



Census taker may 
soon be knocking 



If there's a knock on your 
door this week, it could be a 
census taker collecting data for 
tfiecify schocds' triennial school 
census. 

The ceiwis, required by the 
state every three years, is to be 
conducted between April 22 and 
May 31. Every household in 
Virginia Beach is to be 
interviewed. 

The state requires Oie census 
data to determine allocatims of 
state sales tax money returned 
to localities. The state requires 
qurations on number, ages, sex, 
grade levels and school 
attendance of children in the 
households. 

IN ADDITION, the city will 
participate in this year's survey 
asking a seccmd set of qpiestions 
about occupatimi of parents, 
salary levels, employment 
locations and types of hrnnes. ^ 

The city's part of the survey is 
to help determine future 
planning for streets, recreation, 
utilities, library services and 
other city services. 

Cost of the survey is 
estimated between $40,000 and 
$50,000. The city will pay $10,000 
(A that cost The schools will pay 



the balance. Workers who will 
conduct the census interviews 
will be paid 50 cents per 
household. It is estimated tb^ 
arje approximately 65,000 
hmisehoMs m the city. 
Another $6,000 to$8,000 will be 



used to process the infoimatioif 
using the city's data processing 
equipment. ' 

• 

Housewivi», cdle^ studen(# 
an^ some irachers will sflfv^ 
the city. j 



Boadr Cancer unit 
begins itoor-UMhor 

cmsade for Amds 



A door-toKloor fund-raising, campaign will be 
conchicted by ttie Virginia Beach unit of the 
American Cancer Society Friday ttirough April 
25. 

The Beach unit's campaipi will be conchKted 
at the same time as other campai^is nationwide. 
April has been designated as Cancer month. 

During the fund drive, the Cancer Society will 
also be informing the public of cancer's waridiig 
signals and conducting a general cancer in- 
formation campaign. 

Evan J. McCorcle is chairman <rf the Virginia 
Beach Cancer crusade. 



ROLL CALL 



WASHINGTON - Here's how 
area Members of Congress 
were recorded on major roll call 
votes April 4 through April 10. 

HOUSE 

RECORDED VOTES: Passed. 252 for 
and 147 against, an amendment to strike 
language ttiat would tiave made it more 
difficult to force recorded votes in ttie 
tiouse. Ttie effect of striking the language 
was to kee^t twenty tt<e number of House 
members needed to farce a record vote. 

Ttie stricken language would liave 
required forty members for forcing votes 
in certain situations. 

Tt<e language was part of H. Res. W8, 
wt)icti ctianges some rutes of ttie HoUse. 
Tlie overall resolution was later passed. 

Tfiose voting for argued that the House 
should maintain reforms that have made 
its members more' accountable to the 
public. Rep Steven Symms If? Idaho) said 
the higher threshold would have made "it 
easier to ram legislation through this 
House." . 

Those voting against argued that 
recorded votes have been used to delay 
final passage of important legislation, 
such as the energy emergency bill. They 
argued that the House wastes too much 
time on minor amendments. Rep. B.F. 
Sisk (D Calif) called for ending such 
"dilatory tactics " 

Reps. William Whitehurst (R-I), David 
Salterfield (D-3), RobeH Daniel (R-3), W. 
C. Daniel (D-J), Caldwell Butler (R.4), 
Kenneth Robinson (R-71, Stanford Parris 
(R.|), William wampler (R-f) and Joel 
Broyhill IR-IO) votad "yea." 

Rep Thomas Downing (D1) voted 
"nay " 

VIET FUNDS: Rfiacted, 154 for and 177 
against, a S374millian boost in military aid 
to South Vietnam for the current fiscal 
year 

The move came as an amendment to a 
supplemental authorization bill (H.R. 
12545) for fiscal 1974 funding ot the 
Department of Defense. The bill was later 
passed and sent to the Senate 

Supporters argued tliat steppe'd up 
Communist attacks and South Vietnam's 
AS per cent inflation rate have gobbled up 
the Thieu government's weapon and oil 
reserves 



Rep. Robert Sikes (DFIa) said, "Wc 
have a commitment to ^elp the South 
Vietnamese - not ditch them." 

Opponents argued that American aid Is 
not bottomless and that the Defetise 
Department must be contented with the 
$12 billion already appropriated. Some 
members said that more arm* will lead tp 
to more war. 

Rep. John Flynt (OGa) urged sticking 
to the original level, lest the Defense 
Department think it can"crack the whip 
and the House will respond like a bunch of 
sheep." 

Whitehurst, Satterlicld, Robert Daniel, 
W. C. Daniel, Butler, Rablman and 
Wampler voted "yea." 
* Downing voted "nay." 

Parris and Broyhill did not vote 

UNEIMPLOYMENT RELIEF: Passed 
236 for and 168 against, an amendment to 
add {150 million for hiring unemployed 
persons in pubUc service positions. The 
money was added to an sa.8 billion 
supplemental appropriations bill (H.R. 
14013) that was later passed and sent to the 
Senate. 

The funds will subsidize 15.000 workers 
in state and local maintenarice and other 
public service positions. 

Suppoters argued that the extra money 
simply maintains last October's level of 
100,000 federally subsidlted public service 
employees. Rep. Edith Green (DOre) 
said, "What we need are lobs... not 
training programs for jobs that do not 
exist" 

Opponents argued that S140 million in 
unexpended 1973 employment funds make 
the extra money unheeded. Other 
opponents argued against the boost unless 
it was earmark*)! for areas with over 6^5 
per cent unemployment rates. Rep. Dapiel 
Flood (D Pa) said, "Let's get back to 
earth" on the best way to fight 
unemployment. 

Downing. Whitehvrst, Sitterlleld, 
RobeH Daniel, W. C. Daniel, Butler, 
Robinson, Parris, Wampler and Broyhill 
voted "nay. 

SENATE 

CLOTURE ON PUBLIC FINANCING: 
Passed, M lor and 30 against, a petition to 
end unlimited debate on S. 3044, a bill that 
calls for public {inan<1ng of federal 
elections 

There is no debate permitted on a 
cloture petition. But qenerally Speaking, 



Paid Political Advertisement 



JOHN 
GRIFFIN 

Candidate 

for 

CITY 
COUNCIL 




Remarks of John Griffin to a grtxip of citizens at the residence of Mrs. 
Betty Rwnulus, 956 Larkaway Ct. Bellamy Manor. 

^^^irginia Beadfis blessed with literaUy hundreds of dedicated and hard 
working employees. Each deserves the respect and support of every 
citizen (tf our commimity. These employees are spendii^ laig hours 
wtM'king to ma^ our life more enjoyable and they deserve our Uianks 
and encouragement. 

Tfi«r efforts deserve both rect^Wtioo and reward beyond that of mere 
finaiKial comp«isation. They should ibe encwirag^ to strive for higher 
goals and still greater servft^. To this end 1 pr^se that initiative be 
rewjarded by: 

1. Promotion of qualified employees from within. 

2. A cost of living iinlex clause be included in all anployee contracts 
which would likewise be applicable to ranployees who work without the 
benefit of a contract. 

3. Establishment of a complete civil service system for all our 
emplc^ees. 

4. Greater utilizatiwi of imput from employees in determining city 
policy. 

5. Improved working cwiditiwis. 

City employees des«^e to be treated as first class citizens. They are 
wOTkir^ for us in our city. They deserve to enjoy tl» same uniqtttness 
and atb-activeness of life in Virginia Beach that otha^ of us enjoy. 

John Griffin 

(See CriHin's Position on Cify Growfh on Page A-8) 
By Airtwrify<»f Mary L. Griffin, Trewirf 



I; 

those voting for favored the cgnct^^ogj. 
public financing. Seme voting for oppoMtf i 
the concept, but voted to limit debate liT' 
order to end a legislative logjam. 

Those voting against were oppoced toe 
public financing. ,, 

Sen. Harry Byrd ID volM "nay." Scf| 
WilllMD Scstt (R) dM iMt volt. • tj 

MSASTER RELIEF: TaWed, 49 tar M^ 
against, an amendment to make federal*^ 
disaster relief available retroactively tcf ' 
April 20, 1973. The amendment was offered!! 
to S. 30«]. a bill to speed relief to ai^ 
disaster victims, particularly victims olf 
recent tornadoes. * 

In tabling the amertdmcnt, the Senate 
voted to deny grants of up to tS,000 to 
penniless victims of disasters that occurred 
behween April 20, 1973 and April ), 1974. 

The bill calls for the federal government 
to pay 75 per cent of such grants, with 
states paying 25 per cent. 

Similar relief was availabe until April 
20. 1973 through Small Business 
Administration and Farmers Home 
Administration prograRvs. 

Those vpting to table argued that any 
cut off date is arbitrary, but going back a 
full year would create an Impossible 
administrative burden. They argued 
against loading down the bill with 
amendments that might delay relief to 
recent tornado victims. 

Opponents argued that all victims of 
presidentially declared disasters should 
be treated equally. Sen. George Aiken (R- 
vtl said, "I can not distinguish behween a 
tornado that struck the last Week in March 
and another the first week in April, but 
apparently" other senators can. 

Byrd voted "yti" and Scon did not vote. 

ELECTION FUNDS CUT BACK; 

Passed, 4« for and 43 against, an 
amendment to cut by 20 per cent the funds 
available for public financing of federal 
elections. 

The amendment reduced percandidate 
general election subsidies from 15 to 1M 
cents for each eligible voter in a~ 
candidate's constituency, and primary 
subsidies from 10 lo eight cents per voter. 

Supporters argued that cutting the 
subsidies would reduce the 
"budget busling" effect of the bill. Sen. 
James Allen (D Alai argued for "mixing a 
little restraint in "spending taxpayer's 
money intoihe idea of campaign reform." 

Opponents argued that the original 
subsidy level was the reck bottom needed 
for meaningful reform. Sen. Marlow Cook 
{R Ky) pointed out that eight cents per 
voter in primary campaigns would not 
even pay the cost of a stamp to send the 
voter a letter. Other opponents argued that 
the lower subsidy would give incumbents 
an unfair advantage over little known 
challengers. 

ByrH voted "Yea" and ScaMdId net vote. 

PRIVATE POLITICAL CON- 

TRIBUTIONS: Rejected, 37 lor and 54 
against, a move to table an amendment to 
reduce the slie of contributions in federal 
elections. The amendment was offered to 
the public financing bill. 

After reiecting the move to table, the 
Senate passed the amendment, which 
limits individual contributions 10*3,000 per 
candidate and limits an organization to 
UMB contributions, 

The bill originaliy limited individual 
contributions to S3.000 in a primary, run 
off primary and a qenerai election, for a 
maximum total of $9,000 per candidate. 
Similarly, organizations could have 
contributed up to t«,000 in each election, 
for a maximum of tIS.OOO per candidate 

Those voting tp table and thus kill the 
amendment argued that the smaller 
limits would force candkfates to finance 
their campaigns with tax dollars and take 
away their option for private financing 

Those voting against argued that the 
prior maximums of S9.000 and $1B,000 
represented "incredibly large" amounts 
of money. Sen Richard Clark ID Iowa) 
said that limiting "big money is a step in 
the right direction And the American 
people knew it" 

Byrd voted "yea" and Scott did not volt. 

1 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



r-- 

I 

I 



Cancel^ 

seven 

warning 

signals 

1. Change in bowel tir 
bladder hjibits. 

2. A sore that does not 
heal. , 

3. UnusiKil Weeding i )r 
dia-hiirKe. 

4.Thktenii^orlunip 
in brrcist ortlsewlwnt'. 

5. lmiigestwi«>rdiffiailt\- 
in swiilkwira^. 

6. Obsiius chjn^e in wart 
irn»)le. 

7. .Ni^KWgomKhiM- 
hoiU^ncsis. 



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Tha Sun-Wedneiday. April 17, 1974r-Pay A-7 



PREVIEW 



Beach netmen serve busy week 



.The Norfolk, schools are thrmgh with their spnng 
vacation, which caused some schedule disruption last 
w(^ jnd Be^cb tsam^have a busy week in stw^ for 
theai; • 

Track 

Five Beach track teams will be m action this 
aftertf^|i. Baysl^ is the h^m witji a byie. The schedule 
finds ^Bnc«» A«ne .liQbting Bookec T. Washington; 
Nwview travelling to Cox; First Colonial at Maury and 
Kellam visiting Kempsville. 

Th^ Cavaliers did not see any action last week. In their 
only dual meet action <rf the outdoor season, the Cavaliers 
fen viciiia to a brilliant indivlAial performance by 
Maury's Karlton Hilton, suffering a close defeat. 

Princess A nne'a opponent this week maybe in the same 
league, but are certain^ not in the same class. The 
Bookers are 0-2 on the season and have yet to come close 
to winning. Two weeks ago„ Kempsville rolled up over 100 
points against the beleaguered Booker T. Washington 
fwces. ' 

The Cavaliers should score win number one this 
afternoon. 

CoiiC was another local team tiiat did not see any action 
this past week. The Falcons only tour around the track 
. this^iason resulted ina crushing defeat to Kellam. 

The week <rff could have helped the inexperienced 
Falcons. Chris Reich is a promising; iniexperienced 
hurdler. At the time of the Kellam meet, Mike Newborn 
had only been pole vauiUngio' five days. Still, he placed 
third that afternoon. Wre extra practice time probably 
helped both athletes. 

In Norview, the Falcons are facing perhaps the best 
Norfolk team in the Eastern District. The Pilots are 1-1 on 
the season and gave Bayside a stiff challenge last week 
before losii^. 

The Falcons will be in for a struggle, searching fw 
their first win of the outdoor season. Brian Rhinehart, the 
Falcons fine long distance threat, could play an important 
role in any Cox upset. 

First Colonial has gotten v&l to a strong start in the 



outdoor season. The Patriots have won their first two 
meets with the latest success a narrow^in over city rival 
Kempsville. 

Maury should prwide the Patriots with their stiffest 
test of the season. The Commodores led by the brilliant 
HUten are 1-0 on the season. In the Princess Anne dual 
meet, Hilton wpn five events and anchored the winning 
Maury mile-relay team. 

Maury should pces& the Patriots, but Bert Lewis has 
won six events in two weeks. He could be the difference. 

The Kellam-Kempsville match could be the highlight 
of the aftemooi's action. The Knights are 2-1 on the 
season and have shown no ill-effects from their opening 
loss to Bayside. The Chi^s are off to a 1-1 start, bombing 
Booker T. Washington before dn^i^ng a close decision to 
First Cdonial. 

The Knights have followed the same pattern 
throughout the season. Ken Rutledge wins the shot put and 
the discus, and a different Knight stars in the running 
events. Sterling Johnson, Jeff Henry and Lindsey 
Cam|4)ell have all shared Rutledge's sptklight during the 
season. 

Kempsville has been led by Mike Crabtree and Steve 
Sawyer. The Chief duo have combined for seven victories 
so far this season. Sawyer is undefeated in the 880 and the 
mile. 

The meet should be close, but a Kempsville victory 
would have to be termed an upset. 

Tennis 

Four tennis matches comfriete a busy sports schedule 
today. Granby at Bayside; Cox at Princess Anne; Bo(*er 
T. Washington at Kellam and Norview at First Colonial 
are on ^p. 

Bayside has been having their problems so far this 
season, suffering shutouts to Princess Anne and 
Kempsville in recent matches. The Marlins are 0-4 on the 
year, but in Granby Bayside could find an opponent more 
to their liking. 

Cox will be facing one of the district's hottest teams In 
Princess Anne. The Cavaliers are undefeated on the year. 
Their most recent success was a 9-0 win over Bayside. 



C<» won their second straight last «^. Norfdk 
Catholic was the victim. Despite the Falcons improved 
play, the Cavaliers could have a little too much too handle. 

First Colmial opened the season with a impressive S-4 
win over powerful K«np6ville on March 22. Since then the 
Patriots only court action has been a loss to Princess Anne 
as the rain has raised ha voc with their schedule. 

In spite of the lack of competitive court time, the 
Patriots figure to handle Norview. 

Friday, the local net men will take to the courts again. 
Bayside is at Maury; Princess Anne travels to 
Kempsville; Cox hosts Grants and Kellam Is on the road 
at Norview. 

The Kempsville-Princess Anne match-up is the most 
Important of the season thus far. The Cavaliers are 
undefeated, while the Chiefs have the one loss to First 
Colonial. If Kempsville Is to challenge Maury for district 
superiority, they can not afford another loss. 

To complete the busiest week of the tennis season, four 
matches will be played Tuesday. Cox Is at Maury ; Granby 
travels to Kempsville; Bayside hosts Booker T. 
Washington and Kellam is on the road against First 
Colonial. 

Golf 

After a sparse schedule last week, the high school golf 
season picks up momentum this week with three matches 
scheduled. Bayside, Cox, First Colonial and Lake Taylor 
will play at Stumpy Lake. First Colonial has registered 
the biggest upset of the golf season, knocking <rff two-time 
defending state champion Princess Anne. The Patriots 
should be the class of the field. 

At Ocean View, Granby will play host to Booker T. 
Washington and Kellam. The Knights turned in a 
creditable performance last week at Red Wing, finishing 
second to Kempsville. Kellam should improve upon their . 
runner-up flnish. 

Kempsville will try to continue their fine play, taking 
on Maury and Norview. The Chiefs led by Roger Savage 
should have little problem in handling their two Norfolk 
challengers. 



BAYSIDE TRIUMPHS 



Weisner scuttles Chief title express 



ByJOHNBANNON 
Sports Editor 

Kempsville's chase after their third successive 
state teseball championship ran into some unex- 
pected (M'oblems Thursday. 
. Bayside, behind the pitching of Craig Weisner, 
upset the previously undefeated Chiefs 5-1 at 
Kempsville in the Eaistem Dii^trict opener for both 
teams. Weisner, limiting the Chiefs to a scant six 
hits, outdueled Kempsville ace right handter Jimmy 
Moore. 

Moore suffered his first defeat of the season 
against two wins. One of the earlier wins had been a ^ 
brilliant one-hitter, Moore had fashioned against 
the Marlins in the season opener for both clubs on 
March 22. Entering the second Bayside game, the 
Chief hurler had allowed only one ean^ run and 
five hits ovesr his first 14 kinings. 

ON THURSDAY afternoon, Bayside wasted little 
time in solving Moore's mound offerings. The 
Marlins jumped to a quick lead with a two-run s|x)t 
in the top of the first inning. The Chiefs would never 
recover from the opening lapse. 

After i^etiring the first man of the inning on a fly 
to center, Moore's control put the Chiefe in trouble. 
Marlin cent^rfielder Joe Osborne worked the Chief 
hurler for a base on balte. Osbortie moved into 
scoring position promptly stealii^ seeond and 
third. Unraveled by Osborne's base running antics, 
Moore failed to find th? st^te u>ne^ against 
Weisner, putting runners on first and third. 

Clean-up hitter Marty Moore and Richard Kiger 
made the Chief's pay the price for Moore's wild- 
ness. Moorfclined a single to left, counting Osborne. 
Kiger followed with anotho- single, bringing home 
Weisner with the second run of the innii^. 

Mowe pitclKd his way. out of the two-on one-out 
jam, getting George Tyner on a called third strike 
and forcing first baseman Stan Tarkenton to 
ground into an inning-ending force-out. 

MOORE SEITXED down the rest of ttie way, 
.hiding th» Marlins to one earned run and just two 
hits. 

Weisner was not Overpowering in his first route- 
goingperformanee of the srason. Tlie Marlin south- 
paw nad'^e big pitch when he needed it. Despite 
gett^ rt«*eJ«Dn in six of the game's seven inn- 
ingsflwChi^ riev«- managed to get the clutch 
hit ia mO>e them back into contrition. 

Wosntr had nmi^rs on m scoring posltiwi twice 
In tl« opening inning. A ^walk to tead-off hitter 
Mdi^^tt1|: wiW pitch had Weisner ami the 
Mararii^^l; Mot wattt. Chief third basenan 




KEMPSVILLE'S JIMMY Moore uncorks a 
pitch in action Thursday against Bayside. 
Hie Chief's stylish riglithander fashioned 
his third complete game of the season, 
holding the Marlins to just five hits. It. was 
to no avail as the Chiefs lost their first game 
of the season 4-1. (Sun photo by Neat Sims) 



Steve Hansen Uned into a double play to tem- 
porarily relieve the pressure. 

Weisner had himself back in a jam when he 
nicked Chief shortstop Alan Price with a pitch. 
Price moved into scoring position with a stolen 
base, but Weisner wormed his way out of trouble, 
gettfi^ Mark Q'Hara to ground out. 

THE CHIEFS caught up with the Marlin hurler 
in the bottom of the second ihning. Bob Harrison 
and Jerry Crain sorted the inning off with back to 
back singles. A sacrifice bmt and a Frank Wddi 




sacrifice fly to-right pulled the Chiefs within one at 
2-1. 

Kempsville threatened to knot the score as 
Weisner issued another base on balls. Weisner 
continued his charmed life, however, forcing Moore 
to pop to- short. 

In the third, Weisner had his most unusual inning 
of the game. He set Kempsville down in order. 
Facing the heart of the Chief order in Hanson, Price 
and O'Hara, Weisner retired the side on two routine 
ground balls and a strikeout. 

In tiie fourth inning the Chiefs were back on the 
base paths. Itarrison started things off with a line 
single back thrttigh the box. Crain worked his way 
on with a walk, and Kevin Smith moved the runners 
into scoring position with a sacrifice. 

AT THIS POINT, the Chiefs committed an error 
not befitting their state championship status. Welch 
grounded to second baseman To^my Foskey for a 
routine out. Crain made a base runnii^ mistake 
taking off for the Harrison-occupied third base. Not 
wishing company, Harrison belatedly headed for 
home. The ball arrived well ahead of the Chief for 
the inning ending out. 

When things are going right, everything sems to 
fall into place. In the fifth and sixth innings the 
Marlins picked up single runs with only oae hit in 
each frame. In the fifth, Bayside used a single, an 
error, and an infield out to build their lead to 3-1. A 
one-out single, a sacrifice and a Price error on a 
routine grounder led to Bayside's final run in the 
sixth. 

Weisner continued his pitching magic over the 
final three innings. In the fifth and sbcth inninf^, the 
MarUn southpaw pitched out of two-on jams. In the 
final frame, Weisner weathered a two-out Hanson 
single, notching the final out i>n a grounder to 
second. 

Kempsville left eight runners sb>anded on the 
base paths. It was the Chiefs inability to capitalize 
on the numerous scoring opportunities, which 
spelled the difference in the contest. 

The Chiefs, still 6-1 overall, face a stiff road 
ahead in the search for repeating as district champs. 
The competition is stiff, and the early loss coiild 
prove cosUy 



Athlete^ of 
the Week 



Ragct 
Sav^e 



HAYSfDE PLAirEns jfiyf their pttelMn* 
O^ig Weisner a victory rile, fhe Marto 



HiampUm CMefe fiv 'ttie Marlins to the 
l?Astefn District ofiefiir for both squads. 
(Sim phMo hv Neal Sims). 



Kempsville 



Itempsville's Roger Savage has been 
sd^ted Virginia B&ttA hi^ school atMefe of 
the week. 

Tlie Chief golfer posted a four und^^jar % 
at I^ Wing golf course Thiffsday leadii^ his 
team to a quadrangular Easten District golf 
victw^. In his last two rouncb over the Red 
Wii« «wrse. Savage is nine un<ter-par. 

An outstandii^ athlete will be named 
weddy by Ttw l^n through^mt the high sclMxri 
spring sports season. 




SIDEUNES 

John 

Dsmioii 

Sports Mtor 



Where have all 
the hitters gttpe? 

"The pitchers are ahead of the hitters." Nary a 
spring goes by without someone uttering Uiat 
shopworn baseball iihrase. 

This season is no different but for once the 
statement seems to hold some water. Pitchers in 
local highschool baseball have been the dominating 
factor in the early going. 

Kempsville has played sevfn games this season 
and the startiog pitcher has beoi around at the 
finish six times. In the only game the Chief starter 
did not last, so|^omore Scott O'Hara came on to 
pitch six and two-third innings of sc(Nreless relief. 

KEMPSVILLE'S Jimmv Moore ooened the 1974 
Beach season with a one-hitter against Bay- 
side. Since that time, Moore has been joined in 
the one-hit circle by teammate Frank Welch, I^irst 
Colonial's Darrell Doss and Kellam's Joe Kwasny 
(twice). 

Cox has been a favorite target of the one-hit ar- 
tists, succumbing twice with just a sin^e hit. 

the Beach has not been totally devoid of hitting 
stars. KeUam's Tom Morrissey and First Colonial's 
Chris Swecker have established themselves as tlie 
early season powers at the plate. 

Kellam's Morrissey has been instrumental in the 
Knights excellent 5-1 start. The senior first 
baseman is hitting at a 500 clip, driving in five runs 
in the Knights first six games. 

Patriot Swecker is in a dead heat with the Kellam 
star for the city batting lead. The senior catcher has 
banged out nine hits in his first 18 trips to the plate, 
Swecker has displayed the best long ball pov/er of 
any Beach hitter with three triples and two doubles 
to his credit. The Patriot also leads the city's RBI 
race as he has knocked home nine teammates in 
First Colonial's first six contests. 

a*oaa*» <> ^ 

TWO WEEKS ago Bayside sprinter Leroy Baxter 
turned in a time of ten flat in the 100-yard dash in 
the Marlins dual meet against Lake Taylor. The 
performance would have earned Baxter a school 
record in many areas in the country. 

Certainly, one would expect a harrier to win a 
high school 100-yard test with a ten second time on 
most occasions. This time it was drastically dif- 
ferent. Baxter's finish could earn him no better 
than a third place finish. To make the cir- 
cumstances even more radical, the two finishers 
ahead of Baxter wore Bayside colors. 

Teammates Roscoe Coles and Jerry Mosely 
placed ahead of the unlucky Baxter. Coles posted a 
school record 100 time of 9.7 seconds, while Mosely 
was a step behind with a time oi 9.8, Coles and 
Mosely have split their first twosprints in one of the 
most interesting match-ups of the outdoor track 
season. 

A RAGING debate could be brewing among 
Beach baseball coaches— the subject being the 
city's best catcher. There are three leading can- 
didates for the top honor in Kellam's Scott Layden, 
Kempsville's Jerry Crain and First Colonial's 
Swecker. The Patilot maybe off to tiie quickest 
start of the three, but Crain and Layden are not far 
behind. 

A team must be strong behind the plate to be 
succmsful. The combinnl 15-4 rea>rd of the three 
teams is a telling testimony to the talents oi the ti-io. 



PRINCESS ANNE Coach Leo Anthony may not 
look back on 1974 as a vintage year. The dean of city 
basketball coaches suffered nis first lasses ever to 
both Kempsville and Bayside this past season. The 
Cavaliers also failed to win the city basketball title 
outright for the first time in six years. 

Now the Anthony-led Princess Anne golf team 
has had their 77 match win-streak snapped by the 
combined efforts of First Colonial and Kempsville. 

The Cavalier golfers could salvage some ot 1974 
for Anthony by capturing their third coresecutive 
state golf title, but the return road looks much 
tougher this year. 




wmmmmmmmmm 



Phee A4-T1ie Sun-Wednesday, Aptfl 11. 1974 



f 



Spot, 
trout 




$ $ 



for 
tourney 



' 'inflation hite eVferywhere— even the 17th annual 
Vir^nia Salt Water Fishing Tournament which 
opens May l. 

It will take a heavier fish to earn a citation in two 
of the contest's 22 divisions. Gray trout and spot are 
the two category's affected. It will take a nine- 
pound gray trwit to earn a citation this year as 
opposed to the seven-pound limit of a year ago. The 
award winning weight for spot has been raised from 
14 ounces to 15 ounces. 

TIIK CHANGES were announced by the 
Department of Conservation and Economic 
Development which operates the tournament as 
one phase of the state's salt water sport fishing 
promotion program. The change in the minimum 
weights was recommended by tournament director 
Claude Rogers after discussions with anglers and 
commercial fisherman. Rogers also reviewed the 
total number of entries for each species in the 
contest for the past 16 years. 

The size of gray trout caught in the tournament 
has been on a steady rise since 1970. There were 
only 83 citation winning trout caught in 1973 when 
the minimum requirement weight was four pounds. 
However, in 1971 the number jumped to 600. With 
the minimum weight raised to six-pounds in 1972, 
725 trout citations were awarded. Trout were not 
only getting bigger, but anglers were learning 
where and when to look for them. When the citation 
minimum was raised to seven pounds last year, 
anglers were awarded 1575 trout citations— «02 for 
fish weighing eight pounds or more. 

Citation-size spot were the biggest surprise of last 
year's tournament. Anglers far outdistanced the 
previous high of 65 citations in 1972, catching 1045 
spot of citation size. There 284 spot weighing one 
pound or better. Unlike gray trout, which have been 
getting bigger ever since 1%9, the tournament 
office had no information indicating there wouW be 
so many big spot last year. The spot fishing season 
was longer in 1%9, but in the tournament's 16-year 
history there has never been a better year for big 
spot. 

THE VIRGINIA Tournament, inaugurated in 
1958 to promote and develop Virginia's sport fishing 
within the limits of established conservation 
practices, originally listed 15 eligible species for the 
six-month conte^. The tournament was extended to 
seven-months in 1969 and now features 22 
categories. 

There is no tournament entry fee and an angler 
can weigh his catch at any of the 100-plus official 
weighing stations located throughout Tidewater 
Virginia. Over 45,000 anglers have been awarded 
the four-color citation plaques for outstanding 
catches, during the tournament's 16-year existence. 

Eligible species and their minimum weight for 
citations in 1974 are : Blue Marlin (250 pounds), 
Shark ( 100 pounds ) , Black Drum ( 60 pounds ) , Tuna 
(50 pounds). White Marlin ( 50 pounds) , Cobia (45 
pounds), Amberjack (45 pounds). Tarpon (40 
pounds), Channel Bass ( 40 pounds), Wahoo (20 
pounds), King Mackerel (20 pounds). Striped Bass 
(20 pounds), Bluefish (17 pounds), Dolphin (15 
pounds ) , False Albacore ( 15 pounds ) , Flounder ( six 
pounds), Tautog (six pounds), Gray Trout (nine 
pounds), Speckled Trout (four pounds), Sea Bass 
(four pounds). Whiting (two pounds) and Spot (15 
ounces). 

In addition to the citations given for catches 
meeting the minimum size requirements, trophies 
are awarded each year for the heaviest fish m each 
of the 22 categories. The trophies are sponsored by 
private firms interested in the promotion of salt 
water sport fishing in Virginia. 



Paid Political Advertisement 



JOHN 
GRIFFIN 

Candidate for 

^ CITY 
COUNCIL 



Knights, Patriots continue winning ways, 
but Princess Anne and Cox still 




ing 



Baseball finally made It through a week without 
the weather disru|Hing the schalule. All six Beach 
teams managed to get in a game as the Eastern 
District season finished its first week. 

Other than the break in the weather, there were 
no other major surprises in the week's action. First 
Colonial and Kellam continued (heir fine play, and 
Princes Anne and Cox continued to struggle. 

Thursday 



hake Taylor 3 Princess Anne 

Princess Anne opened their Eastern District 
season with only one non-league game under their 
belts. The inexperience proved tellir^, 




clinchii^ run in the bottom <rf the final frame. 

April 10 

First Cohmial 6 Granby 5 



A 




PRINCESS ANNE catcher Terry 
Sawver takes a hit at the plate from a 
Lake Tavlor runner in action Thursday 
at Prinoess Anne. Sawyer held on for 
the put out. but he must be wondering if 
it was worth it as his team lost 3-0. (Sun 
phntn hv Rod Mann). 



Bayside wins third 




Remarks by John Griffin to residents at the residence 
of William G. Foster f537 Sea Gull Road. Malibu. 

The*direct)on of future growth of Virginia Beach mn%X not be allmwed to 
adversely aff^t the quality of life in the community. A major reMon our 
city has experienced an increase of nearly 150% t)etween 1960-1973 was 
because of its many environmental resources and the quality of life avail- 
^le. ^ r 

1 . Provide for safeguards of our beaches, dunes, inland waterways, 
w^lfeids and wildlife habitats as well as our open spaces. 

2. /UxeStrate our program for providing adequate facilities and services 
(schools, water & sewer and recreation) for all our residents 

3. An equitable tjalance and location of single family, apartment, 
ttwvnhouse and commercial development. 

^« Removal of antiquated and arbitrarily imposed height limitations 
on iMiildings which have forced our urban sprawl. 

5* initiate an ongoing program to obtain maximum imput from citi- 
isri& in determining priorities for capital improvement programs. 

To Krfiieve these objK:tives, I would work toward establishing a seriK 
of ntis^borhood-council meetings conducted during evening hours to 
mcouti^ maximum citizen i:>^iclF^f1on. , 

J9hn GrIHIn 

(See Griffin's Position on City Employees on Page A-6j 
By ^#M>rity of Mwy L. Grtffm, Inamrm 



The Cavalier hitters could not solve the offerings 
of Lake Taylor's Byron Sharp. The Titan hurler 
shutout the Cavaliers on three hits to key Lake 
Taylor's 3-0 Win over Princess Anne. 

The Cavalier's Dave Weldon suffered from the 
lack of hitting support. Weldon dueled Titan Sharp 
on even terms for much of the game. Weldon gave 
up a single run in the top d the first and then 
slammed the door on the Titans til the top (rf the 
seventh. 

Weldon could not keep up the pace, however, as 
the Titans clinched the issue with two runs in the 
final inning. 



Kellam 7 Norfolk Catholic 6 

At the start of the season, Kellam Coach Don 
Peccia predicted his team could be the dark horse of 
the baseball season. His players are making his 
forecast ring true. The Knights upped their record 
to 5-1 with a non-league 7-6 win over Norfdk 
Catholic. It was the 100th baseball win in the 
school's history. 

The Knights even survived a five-run Crusader 
burst in the second inning. For the second time this 
season, senior Rich Bloxom came on in relief to 
close the dow on a rallying opponertt. KeHam's only 
loss this season came at the hands of defending state 
champion Kempsville. 

The Knights rallied back from a 6-2 deficit for the 
win. Kellam picked up two runs in the bottom of the 
third inning and tied the score with two more in the 
fourth inning. The Knights scored the game-' 



"I'm going to start skipping the seventh innihg »\ 
and Jtiet call it the eighth," kidded a happy First ^ \ 
Colonial Coach Ted Phelps. ; 

The Patriots survived their second shaky , 
seventh inning d Uie season gaining 6-5 extra-inning J 
Eastern Dfetrlct opening victory over Granby. The i 
Patriots blew an early lead and had to rally for the ; 
victory. A week earlier the Patriots had entered the • 
seventh inning against Princess Anne, holding a '^ 
comf wtable 3-0 lead. First Colonial barely escaped » 
with a 3-2 triumph. \ 

Against Granby, the Patriots entered the final » 
frame owners of a 4-2 margin. Three outs later the 
Comets had regained the lead they had not held 
since Uie opening inning. Granby scored three runs 
in the top of the seventh to take the lead 6-5. 

The Patriots loaded the bases in their half of the 
seventh, but all they could manage was the tying 
run. ' 

In the eighth. First Colonial put the issue to rest. 
Shortstop Larry Bowman executed a perfect suicide 
squeeze, scoring Dave Warren with the game- 
winning tally. The Patriots are now 4-1 overall. 



Kellam 4 Cox * 

Kellam's JoeKwasny is estaWishing himself as I 
the premier pitcher in the Beach so far this season. 4 
The Knight senior improved his record to 2-0 on the | 
year as the transfer from Rhode Island hurled his \ 
second one-hitter of the season. Behind Kwasny's ! 
pitching, Kellam gained a 4-0 win over Cox in the ] 
league opener f ot both squads. The Falcons are now.i 
0-3 on the seascm. 

Kwasny was overpowering in his second ptart e^ 
the spring. He recorded 14 of his team's 21 putou^ 
on strikes. Kwasny has yet to give up an earned mt? 
in 15 innings of work and has struckout 29 batters 
over the saihe stretch. 

The Knights gave their pitcher the only run he 
needed with a single tally in the top of the third 
inning and put the game away with a three-run 
outburst in the fourth inning. 



Patriots nudge Chiefs with reiay win 



The early outdoor track 
season has been marked by 
numerous record - setting 
performances. The Bayside 
school record in the 100-yard 
dash has been lowered by two- 
tenths^of second. Ernie Davis 
has set a new First Colonial shot 
put mark. The lowering of 
standards and rapid times in 
most events have marked the 
progress of the season thus far. 

Last week's dual meet action 
was a different story. 
Hampered by unseasonably 
cool tempeffures and stiff 
winds, city harriers posted 
some of their poorest times rf 
the spring season. 

STILL, THE action was close 
and furious. Three city teams 
came away with dual meet 
wins. Kemj^ville, the lone local 
loser last week, fell just a few 
points short. 

FirsI Colonials? Kempsville 84 

The two-city teams fought on 
even terms right down to the 
last event of the dual meet. The 
Patriots won the mile relay and 
the meet, covering the distance 
in 3:40.1. The First Colonial 
relay team pulled to a 
commanding lead on the first 
leg of the race. The Chief 
pursuers could never seriously 
threaten the margin separating 
the two teams, losing by almost 
50 yards. 

As expected, the dual meet 
was the closest of the season. 
The Chiefs strength in the long 
distance events was more than 
offset by the field duo of Ernie 
Davis and Bert Lewis. 

Davis continued his one-man 
assault on the First Colonial 
shot put record, besting his old 
mark set just a week earlier. 
Davis upped the Patriot record 
with a heave of 54'0". 
Teammate Jerry Ohnaizer also 
bettered the old standard with a 
throw of 52'8", giving the 
Patriots a one-two finish in the 
event. 

Patriot Lewis continued to be 
one of the most impressive 
harriers in the city with his 



second consecutive triple win 
meet of the season. The First 
Colonial basketball star 
finished first in both the long 
jump and the triple jump, with 
meet best leaps of 20'9" and 
43'3". Lewis won his second 
straight 100-yard dash test d 
the season in a win abetted time 
of 10.4. 

Kempsville's Steve Sawyer 
continued his classy long 
distance performances! For the 
second successive dual meet. 
Sawyer put the 880 an* the mile 
in the Chief win column. The 
Chief harrier turned in perhaps 
the best time, during the 
weather hindered meet. Sawyer 
covered the 880 distance in the 
excellent time of 2:05.7 only 
two-tenths of second off his 
winning pace a week ago under 
ideal conditions. Sawyer's 
teammate Matt Slavish 
completed the Kempsville 
sweep of the long distance 
events with a win in the two- 
mile. Slavish came home 
the winning time of 10:10.3. 

Kempsville high jumper Mike 
Crabtree did not equal his 
school record-breaking 
performance rf a week before, 
but still captured his specialty 
with a leap of six feet. 

Patriot Onhaizer followed his 
second place shot put effort with 
his second 220 win of the season. 
The Patriot's time was 23.6 
seconds. 

Bayside 71 Norview 60 

Bayside's track team 
continues to roll right along. 
The Marlins upped their dual 
meet record to 3-0, besting a 
challenging Norview entry 71- 
60. 

The Eastern District leading 
Marlins continue to be keyed by 
their senior duo of Roscoe Coles 
and Eric Chapman. The swift 
Coles swept the sprints for the 
Marlins with first places in the 
100-yard dash, the 220 and the 
440. Despite turning in his 
poorest 100 time of the season 
(10.2), Coles easily won his 
second dash in three tries this 
season. Coles posted his second 



best 440 time of the season, 
covering one lap of the track in 
53.5. Running his first 220 of the 
outdoor season, the Marlin star 
bested the field with a time of 
23.4. 

Teammate Chapman 
continued his pattern of run- 
ning just well enough to win. 
Bayside's cross-country star 
came home first in the mile 
even with his slowest time of the 
season. 4:57.5. 

Bayside's Leroy Baxter, 
making only his second 
appearance of the- outdoor 
season, was impressive. The 
Marlin senior captured his first 
win of the spring season, taking 
the long jump with a leap of 
20'n". 

Wayne Lockett continued to 
be the Marlins most impressive 
hurdler with his third 
consecutive winning 
performance. Lockett 
outdistanced his Norview 
competitors with a time of 17.1 
in the high hurdles. 

Kellam 88 Granby 43 

Kellam's track team remains 
perched one quick step behind 
the leading Marlins. The 
Knights won their second dual 
meet of the season rebounding 
strongly- from their season 
opening loss to Bayside. 



The Knights became the 
second city team in two weeks 
to administer a thrashing to 
Nwfolk's Granby. The Comets 
were soundly beaten two weeks 
ago by First Colonial. Kellam 
now owns a 2-1 record. 

Battling the wind and the 
cold, Kellam's Lindsey 
Campbell tied the school record 
in the 100-yard dash, sprinting 
to a 10.0 clocking. The Knight 
completed his winning after- 
noon with a triumph in the 220. 
Campbell turned in a winning 
tirne of 23.1. Campbell's 100 and 
220 times were both city bests 
tor the week's action. 

A familar result took place in 
the field events during the 
Kellam-Granby meet. Knight 
football star Ken Rutledge won 
the shot put and the discus. 
Rutledge has delivered six 
individual victories to the 
Knights this season, placing 
first in both the shot put and the 
discus each time out. He won 
the shot \Vith a heave of 49'8". It 
was Rutledge's poorest distance 
of the season, but still good 
enough for his third shot put of 
win of the season. 

Kellam's Margo White turned 
in the.week's best 440 time with 
a 51.4 seconds performance. 
The Knight mile-relay team 
was also impressive, posting a 
meet best time d3:20. 



First Colonial*; 
KtmptvlllfM 

Shot-puf— Davis (FC), M'O"; 
OiK0»— CampbalKK), «'0^; ' 
High Jump— CraWrA (K), i'O"; 
Polt Vaulf— Cournoyar (K), iO"*"; 
Lon« Jump— Lewis.(FC), 30'9"; 
Tripla Jump-Lawls (FC», 43'3", 
Hifh Hurdlai— vennet (FC). 16.9; 
lO»-LevKis (FC), )0.4; 
Milt— Sanvyar (K), 4:33.9; r 

44«~ 'ordan (FC). SS.S; 
inMrmtdialt Hurdlai- Boone (FC), 44.7; 
Mr-Sawyer (K), 1: 0S.7; 
IJO-Ohnaiiar (FC), 23.4; 
Twe-IMil*— Slavish (K). 10:10.3; 
Milt-Relay— First' Colonial (Slomlnsid, 
Bowyer. AAogn. Jordan), 3:40.1 



Bayside 71 Ntrv lew M 

High Hurdles— Loci<e« (B), 17.1; 

1(»-CoIes (B), 10.3; 

Miie-^Chapman (B). 4:S7.S; 

Inttrmedlate Hurdles— Sweatt (N), 42.0,' 

aw— Chapman (Bl, }:OS.Ii r, 

MO— Coles (B), 23.4: 

Two-mile— Kays (B). 10:31; " 

Pole Vaull— O'Toole (Nl, 11'*"; 

Shot put— Joyner (N), 4«'9": 

Hifh Jump— Ware (N), S'6"; 

Long Jump— Baxter (B), lO'll"; 

Discus— Fatherly (N), 150' O"; i. 

Triple Jump— Rose (N), 42'4": 

Mile Relay— Norview (Davis, Brown, 

Sweatt, Hargrove), 3:3«.5; 

440— Coles (B), 50.4. ii 

Kellam M Granby 43 

Loot Jump— Woodbury (G), 19'11"; 
Shot put— Rutledge (K), 49'8"; 
High Hurdles— Harrington (K), 16.4; 
lOO^Campbell (K), 10.0: 
Triple Jump— Zorin (K), 41'9"; 
Mile— Simmons (Kl, 4:44.5; 
Pole Vartt— Tretethen (K), 10'4"; 
440— White (K), 51.4; 
Discus- Rutledge IK), 1M'5"; 
Intermediate Hurdles— Harrington, (K), 
»»»-Connelly (K), 2:13; 
High Jump— Conelly (K), S'lO"; ■ 

220-Campbell (K), 23 1; 
Two mile— Simmons (K), 10:30.5; 
IMile Relay- Kellam (Johnson, Godfrey, 
CampMI, WhHt). 3:30, 



,JL^ 



MONEY — — 

We Provide It 

When you are disabled due to 
accident or sickness. 

Call: 625-3604 

Harvey Lieske 

, LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

^ft 8 B II ft q a a fl B B 8 9 fl I L8.8.9.8 8 8 11 aiUA.fl.9.9 8 a«; 






FftST fW^WfAt star Bert Wwls 
H midwav throai^h his meet-winning 
triple fiimfi afainnt Kempsville last 
weefc. Ijpwis was a ^j^ factw ta the 



Patrtflls narrow victory, ^atnini; 
three individuql wins. (Sun photo bv 
l«ihn Bnnnon> 



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tht SuA-Wedneiday, April 17. 1974-Pige A-9 



PREVIEW 



Chiefs: Just another team in the crowd 



The Eastern District baseball 
standings look stranijely Afferent this 
week. For the first time in a couple «rf 
years. Kempsville is not perched sKap 
the standings. 

Bayside. thanks to the clutch pitchir^ 
rf Craig Weisrier, has changed the 
architecture of the District standirfS: 
The Marlins are joined at the {op irf the 
standings by Fir^t Cdonial and Kellam. 
AU three Beach squads have perfect 1-0 
league records. {^tii% their district 
seasons off on the right foot. 

TWO-TIME defending state 
champion Kempsville finds themselves 
in the unaccustomed losers bracket. 
The Chiefs join Princess Anne and Cox 
at the bottcmi with an 0-1 mark. 

One game does not make a s^son, 
and KempsviUe's shot at a record third 
consecutive state title is far from 
finished. The district season is only ten 
games long, however, and the Chiefs 
can ill afford another district loss. The 
overall strength in the league is 
improved vastly over last year. It may 
take a 9-1 record to latch on to the top 
rung in .the district. 

BAYSIDE 

"We're winners now, and everybody 
is going to be gttnning for us," warned 
Bayside Coach Terry Mwton after his 
charges had upset defending state 
champion Kempsville. 

Bayside will protect their new found 
"king of the hill" prestige twice this 



week. Friday. Bayside hosts Maury, 
and on Tuesday the Martins are home 
again against Princess Anne. 

Pitcher Craig Weisner, who six-hit 
Kempsville, could be the key to 
Baystde's KrowinK title hopes. The 
talented senior has given up just 
one run in his first U innings of woric 
this seasoa Morton will undoubtedly 
call on Weisner in all the Marlins 
important games. 

Center fielder Joe Osborne has been a 
pleasant surix-ise fen- CAch Morton. 
Osborne started the spring batting 
eighth in the Marlin line-up. The senior 
has now moved himself up to the 
number two slot with four hits in two 
games, two' weeks ago. Against 
Kempsville.Osborne's hitting streak 
was stopped, but he had an RBI, a run 
scored and two stolen bases. 

One of the keys to the Marlin season 
could be the performance of the 
number two-man in the Bayside 
pitching rotation— Marty Moore. If 
Moore can perform up to the level he 
did against Lake Taylor, Bayside's title 
dreams cpuld become a reality. 

COX 

TheFalcMis are 0-3 on the year and 0- 
1 in the district. The Falcons problem 
can be stated in just one word- 
hitting— or rather the lack of it. In their 
first 21 innings. Cox has managed only 
two runs. The, Falcons have been 
shutout by First Colonial's Darrell Doss 



and Kellam's Joe Kwasny, both on one 
hitters. The Falcons have just six hits to 
their credit. 

C(Bc will have a tough assignment on 
Thursday. The Falcons travel to 
Kempsville, catching the defending 
state champions coming <rff their first 
loss (A the season. Tuesday offers a 
better opportunity for the Falcons first 
victory of the season. Granby travels to 
Cox with both teams winless in league 
play so far. The Comets dropped their 
second league contest, committing the 
astronomical total of 10 errm-s in a 
s^ven innit^ game last week. 

/ 
If the Falcons can not break out of 
their hitting slump, it cmild be a loi% 
year for Crach Tom Fisher's forces. 

FfRi?T COLONIAL 

First Colonial could be one of the 
surprise teams in the Eastern District 
race this spring. The Patriots have 
rolled to a 4-1 overall record and are off 
to a quick 1-0 district start with a win 
over Granby. 



Coach Ted Phelps has been 
pleasantly surprised by the 
performance (rf his pitching staff. The 
trio of Carl McDonald, Scott Lowry and 
Darrell Doss have been consistent 
everytime out with Doss turning in 
perhaps the best efforts. 

The Patriots will face Norfolk 



competition in the second we^ of the 
league season. On Friday afternoon. 
First Colonial hosts Norview. while on 
Tuesday they travel to Lake Taylw. 

The Patriots have not been blessed 
with a deluge d hits, but they have been 
getting good mileage out of the wies 
they have banged out. Against Granby. 
the Patriots got seven runs on just six 
hits with a suicide squeeze bringii^ 
home the deciding run. 

The Patriots need to win both game* 
this wedi to keep pace with the other 
traders. 

KELLAM 

Kellam is another surprise team of 
the spring. The Knights are <rff to a 4-1 
start and opened their league season 
last week with a win over Cox. 

The Knights have a slow week with a 
home test against Lake' Taylor on 
Friday afternoon the only scheduled 
game. The Knights and the Titans have 
yet to meet this season. 

A transfer from Rhode Island has 
|x-ovided the loudest noise, during the 
Beach baseball season so far. Joe 
Kwasny has hurled two one-hit 
shutouts, and has stnickout 29 tutters 
in just 15 innings. When Kwasny is not 
on tne mound, Kicn boxom has been 
picking up the slack with some 
excellent relief wo'-k. 



It has been a light hitting season for 
most Beach hitters this spring. The 
Kellam batters have not been befelled 
by the early season hitting doldrums, 
avffl-aging better than five runs a 
cwitest 

The pitching and the hitting should 
continue, and the Knights should make, 
the Titans league vicUm number two. 

KEMPSVILLE 

The king is down, but can not be 
counted out so early. The Chiefs loss to 
Bayside makes their task all the more 
tougher, but they won the district with a 
9-1 mark a year ago. 

Coach Ray Barlow is still blessed 
with one of the more talented mound 
corps in the city. No team has reached 
Kempsville pitching for an inordinate 
amount of hits. Only one time has the 
Chief starter not been around at the 
finish. Righthander Jimmy Moore, 
despite suffering his first defeat of the 
season, still hurled his third straight 
complete game last week. 

The Chiefs will be in the friendly 
surroui^dings of (heir own ball yard in 
seeking to rebound from their stunning 
defeat, princess Anne on Wednesday 
and Cox on Friday are the defending 
state champion's challengers this 
week. Neither team has been 
exceptionally proficient at the plate so 



far. In a pitchers' duel, Kempsville has 
a decided edge. 

PRINCESS ANNE 

Princess Anne is another local team 
infected with a hitting slump. The 
Cavaliers are off to an 0^2 start overall 
and dropped their first district 
appearance to Lake Taylor last 
Thursday. 

The Cavaliers have scored in only one 
of their first 14 innings and are 
averaging only one run a game with 
five hits on the season. Prirress Anne 
will have three shots to brfek out of 
their slump this week. Following the 
Wednesday game with Kempsville, the 
Cavaliers travel to Booker T. 
Washington on Friday and to Bayside 
on Tuesday. 

The Princess Anne mound staff has 
(Mtched well with no rewards. Dave 
Weldon has been impressive in his first 
two outings, but is 0-2 on the season. 

9 

The Cavaliers have never had a 
losing season under Coach Don Van 
Benschoten. This week's busy schedule 
could go a long way in deciding whether 
that streak will Continue, The young 
Cavalier team has been hampered by 
numerous raij^ outs. The youngsters are 
getting their baptism of fire under 
league competition. The sink or swim 
principle in its simplest form. 



Chiefs find Red Wing ii/ceabie 



The Red Wing golf course and 
Kempsville are getting along 
just fine, thank you. 

Last year's Eastern District 
bridesmaids to defending state 
champion Princess Anne won 
an Eastern District 
quadrangular golf match 
Thursday at Red Wing with a 
team total of 295. Kellam 
finished 13 strokes back in 
second with a score (rf 308. 



Bayside and Cox were well oif 
the pace with team totals <rf 354 
and 362, respectively. 

The Chief's triumph was 
keyed by their number one 
player Roger Savage, who 
carded the day's low-score with 
a four-under par 68. It was the 
second straight week Savage 
had bested par on the Red Wing 
course. Perhaps the best golfer 



in the region. Savage has yet to 
have a round over par this 
season. He was the picture of 
consistency Thursday with two- 
under par 34's for both nines. 

Teammates Tommy Cullens 
(79). Jim Ballew (75) and Kory 
Demun (73) backed up Savage's 
effort. Demun equaled the best 
nine holes of the day with a 34 



PA netmen, stay hot; 
Falcons notch 2nd win 



Last week saw only limited 
action for city tennis teams with 
only four matches being played. 

Thursday, Princess Anne 
upped their winning stroik to 
six in a row with an easy 6-3 
triumph over Kellam. The 
Cavaliers have yet to lose a 
match this season. 

. The Cavaliers clinched the 
victory, taking five of the six 
singles matches. Torn Callan 
and Rich Banta continued their 
unbeaten play both winning in 
straight sets. 

THE KNIGHTS are now 1-2 on 
the season. 

Princess Anne was also 
impressive on April 10 sweefKng 



Bayside 9-0 for an Eastern 
District win. For the Marlins, it 
was the second time in two 
weeks they had been shutout by 
a city team. Kempsville was the 
previous 9-0 winner over the 
Marlins. 

Also on April 10, Cox defeated 
Norfolk Catholic 6-3, and 
Kempsville downed Craddock 
in a non-league match 7-2. 

For the Falcons, it was their 
second straight win, recovering, 
from a bad start. Cox wrapped 
up the decision by sweeping the 
six singles matches. All but one 
(rf the singles victories came in 
straight sets. The Falcons 
twmber one player Steve Barry 
was the most impressive, 
coasting to a 6-1, 6-1 win. 



KEMPSVILLE IMPROVED 

their overall record to 5-1 with 
the easy triumph over 
Southeastern District 
representative Craddock. The 
Chiefs took all six singles 
matches in an impressive 
performance. 

Senior Nick O'Hara improved 
his individual record to 5-1 with 
a 6-2, 6-1 win. KempsviUe's 
brilliant sophomore duo of Dave 
Brandt and Billy Miller 
continued their fine play, 
winning 6-4, 6-2 and 6-1, 6-2. 
respectively. The two Chief 
sophomores have a combined 
record of 12-0 this season. 

Kempsville is 2-1 in the 
district. 






Sports Record' 



This Week 

WEDNESDAY 

Baitbill— PrincMS Anne at Kempsville 

Track— Booker T. Washington a« Princess 
Anne 

Norview at Cox 

First Colonial at Maury 

Kellam at Kempsville 

Tennis— Granby at Bayside 

Cox at Princess Anne 

Booker T. Washington at Kellam 

Norview at First Colonial 

THURSDAV 

OoH— Bayside, Cox First Colonial and 
Lake Taylor at Stumpy Lake 

Kellam. Booker T. Washington and 
Granby at Ocean View 

Kempsville. Maury and Norview at 
Ocean View 

FRIDAV 

Baseball- Lake Taylor at Kellam . 

Maury at Bayside 
Cox at Kempsville 
Norview at First Colonial 
Princess Anne at Booker T. 
Washington 

Tennis— Bayside at Maury 

Granby at Cox 

Princess Anne at Kempsville 

Kellam at Norview 

niESOAV 

Baseball— Princess Anna at Bayside 

■ Kempsville at Maury 

First Colonial at Lake Taylor 
Granby at Co* 

tewtls— Cox at Mairy 

Granby a» Kempsville 

Booker T. Washington at Bayside 

Kellam at Firu Colonial . 

; Ijist W»el€ 

•otf— Kermnville TVS, Kellam 3M, Bayside 
IM ma Cox M7 



Norfolk Catholic 
Kellam 



051 000 0- « St 
MJ JOO 1-7 6 1 



Kempsville 

Moore IL.2 1) 



7 



SansoneandMtgrl. AAayo, Bloxom (})and 
Laydan. W- Bloxom 111), L-Sansone (0- 



EASTERN DISTRICT 

HIGH SCHOOL 

BASEBALL STANDINGS 

WON LOST PCT. GB 



Granby 
First Colonial 



»» 000 30- S 10 2 
700 no II- t 8 7 



Woodhouseand Fogua. Doss, Sadowski (7) 
and Swecker. W- Sadowski (1-01, L~ 
Woodhouse n 1). 



Kellam 
ab r 

RbckJb 
Lydnc 
Mrrssy lb 
Kwaviy p 
RdsSb 
Wgnrcf 
Andrsn rf 
Foxrl 
Crtr ss 
Ldvk If 
Totals 



n bi 

3 10 
'2 00 1 
3 10 
3 10 
2 110 

2 10 
20 1 
10 

3 12 1 
10 11 

2S 4 



'l^' 



Cox 
ab 

Zmmrly II 

PynJb 

Noep 

Bsnghtct 

Hqsd3b 

Addsn lb 

Rttrrf 

Ndhmss 

Khirc 

Brttn p 

Totals 



r h bl 
3 000 
30 10 

2 000 

3 000 
3 

2 
2 
2 000 
2 
100 

22 1 



KELLAM 

BAYSIDE 

FIRST COLONIAL 

B T Washington 

LakeTaylor 

Maury 

Norview 

PRINCESS ANNE 

KEMPSVILLE 

COX 

Granby 



1.000 - 

1.000 - 

1.000 

1000 - 

1000 

.000 ' 

000 '; 

.000 1 

.000 I 

.000 I 

.000 1' 



Tennis 



KeHam 
Cox 

E-Needham2. LOB 
Luvik SF- Layden, 



Kwasny (W- 2 0) 
Noe(L-0U 
Brat ton 

Bayside 



ab 

Lhmn c 

Osbrn ct 

Wsnrp 

MoorrI 

Kgr3b 

Tynr 1( 

Trkntnlb 

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lotals 



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Bayside 

Kempsville 



r h bl 

2 I Wt 
2)00 

3 2 1 
3 I 2 1 

2 
<3«00 

300 

3 110 
7» < 5 3 



001 300 0-4 
000 000 0-0 

COX 1, Kellam 3. S- 

Anderson. 

IPNRBRBBSO 

7 1 14 

3 3 2 2 1 

4 3 2 2 1 1 

Kempsville 

ab r h bi 

3 10 



Moorp 

HnsnSb 

Pftss 

O'Hrarf 

Hrrsnlf 

Crnc 

Smth lb 

WIch CI 

Lrkwc;2b 

Earp ph 

Crbtrpr 

Wick pr 

Totals 



4 10 
3 
3 0)0 
2 12 
2 10 
10 
2 1 
10 
10 00 


22 1 « 1 



200 Oil 4 
.010 000 I 



e Price. Welch DP Bayside J LOB 
Kempsville I, Bayside 3 SB - Osborne 
2. Price, CraWree S Smith?. TynerSF 
Welch 



IP N « ER BB SO 



BayiMa 

Weisner (W, I 0) 



Bas^baM 



Cox t Norfolk Catholic 3 

Singles — S Barry (C) d Castro, 6 C6 I; 

Freeman (C) d. Cash, 7 6, 6 3, 

Sun IC) d Primm, 6 4, 67. 

Waddell (C) d Veith, 6 1, 60, 

M Barry (C) d Ellis, 6 1, 6 2. 

Aspinwal IC) d Gambal, 6 7, 6 1, 6 1 
OouWes — Kusialc Castro (NO d. Barry 
Barry, 6 4, 6 J. 

Cash Primm (NO d Freeman Sun, 6 3, 
6 3. 

Dojey Vcilh (NO d Waddell Aspinwal, 
6 2, 7 6 

Kempsville 7 Craddock 2 

Singles — OHara ( K ) d Sellers, 6 2, 6 1; 
Brandt (K) d Smith, 6 4, 6 2, 
Miller (Kl d Dom, 6 1, 6 2, 
Riondel (Kid Loehr, 6 4, 4 6, 6 3, 
Minschke (K) d ParrOn, 6 3, 6 1, 
Beaton (K)dP Smith, 6 3. 3 6, 6 2 

Doubles — O'Hara Miller (K) d Sellers 

Loehr, 6 2, » 1: > 

Dorn Smith (C)d Hamill Minschke. 6 7, 

6 1, 6 1. 
Parron P Smith d C Milchell J 

Mitchell, 5 7, 6 4, <Jj;- 

Princess Anne 6 Kellam 1 

V 

Singles — Hunter (PA) d Riclardion. 6 2, 
6 1; 

Callen (PA) d Stephens, 6 2. 6 1. 

Johnson (Kid Sell. 6 3, 7 6. 

Kerner (PAI d Allemand, 6 4, 5 7, 6 3, 

Banta 'PAI d venner, 6 1, 6 2. 
OovMes — Hunter Callen (PA) won by 
lorfeit; 

Richardson AllemandlKtd Self Banta. 
4 6. 6 4. 7 6, 

Barclay Leamon (Kl d Courtney 
Carlin, 6 3, 2 6, 6 J 



Mha Taylor 100 000 2 3 7 1 

Vrlncess Anot 000 000 0- 3 3 

Sharp and Boll WbMan and Sawyer, W- 

tearp II 0), L- WeiMn (O-I) 



; VIRGINIA ttp 


BWCT ▼ 


[ENGMVING & .^^ 


: TROPHY W. ^^ 


: Machine Ei^wloi 
. Ci*l|A.ltoBliiiiii«»y. 

496lltalMdM.liiiMC 



over the back nine holes. 

Kellam's second place rffort 
was keyed by John Dozier and 
Billy Wollaril. Dozier carded a 
two-over par 74. while Wollard 
posted a Knight low of 73, 
Wollard's team-leading rffort 
was aided by <i one-under par 35 
on the back nine. Tommy 
Hardee (77) and Artie Watkins 
(83) completed the Kellam 
effort, 

A youthful Bayside team had 
their troubles on the Red Wing 
course, Pete Keeline. the 
Marlins' only senior, carded a 
90, Promising freshman John 
Anderson was Bayside's low 
man with an 85. Coach Conrad 
Parker'ssophomoreduo of Don 
Newhart and Larry Reidnour 
posted scores of 87 and 92. 
respectively. 

Cox was another team which 
experienced a great deal of 
difficulty. Falcon Tom 
Shanahan carded his team's 
lowest score with a seven over- 
par79, Scott Coleman and Steve 
Spartz followed with scores of 86 
and 88. For Cox's Guy Newbury 
nothing went right. The Falcon 
carded the match's highest 
score with a 110. 



BOAT 

OWNER 

READ 

THIS! 





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OF OUTBOARD, INBOARDS, 
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YOUR LIABILITY TO OTHERS 
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MEDICAL PAYMENTS 

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n^ A-M-The SMn-WodBMiIty, A|Bi 17, 1974 






Noel Daly Sawyer, a 
student at Tidewater 
Community Collie, has 
found the perfect job. 
She's known as a rider for 
Don and Carol Webb's, 
horse farm on Princess 
Anne Road in Back Bay. 
As a rider, she gets to 
combine work witii play 
as she sees to the horses' 
care and feeding while 
riding them for exercise. 
Noel takes one of tte 
horses out fac exercise in 
top left (dioto. ^^ top 
right, she pauses while 
cleaning out the horse 
stall. A light breaking 
carriage in . the 
foreground at left is used 
to train horses to (Mill 
equipment. China, a 
mare, shows off her 
velvety nose at Iowct left. 
At lower right, Noel 
shows how to "lunge" a 
horse as she puts Lie 
Penny, who is about to 
foal, through her paces. 
^Lunging is a practical 
way to exercise a horse 
without riding it. Noel 
works hard at the Webb 
farm but finds a special 
reward in being able to 
ride her four-legged 
friends as part of the job. 
A rider knows... 




It's not Just work; 
tt's horsing around 




^ 



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Sun photos 
bf Rod Mann 




MfliMHHftMakMHHM 



•^ 



I 



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a 



sunoiiiL 



iiff€Styl€s 



BRIDe« 



Barriers to handicapped coming 



9 9 



wn 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun SUff Writer 

Most persons take a fUgbt (d stairs for granted, 
tliey don't consider that those stairs qan be a 
[jorper to a handicapped person. But, Margaret 
kei^ter of Virginia Beach is making area cities take 
notice. 

Heading a (rganization called Mobility on Wheels 
(MOW). Ms. Keister is out to rid Tidewater Of 
architectural barriers which prevent haixlicapped 
persons from joiiiing in community activities. She 
appeared before the Virginia Beach City Council 
about two months ago to tell the councilmen of the 
handicapped person's plight. 

At that meeting she pointed out to the Council 
that even the municipal building was inacc^sable 
to the handicapped— the ramp for wheelchairs 
(which the city carefully included in the con- 
struction of the building) is too steq) for most 
handicapped persons. None of the building's 



restrooms are quipped to handle whedchairs, and 
there are m) extra wide ami specially marked 
handit^ped laHdng spaces in the parking lot. 

Ms. Keister said that the barriers to mobility <rf 
the handicapped existed throughout the Tidewater 
cities— in sctwols, librari^, ba^s, the hospital and 
other Coimmunity centers, as weU as. in private 
office buildings. The Beach government has been 
working With Ms. Keister and plans to des^ futis-e 
munici(»i buildings with the handicapped in mind, 
as well as to encourage the city's bulld«^ to comply 
with tbe Des^n Standards for Handicapp^ Access 
set down by the American Institute of Architects. 

THE CITY PLANS modification of all municipal 
parking lots to provide marked oversized parking 
spaces, at least 15 feet wide, close to the entrance of 
all buildings in the municipal center complex. 
(Special signs wiU be placed in fr<Mit of the 
buildings which have been modified to ac- 
conunodate handicapped persons in wheelchairs.) 
The parking lot at Mt. Trashmwe will also be 



des^ned with special parkmg spaces and ramps for 
the handicapped. Modifications will begin as soon 
as possible and wiU be completed as funds are 
available. 

As in'ovided for in the Virginia State Code, special 
ivivileges will be given to those persons with the 
HP (handicapped person) and DV (disabled 
veteran) pr^ix on their automobile license plate 
number. Handicapped persons will be allowed to 
park on the wrong side <tf the sh-eet if necessary to 
get in and (Hit oi their cars and they will not be 
subject to fine for an expired parking meter. 

The Department of Parks and Recreation will 
inclucte activities in their regular programs for the 
handicapped. These will not be a special set of 
programs for only the handicapped. 

WHEN REVIEWING site plans, the engineering 
division of the city's Community Services 
Department will require that all paricing lots 
provide one IS-foot parking space per 50 regular 



spaces. In addition, ramps or^milar type access 
will be required from all lots to^jacent buildings. 
Commercial establishments wlr^be required to 
have reslroom facilities designed f<» easy access to 
'persons in wheelchairs. \ 

Assistant City Manager Geoi^e Ifcinbury, who 
has been working with MOW, saj^^tructural 
modifications also will be made in ahlwiols and 
all new schools will be equipped to haMN hand- 
icapped students. 

"I think the City Council recognizes Uiat there is a 
definite problem now," says Mr. Hanbury. "People 
just aren't aware, and nobody thinks about the 
situation." 

MOW had considered asking the four area cities 
for a monetary grant. Mr. Hanbury says Virginia 
Beach has discouraged that request and fe^Is 
"there are many things the city can do other than 
coming up with a monetary figure, such as making 
people aware of the architectural problems and 
working to change them." 




\ KNIFE at the throat h the lot 
of Fran Petersen as Carlino 
when three criminals have a 
fallint; out in the Virginia Beach 
Little Theatre production of 



•Wait Until Dark." Cast as the 
other criminals who terrorize a 
hiind c^irl are Paul Davis as 
Mike (left) and Tony Smith as 
Roat. 



Suspense drama set 
forLhtle Theatre 



The murder mystery "Wait UniU 
Dark" will open Friday at the 
Virginia Beach Little Theatre, 24th 
Street and Barberton Drive.- 

The story of a blind girl trying to 
escape from three criminals who 
have taken over her apartment, the 
Beach production of "Wait Until 
Dark" stars Anne Thornal as Susy, 
the blind girl. Paul Davis, Tony 
Smith and Fran Petersen are cast 
as the three criminals. Al 
Oifewniog plays Susy's husband 
Sam and Terry Nixon is the litUe 
girl who lives upstairs. 

The Little Theatre show is undes 
the direction of Ruth Sherman with 
Paul Gaddis as technical director. 



The set has been designed by Bob 
Coulsting. Other backstage crew 
members include Phyllis Driscoll, 
set decor; David Lively, stage 
manager; Randy Abbey ^nd 

Marcia Bartusiak, lights: Randy 
McClellon, sound; and Bettianne 
Smith and Linda Petersen, props. 

The play will be on stage 
Fridays' Saturdays and Sundays 
through May 4. Curtain time is 8:30 
p.m. Ff,y}ays and Saturdays and 3 
p.m. for the Sunday matinees. 
Ticket prices are $3 for adults and 
$1.50 for students and military. 
Reservations may be made by 
calling the theatre at 428-9523. 



Dance delights 
scant audience 



-Revi(B^A# 



Tht loffny 11 baUet company performed Monday night at 
Chrysler Hall, Norfolk. The company, a youth ensemble, Is an 
offspring of th* Jofflty BaUet of the New York Qty 
American Ballet Center. 



The Jeffrey II dance ensemble came to Norfolk with a 
dance program designed wltti something for everyone. 
Unfortunately, almost everyone missed it. 

Performing before a scant audience of about 200 
persons, the Joffrey II dancers demonstrated Uieir ability 
to communicate through dance— be it light-hearted dance 
routines, free ballet or classical ballet forms. Not only 
were the dancers masterful, the program was 
entertaining. 

Perhaps the most energetic group of young dancers to 
hit the stage, die Joffrey dancers captured their small 
audience early in the performance. Dancing to music 
from the album "Two Beat Mozart." the group presented 
a series of light-hearted jazz routines. Combining various 
leaps and lifts, the ensemble sten>ed well to the lively 
tempo of the music. Their only real problem came when 
the entire group was performing the same lift or dance 
step at the same time. What appeared as though it should 
have been in unison was not. 

THE COMPANY, however, eanir back afMr^ the first 
intermission with a strong second number — perhaps the 
best4:horeographed and most polished of all the dance 
presentations. With choreography by NOTbert Vesak and 
music by Sameul Barber, the ensemble danced smoothy 
to "Knoxville: Summer of 1915." 

The moodiness of the music and the movements ot the 
dancers left the ballet easily interpreted by all audience 
members. Nancy Thuesen. who at one time danced with 
the Dance Guild of Virginia, performed well in this 
modem ballet dealing with "the inability <A adults to 
recapture tl»ir childhoods." The music and the dancers 
flowed from expressions of bewilderment, confrontation, 
loveand eventual embracing of childhood. Many audience 
members seemed to prefer this performance over the 
others. Perhaps it is because it (Merei someOiing with 
which Uiey could identify. 

Clad in pastel costumes, the ensemble dancers also 
moved elegantly tiirough ttte different movements of 
Robert Shimann's "Opus 6," performing solo, pas de 
deux or as a group. Ttiis was the only classical ballet 
(rffering of the evening. The dancers were accompanied 
by Ndl Stannard on the piano. (Music for all other 
performances was pre-taped.) 

THE -lOFFREY DANCERS capped off the evening 
with a pCTformance they called "Facade" with music by 
William Walton. The costuming for Uie pr^entation was 
excellent. The audience laughed at the take-offs and 
exaggerations of the Charleston, ttie "soft-shoe" tap 
dance and the tango in this adapted ballet p«iormance. 

Though definitely up and coming professi(mals in Uie 
dance world, the Joffrey II dancers were not without their 
faults. Members <rf the company occassionally were 
thrown off balance and missed a lift or two. 

But the main thing the Joffr«y ensemble missed in 
Norfolk was the audience. The turn-out for the 
performance is one that will have to go down in history as 
one of the worst. Thou^ those present seemed delighted 
with the performance, they, like the dancers, were 
conscious of the smallness (^ the audience. 

The slim turn-out must certaiiiy say something about 
die pec^rie of the area and mal^ one wonder if Norf<*c or 
Virginia Beach is ready for professional arts 
entertainment. 



— LiHda Miller 




TfIR WILY IVfusfc Man, played 
hv Carl Ralckmann of Bayside 
High, wnos the town librarian, 
nlavod. hv Anita Hammer of 
Kemnsville High, when the two 



schools present a foint musical 
prndiirtion of Meredith 
Wilson's musical comedy "The 
Music Man" at both schools. 
(Sun photo hv Linda Miller). 



High schools combiner 
for The Music l^an ' 



The "trouble" won't be in River 
City, but right here in the resort 
city when Bayside and Kempsville 
High Schools students combine 
talents to present the Meredith 
Wilson musical comedy "The 
Music Man" Thursday and 
Saturday. 

For the first time in the history of 
the two schools, Bayside and 
Kempsville High departments are 
working together to present a 
public program. The band, chorus 
and drama departments have been 
rehearsing the play, alternating 
schools for the practices, for the 
past few weeks. The show is under 
the direction of Pat Bernick 
(KempsviHe drSma teacher) and 
Faye Whitlock (Bayside music 
teacher). Joe Ligart is the band 
director. 



Carl Baickmann of Bayside High 
stars as Professor Harold Hill, the 
music man, Marian Paroo, his 
sweetheart and the town librarian, 
is played by Kempsville High 
School student Anita Hammer. 
Other principal cast members 
include Mark Williams (Mar- 
cellus), Pam Falls (Mrs. Paroo), 
Jeff Beaton (Mayor Shinn). 
.Sherrill Williams (Mrs. Shinn) and 
Jose Meredith (Winthrop). 

The play will be on stage 
Thursday at Kempsville High and 
.Saturday at Bayside High. Curtain 
time Is 8 p.m. for both per- 
lormarices. Tickets ap^)$!.50. 
Reservations may be made by 
calling Bayside High at 499-1285. 
extension .'i. no later than Thurs- 
day. 




'Offs fit for ti^e devil 



0Sfi 



My husband is a saver of old clothes. 

Out HI the prage. hai^ir^ on nails, stuffed in 
cupboards and flung on the floor are enough old 
pants and shirts to opm a boutique for sl(*s, 
became his old clothes sffe not the sort of faddishly 
faded jeans and woinlerfully wrinkled shirts that 
make Steve McC^aeen look so devil-jnay-care. They 
just make a man look like the devil. 

But he WMi't part with any oi them no matter what 
I try — and I've tried ptenty. "Wtat do you want 
this stuff for? ' ' I asked oily last week, and hdd up a 
pile <rf rags only an arsoint wouM luve any ise for. 

"<iIVK MK TH«»E!" crW my hsband, and 
snatched the bundle mrt of my arms like a mcrther 
saving her tebe from a kidnaper. "I'm gdi^ to 
wear those when 1 |»int the im^ of the showw." 

I loW him he was al^t as likely to wrar those 
clothes apin as he was to paint the li»i(te of the 




shower. He said he might' want to wear them to 
replant the lawn or take his car apart. 

I reminded Mm^^fhat we don't have a lawn and 
that he camwt evm And the hi^a-key under the 
hool of his car. He smiled sheepishly and tucked 
the^'hirfr wad (rf rap into a box marked "Christ- 



mas lights." 

"Well then." he persisted, 'maybe you'd like to 
wear them when you paint the iiKide ot the 
shower." 

•TM NOT ABOL'T to paint any shower wearing 
a moth-eaten ski sweater and a pair of 1943 Army 
fatigtK pants with a 40-ineh waist." I said. "I'd 
sooner streak than wear a stitch (rf your old 
clothe." 

All in all, I think he wmild too Because the last 
time he lifted a paint brush - six years ago- he 
didn't go near his wardr<^ of crumbly clothes. He 
painted «ir front door orange wearing his new 

tODC(»t. 

"Hey," I said, "you've got undercoat on your 
overcoat." 

"Yeah," he answered, '^uess I'll have to hang it 
in the prage in case I want to ^int tlw shutters to 
match tlw doOT." 

I'm still waiting. 



inside 

Lifestyles 



Bridas B-2 

Sun Dial B-3 

Food B4 

IMigion'. • B-5 



B^ B4-1tK SttB-W^towtey. ^irfl 17. 1974 



I 



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Be sure your friends 
and neighbors know about your 
plans. Announce your 
engagement and wedding in 
The Sun. 

Wedding and engage- 
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may be submitted by mailing 
announcements to "Brides," 



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captured forever in the champagne glass. Color the mood pink, or blue, 
or forevor ambor. For those qjKial moments you want to last forever, 
the cheriihed m«fnories of your wttiding will Inever fade when you have 
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Announcements should be 
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Candid engagement pic- 
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Engagements and weddings 
of Virginia Beach residents only 
^i|l be considered. 



news 



Forms for submitting 
engagement and wedding 
information may be obtained by 
writing to the address above. 
Personal information about the 
bride-to-be and her fiance 
should be included in the 
engagement announcement 
only. 

The deadline for receiving 
announcements is noon Friday 
prior to the week of publication. 




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MRS.LANGE 



La ngC'Etheridge 



MarleneEtheridge and Harry 
Maurice Lange were wed 
March 31 at Charity United 
Methodist Church. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Lee 
Etheridge of Virginia Beach. 
The bridegroom is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Davis 
Lange of Buxton, N.C. 

Ginger Lee was her sister's 
matron of honor. Bridesmaids 
were Owen Henley, Debbie 
Goff, Lynn Dunn and Rebecca 
Sills. 

Harry D. Lange was his sm's 
best man. Ushers were William 
Lee, Grouse Gray, Ken Oden 
and Courtney Whitehead n. 

Susan Hayes was flower girl 
and Courtney Whitehead III 
was ring bearer. 

Thecoufde will reside in Nag$ 
Head. 



Cason 
engagement 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer B. Cascm 
of Virginia Beach announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Emmaline Celestine Cason, to 
Lt. Charles S. Tate Jr., son <rf 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Tate of 
Montross, Va. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of KeUam Hi^ Schod and 
Hampton Institute and is 
currently em(doyed as a speech 
pathol(^ist by the Virginia 
Beach City Public Schools. 

Her fiance hdds a master's 
degree from Hampton Institute 
and serves as race relations 
officer at Ft Monmouth, N.J. 

A JiHie 22 wedding is planned. 



MISS CASON 



MISS CROSS 



^ . The bride-to-be is a seniw at 

Lross engagement cox High schod and employed 

by Best Products Co. Ine. 



Mr. and Mrs. PaulTitxis Cross 
Jr. of Virginia Beach announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter, Lawaria Denise 
Cross, toThcnnas Allen Hill, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. William James 
Hill Jr. of Virf^nia Beach. 



Her fiance is also a sraio- At 
Cox High Schod and employed 
by Lake Shores Exxon. He 
plans to attend Old Doniinim 
University this fall. 

A June 22 wedding date has 
been set 




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Careful planning means 
a serene and happy bride 



Tfc* Sun-Wednetday, AprU 17, 1974-lh«a B-J 



All brides are beautiful, 
but the most brautiftil bride 
is ttie one who sails serenely 
down the afele, secure in the 
kwwled^e ttial evo-y last 
I detail has been taken <^re 

, of. :>. 

Tbe planning is what 

coqnts. A perfectly-planned 

wedding teaves no room for 

laatpminutft. upsets and 

jexdSmations of "CHi, no! 

p/e forgot to invite Aunt 

|Jula!"> , ; 

I Tradition imially dictat#^ 

ftat the bride aoid her 

family assume all weddiAg 

expenses . So most of the 

planning is Qp to the trkte 

and her famfly and friends. 

IN AlX the planning, it's 



best to remember that it's 
the groom 's special day, too. 
TTiere wouldn't be a wed- 
dmg without him but 
brtdegrooms sometime 
seenci to g^ lost bi the 
shufQe of choosing the 
l^ci^'s govwi, ordeHng the 
calM^ and planning -all the 
final detaUs. 

•Hie groom is responsible 
for Ordering his fiancee's 
engagement ring and 
wedding ring. He orders his 
ring, too, if it will be a 
double-ling ceremooy. 

He helps his famil^' draw 
up their part of the guest list 
and visits the clergyman 
who will perform the 
ceremony. 

He chooses the male at- 



SUNDAVS 
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Ink Tnpieil FiNaii, lagiii lakits, Entic 
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Gettint Married 

THEWS NO SASIE* WAVi TO TU«N 
A NtW HOUStHOlDiNTO A 
WAKM HOMt THAN WITH BEAUTI- 
Wt GREEN fOUAOe. AND THEY M 
G«EAT fO« "EMPTY CORNERS' . . . 
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tendants (best man, 
groomsmen) and |ians the 
wedding trip after con- 
suing his fiancee. He or- 
ders his own wedding outfit 
and helps the male at- 
tendants dtoosift what they 
will wear; 

HE ALSO arrange to gd 
the marrisge license and 
checks with his best man on 
travel ainili^em^its, such 
as tranqiortation to the 
airport If the wedding 
couple wfil fly to their 
hcmeymoon destination. 

His friends can help plan 
the bachelor party if there 
will be one. Plans are 
usually made two wedcs 
before the wedding. 

The bridegroom should 
make sure his attendants 
know the dates for rehearsal 
and dinner, if one is plan- 
ned, and make sure the best 
man has the fee for the 
clergyman. 

He is also responsiWe l<x 
choosing and giving gifts to 
his attendants. This is 
usually done at the bachelor 
party. 

THE BRIDE and her 

family have the liwi's share 
(i the planning. A large, 
formal wedding requires 
anywhere from four to 12 
months of planning. Smaller 
weddings need less plan- 
ning 

The bride's choice of gown 
dictates the style of the 
ceremony and how formal 
the day will be. After con- 
sulting with the clergyman 
if a church wedding will be 
performed, the wedding 
date should be set. 

Then the bride should 
decide which friends and 
family will be attendants. 
They need to know in amjie 
time to plan for the event 
and to decide if they can 
assume flie cost of their own 
gowns if necessary. 

A very small wedding 
requires no attendants, or 
just one each for the 
bride and bridegroom. 
Larger, more formal 
weddings usually require a 
matron or maid of honor and 
several bridesmaids. Kp^ 
equal number of male At- 
tendants should be chosen 
by the bridegroom so eatsh 
female member of the ' 
wedding party has a male 
partaer. 

THE BRIDE and her 

family set the number of 
wedding guests since they 
will probably pay for the 
wedding. They should tell 
the bridegroom and his 
family how many guests 
they may invite. 

The reception should be 
planned aseariy as possible. 
The photographer, florist, 
caterer and other 
professionals should be 
contacted well in advance of 
the wedding date. 

Invitatio;is should be 
chosen about three months 
before the wedding to allow 
extra time for addressing 
and mailing. 

Honeymoon plans should 
be made about three months 
ahead of time and the gowns 
for the groom 's mother and 
bride's mother chosen. 

MARRL^GE licaises and 
requred te^ ^oidd be 
obtained about a month 
before the wedding. At the 
same time, (he bride's gown 
should be fitted. 

The iast-minute details 
include fitting ,the at- 
tendants' costumes, 
arranging for the rehearsal 
dinner, ^nnii^ a small 
parly for the bridal at- 
tendants and announcttg 
the wedding io the 
newspaper. 



FOR THE FUTURE 

"THE MIRACLE WORKER" 

by William Gibson is now 
playing at Tidewater Dinner 
Theatre, 6270 Northampton 
Blvd. The show |days nightly 
except Monday. Ticket 
information and reservati<ms 
may be obtained from the 
theatre at 46(M)»3. 

THE SPRING meeting of the 
Tidewater District, Virginia 
Federation of Garden Clubs is 
today at the Admiralty Motel, 
1170 N Military Highway, 
Norfolk. Registration begins at 

9 a.m. with Imsiness meeting at 

10 a.m. 

FILMS for children at the 
Kempsville branch library 
Thursday at 4 p.m. and Friday 
at 10 and 11 a.m. are "Puss in 
Boots" and "Scruffy." 

TIDEWATER chapter of the 
Virginia Society for Human Life 
meets Thursday at 8 p.m. in the 
conference room of Building 11, 
Kogef Executive Center. A film 
on Pro-Life Write Weekly Inc. 
will be shown. 

THE GERMAN all-male 
Wuppertale Kurrende choir will 
perform a concert Thursday at 

11 a.m. in the Virginia 
Westeyan College library. The 
public is invited to attend. 

THE DRAMA "Wait Until 
Dark" opens Friday at the 
Little Theatre of Virginia 
Beach, 24th Street and 
Barberton Drive. It will play 
Fridays and Saturdays at 8: 30 
p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. 
through May 4. Ticket 
information and reservations 
may be obtained by calling the 
theatre at 428-9523. 

CANCER WEEK in Virginia 
Beach begins Friday, through 
April 25. Mayor R<*ert B 
Cromwell -Jr. has proclaimed 
the wed( and announced the 
Cancer Society's educational 
and fund-raising crusade to be 
conducted during the week. 

WOMEN EDUCATORS will 

convene Friday when Alpha 
Delta Kappa, international 
JlfiiWrary sorority for 
outstanding women educators, 
holds its annual convention at 
the Hilton Inn. The three-day 
convention will include guest 
lakers, a musical program 
election of officers. Mayor 
Robert B. CromwellJr., Rep. G 
William Whitehurst and E. 
Bruce^^cGuire, assistant 
superintel^ent, Virginia Beach 
public scHpols, will l>e among 
the speakerS,^ 

LIONS CLUB members of 
Aragona-Pembr(d(e will donate 
special equipment to the Special 
^rvices Division of the Bayside 
Branch library Friday at 1 p.m. 
The equipment for blind patrons 
includes a thermoform machine 
and automatic braille 
reproducer. Invited guests 
include Rep. G. William 
Whitehurst, Mayor Robert B. 
Cromwell Jr. and other city 
officials. 

KEMPSVILLE HIGH 

School's second annual career 
l^ogram, "Careers Unlimited," 
will be Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. in the school gymnasium. 
Representatives of education, 
business and military will 
{H-esent (areer information. 

"APRIL IN PARIS" is the 

theme (rf the Cape Henry" School 
"happening" Saturday from 10 
a.m. to3 p.m. at the school, 1320 
First Colonial Road. The day 
includes a raffle, auction, 
games, booths selling baked 
goods, toys and art. Art Daniels, 
local artist, will draw charcoal 
portraits. Proceeds will 
purchase bleachers for the 
sch«d gymnasium. 

FILMS for children Sahirday 
at 11 a.m. are "Sleeping Beauty 
and Briar Rose," "Ballet Girl" 
and "Walter, the Lazy Mouse" 



GETTING 



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at the Virginia Beach tntinch 
lilH-ary |dus "Sunken Treasure" 
and "Big Lighthouse and Little 
Steamship" at the Windsor 
Woods branch. 

A SPRING Flea Maiicet will 
be at Princess Anne High 
School, 4400 Virginia Beach 
Blvd., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 
4 p.m. Individuals, clubs and 
dealers will participate. The 
Princess Anne Drill Team will 
sponsor the event to raise 
transpo-tation money to the 
Apple Blossom Festival in 
Winchester. Rain date is April 
27. 

THE LAMAZE method of 
natural childbirth will be shown 
in a film Saturday at 10 a.m. at 
the Village Inn Pizza Parlor, 
Janaf Shopping Plaza, Norf(dk. 
The film is sponsm-ed by the 
Tidewater Childbirth Educators 
Association. 

THE FIRST state conference 
of the National Organizatimi fw 
Women (NOW) will be Saturday 
and Sunday in Kaufman Hall <A 
Old Dominion \Jniversity. Guest 
speakers and workshops will 
explore the organization's 
national goal of ^female 
equality. The public is invhed^o 
attend the two-day event. 

.."COPELIA" will be^ 
performed by the Old Dominion 
University Ballet Company 
Saturday through April 27 in the 
ODU Technology Theatre. 
Performance times and ticket 
information may be obtained by 
calling the university at 489-8000. 
ext. 291, 292. 

THE SINGING Monarchs of 
Old Dominion University will 
present their annual spring 
concert Sunday at 4 p.m. in 
ODU's Technology Theatre. 
The concert is open to the public 
free of charge. 

PETS will compete in a 
children's pet show sponsored 
by the public libraries Sunday 
at 2 p.m. in the park behind the 
Kempsville branch library, 832 
Kempsville Road. Children 7 to 
14 are eligible to participate. 
Judges will be Del. Glenn B. 
McClanan, Walter Hanbury of 
the city's parks and recreation 
department,, t^'and Lloyd 
Grimstead, Beacon editor. 
Additional information may be 
obtained from the libraries' 
children's coo-din&tor, 340-2987. 

CAREER decision making 
skills will be explored in an 
eight-week evening course 
beginning Monday at Tidewater 
Community College, Virginia 
Beach campus. The course is 
open to the public. Additional 
information may be obtained 
from the college counseling 
center, 428-0055. 

MARY BARRACO, recipient 
of the George Washington 
Honor Medal, will speak on 
faith, courage, love and unity 
Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the 
meeting of the First 
Presbyterian Church Young 
Women's Circle at the church, 
36th Street and Pacific Avenue. 

WARREN BRIDGES will 
present a senior flute concert 
Tuesday at 8:15 p.m. in Old 
Dominion University's 
Technology Theatre. The 
concert is open to the public free 
of charge. 

ISRAELI journalist 
Elimelech Ram will speak on 
"Israel; A Nation of 
Immigrants" April 24 at noon in 
the Arts and Letters Auditorium 
of Old Dominion University. The 
speech is open to the public free 
cf charge. 

CBS NEWS commentator and 
sportswriter Heywood Hale 



Broim will ^ak at U a.m. 
April 24 in the Old Dominion 
University Health and Physical 
Education Building 
gymnasium. The speech is apvn 
to the public free of charge. 

A COMEDY in two acts, 
"Ready When Ypu Are, C.B.!," 
will be presented by the 
Chesapeake Little Tlieatre 
April 2S-May 4 at 8; IS p.m. at 
the Deep Creek Community 
Center, 211 George Washington 
Highway North. Ticket 
information and reservatims 
may be obtained by calling 543- 
6851, ext. 297, or 421-3238. 

THE HONORABLE J. 

William Middendorf 11, under 
secretary (rf the Navy, will 
speak at the Azalea Festival 
luncheon (April 25 at Holiday 
Inn-Scope. Tickets may be 
obtained by calling the Norfdk 
Chamber of Commerce, 
women's division, (25-1266. 

THE RED CROSS 

Bloodmobile will visit Cox High 
School April 26 (9 a.m. -2 p.m.) 
and J.C. Penney Co., Military 
Circle Shoppif^ Center April 29 
(9 a.m. - 3 p.m.) Blood donors 
are urgently needed. Volunteers 
from the Ocean Park Woman's 
Club will serve as nurses aides 
and in the canteen. 

CSHOP on human 
relatioiisT' "Learning for 
Decision Making" will be April 
26 and 27 at Norfolk State 
College. Registration fee is $20. 
Additional information may be 
obtained by calling Hampton 
Roads Personnel and Guidance 
Association at 441-2713. 

A CARNIVAL at W.T. Cooke 
Elementary School, sponsored 
by the PTA, will be April 27 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the 
school, 524 15th Sf. Games, a 
cake walk, refreshments and a 
Mother's Day boutique for 
children will be included. 

THE NAACP Virginia Beach 
branch third annual 
membership banquet will be 
April 28 ate p.m. at the Cavalier 
Oceanfront. Dinner tickets are 
$10 and may be obtained from 
any branch (rfficer. 

CHILDREN of St. Judes 
Children's Research Hospital in 
Memphis will benefit from 
proceeds of the Epsilon Sigma 
Alpha-sponsored Million Dollar 
Bike Ride April 28. Bike riders 
are asked to secure sponsors for 
the 15-miie ride starting at the 
Kempsville branch library. 
Additional information may be 
obtained from Joyce Mitchell at 
424-3232. 

NAVY WIVES are invited to 
the Nimitz Enlisted Wivfes' Club 
meeting April 29 at 7 p.m. at the 
Ship 'n Shore Wives' Club, 
Naval Operations Base, 
Norfolk. A program on fire 
prevention will be included. 
Additional information may be 
obtained from Lois Adama at 
487-7358, 

A DESSERT-BRIDGE of the 
Driftwood Circle of the Kings 
Daughters will be April 30 at 10 
a.m. at Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Church, 207 18th St. 
Tickets of f 2 include coffee and 
dessert. Ticket information 
may be obtained from Doris 
Merrick at 428-3235. 

FOR THE RECORD 

BLUE BIRDS and Camp Fire 
Girls held their traditional 
father-daughter dinner recently 
at the Virginia Beach Civic 
C«itcr (Dome). Approximately 
475 fathers, daughters and troop 
leaders attended. "A Journey 
Tlirough Fantasyland" was the 
theme of the event. 

^WELCOME WAGON Club 



members celebrated the arrival 
<rf spring recently with a fashion 
show and card party. Members 
modeled fashions made by club 
memlwrs. Proceeds from the 
event were donated to the 
Seatack Community Center. 

JOHN YEVICK. assistant 
cubmaster, entertained at Cub 
Scout Pack 434'8 recent meeting 
with a "prisoner's escape'' rope 
trick. James Taylor and Kelly 
Todd were received into the 
pack. Anita Ellibee was 
welcomed as den leader coach 
apd Bill Maull as pack 
committee member. 

I.OCAL MEMBERS of the 



Virginia Society, Daughters of 
the American Colonists, 
recently attended ^ 53rd 
annual general assembly of the 
natl^l society in Washington, 
D.C. Attending were Mrs. 
Bernard F. White, state regent; 
Mrs. James J. Gregory, state 
corresponding secretary, and 
Mrs. Jraepm-D. Deal, national 
organizing ^aM^retary, all of 
Virginia Bebfilr 

Item may hi ikibmitted to Sun 
Dial by mail. Please mail your not- 
ice to Sun Dial, yir/dnia Beach Sun 
lis Rosemont Road. VIrgtitia Beach 
Va. 23452. Deadline is noon Fri- 
day prior to the week of public-' 
atim. 



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Page B4-The Suri Wednesday, AprU 1 7, 1974 

Azalea Ball helps 
Arts Center plan 



The Virginia Beach Arts 
Center's planned historical 
project for bicentennial year 
festivities will be just one of 
many local programs and 
projects to benefit indirectly 
from this year's International 
Azalea Festival and Bail. 

The Azalea Festival is held in 
Norfolk each year to honor the 
North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization (NATO). The ball 
is the highlight of the festival. 

This year's ball will be co- 
sponsored by the Jui^r League 
of Norfolk-Virgin!^ Beach and 
the International Azalea 
Festival Committee of the 
Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

TIIK ll'NIOR I.KAGUE uses 
its sha re of ball proceeds to fund 
community projects in the 
Tidewater area. This year the 




PETER DUCHIN 



■»dv. 



FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

By PAUL ROMAN 

Leftover onion or garlic dip? 
Add a little milk and 
mayonnaise to make it thin 
enough to pour over a tossed 
salad. You'll be surprised. 



Lemons will yield twice the 
juice if heated in the oven or 
boiling water before 
squeezing. 

Roll sau89ges in flour before 
frying, they will have a 
better flavor and will not 
burst during cooking. 



FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
MEAL • SPECIALIZING 
IN CHARBROILED 
STEAKS, MEXICAN FOOD 
AND LOW, LOW PRICES 
- TRY THE 




400 LASKIN ROAD 



league |dans to donate funds 
and volunteers to the V;|rginia 
Beach Arts Center to create a 
local history display at the Arts 
Center gallery on Arctic 
Avenue. 



The display will open in June 
1975, one year prldr" to the 
planned nationwide festivities 
honoring the country's 200th 
birthday. 

The display will portray the 
history of the Virginia Beach 
area from 1607 to 1976 using 
artifacts, historical objects 
borrowed from private citizens 
and local and stale historical 
societies, painted panels, visual 
aids and special works 
commissioned by local artists 
depicting local history. 

A ROOKI.RT WILL be written 
especially fw the historical 
pt'Qject containing a brief 
history of the area. 

Since most components (rf the 
exhibit will be portable, it can 
be taken to the public schools 
and used for promotional 
purposes by the* city, 
government and the Chamber 
(rf Commerce. 

Junior League volunteers will 
help organize and research the 
exhibit, plan the booklet and 
serve as guides for visitors to 
the Arts Center exhibit. 

The Azalea Ball will be April 
27 at the Scope Convention Hall. 
Peter Duchin and his orchestra 
will entertain. Ticket 
information may be obtained 
from Willette LeHew, 423-1313. 



For tha' personal touch 

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FOOD 



High food prices may be 



blessing for over-eaters 



Pianist performs 

David Almgren, 20-vear-old Virginia Beach 
rtianist, will perform Friday at 8 p.m. at the 
rhrvsler Museum Theatre. The young 
musician was recently voted outstandii|g 
nianist in a competition at the University of 
Mnrvtand. where he is in his junior year. 
Tickets for Friday's program of works by 
Beethoven.. Spriabine and Chopin are $1, 
available at the theatre. 

'April in Paris' is 
'liappening' theme 



Cape Henry School's "April in 
Paris" event Saturday is a 
carnival happening with a 
raffle, silent auction, booths, 
games, baked goods and art. 

The annual "happening" at 
the school, 1320 First Colonial 
Road, will be from 10 a.m. to 3 
p.m. Students are now busy 
selling raffle tickets for prizes 
including a 10-speed bicycle and 
television set. 

Bric-a-brac, furniture and 
other Items will be available at 
a white elephant booth, and 
toys will be sold from a separate 



toy booth. Each class at the 
school will have a game booth. 

AN ART BOOTH will have 
pictures and frames, and 
parents will prepare homemade 
goods for the baked goods 
booth. 

Art Daniels, a local artist, will 
draw charcoal portraits during 
the day. Appointments for 
portraits may be made by 
calling Blance Cox at 481-1345. 

Proceeds fronj this yrar's 
happening wilt be used to buy 
bleachers for the school 
gymnasium. 



EaUng is one of man'i basic 
instincts. He tells himssV he 
eats to ^y alive, but actually 
he's Uterally eating himself to 
de^h. !>■ 

Today's cost of food couU 
be a blessing in disguise — 
since the foods whbdi are hi0i 
in saturated fats and 
cholesterol ve often those 
iriiich are most ^ected by 
oirrent spiraling prices. 

When vras the last time you 
had a sirkiin steak or a rib 
roast? How fw can you 
stretdi a pound of ground 
beef? And how often during 
(he past mondis have you 
shopped for meat but ended 
up wA bi^ng because prices 
ve Just too hi^T*' 

Like 90 nuBiy of ui, you're 
probably eating less meat 
these days — or maybe even 
none at all until prices come 
down. Whatever your meat 
diet, those inflated price tags 
couU be the best thing diat 
ever happened to you, be- 
cause if you're eedng less 
meat, you're also eatliig less 
saturated tet. 

For years doctors and med- 
kal scientists have wged 
people to lower their intake of 
high-fat, high-cholesterol 
foods and to supplement dieir 
(ttets with fish, poultry, meat 
substitutes, and fresh vege- 
tables. Drinking low-fat or 
sUm milk, and limiting die 
number of ens you eat have 
also been stressed. Foods like 
butter, cream, cheese, 
whipped cream, sour cream 
and ice cream are also serious 
offenders. 

The following recipe con- 
tains skim milk, egg whites 
and low-fat cheese and is bal- 
ahced to give you the right 
combination (rf ambu adds. 
So rdaz and enjoy eating 



meat suoaututM occadonally 
— they an good for you* 
heart and your budget. 

FLUF FY P TOilDUE 
CA8BES0L£ 

(Note) 

Ibis deUcate dish puffs up 
Hhp a souffle. 
4 slices brea^ toa^ed 
Margarine 
Vk coBftt low4at cottage 

cheese 

4 laif e egg vrtiites 
m cups skim milk fortified 

with V4 cup nonfat dry 

milk 

V4 teaqioon dry mustard 
V4 teaspoon paprika 
V4 teaspoon Worcesterahire 

sauce 

Vi teaspoon salt 
V4 teaqioon black pepper 
1 heaping tablespoon 
' chopped ddves 
1 trit>lespoon sherry 

I¥eheat ovHito 350 degrees 
F. Grease an oblong biddng- 
dish (about 8 x 13 biches). 
Spread the toast with 
msrgarine uid cut into cubes. 



Place evenly over bottom <A 
Ae bddng dish. Beat egg 
whites in a laif e bowl unu 
stiff. In a btendo-, beat cot- 
tage dieeSeuntO creamy. Add 
Uie milk and aU other ii«redi- 
ente. Send dioroughly. 

Caretally iokl Ws mizbire 
into the stiffly beaten egg 
wMtes, and pour into die 
baking dish. Bake 45 mlmites 
to an hour or uidil a knife in- 
serted hi the center comes out 
clean. 

Yi^: Foir to six servii^. 

(Note) American 'Heart 
Assodadon Codcbook 1973. 



A little chidcen is enou^ 
when combined with vege- 
taUes and served with rice'Or 
noodles. ^ 

CHICKEN 
CHOPSUEY 

3 tablespoons polyun- 
saturated oil 

2 ct^M cooked diidten (ddn 
removed), sliced bi strips 



r 



South Pacific Salad 



6-S 01. rock lobator tails 

y* loaspoon poppor 

Iroah lomon juico 

mayonnalaa 

1 to 2 pimantoi. cut In atrlpa 

1 cup ripa ollvaa 



"\ 



Clip 'n' Cook 



^ 



1 10 ox. packal trozon paaa and carrota 
Vi cup bottlad capara, dralnad 
1 cucumbar. parad and sllcad 
3 modlum tomatooa, quartarad 
1 avocadoi paalad and allcad 
carrot curia 



2 cups shraddad lattuca 

In a largo aaucapan, to 3 quarts boiling walar, add 1 tablaspoon salt and lobstar tails, bring 
to boll, covor and almmor 10 minulas. Drain, covor witti coW wator, than drain again. Using 
kitchan ahaara, cut undaralda mambrana away from aach lobator tall, than gantly pull maat 
away from aach lobstar tall, kooping shalls. Sllca soma maat from aach lobstar tall, chop 
rost, than toss It with shraddad lattuca, 1 taaspoon salt, pappar, paaa and carrota, 2 to 3 
tablaspoona mayonnalaa and lamon |ulca. Now stuff aach sholl with soma of this mlituro, 
lay lobatar sllcas on top, spraad llglttly with mayonnalaa, rafrtgarala. Bafera aarving; ar- 
ranga lobatar tails on platlar, garnlah aach with soma capars, pimanio atrlpa. Surround with 
cucumbar, ollvaa, tomatoas, carrota, avocado (brushad with lamon |ulca). 



New galleries to ^ow 
French impressionists 



The Chrysler Museum. 
Norfolk, will open new French 
19th century galleries to the 
public Saturday. The group of 
newly remodeled galleries will 
link the already completed 17th 
and 18th c^tury galleries with 
the existing French 

Impressionist gallery. 

The new 19th century French 
galleries offer a diversity of 
French paintings from the 
beginning of modern painting. 
The galleries have been set up 
to reflect art at its most 
multiphasic stage, 
demonstrating the changes 
French and European society 
experienced" during that 



century. 

Included in Ihe galleries are 
"Le Boeuf Encor^" and 
"Scene From a ^mantic 
Novel" by Eugene Delacroix; 
"Seashore" by Charles 
Daubigny; "Landscape in 
Thunderstorm" by Jean 
Baptiste Camille Corot; 
"Woman Mending" by Jean 
Millet; and "Moonlight on the 
Loire" by Henri Joseph 
Harpignes. 

Further information about 
the opening of the galleries may 
be obtained by calling Dennis 
Anderson, the museum's 
curator of contemporary art, at 
622-1211, extension 44. 



Comedy continues 
on playhouse stage 



The Broadway comedy "6 Rms Riv Vu" Is continuing its 
run at the Cavalier Dinner Playhouse, 3517 Argonne Ave., 
Norfolk. 

The cast of six includes James AndrewskI, Daryl 
Salzberg, Carl Cole, Betty Ishee, Kathleen Lockwood and 
Edd Garroa The production is under the directiot (rf Jon 
Dawsom. 

"6 Rms Riv Vu" is performed nightly, except Monday, 
at the dinner playhouse. Doors open at 6 with a buffet 
dinner at 6:45 and curtain at 8: 15. Tickets for dinner and 
the play are $7.50 and $8.50. (Special discount rates are 
available for groups of 15 or larger. Reservatiwjs are 
necessary and may be made by calling 855-6033. 




Remember when 
frozen juice was 
a miracle food? 



IN THE REAL party spirit, chafing dish beef 
nnd rice and honey pears will add flair to any 
festive occasion. 

Beef and rice aiU 
flair to party dish 



m 



Alexander 
Beeyle 



^j 



207 Laskin Rd. or Pembroke Mall 



UsL 



Cnt'.^CtH 



the successful hostess is 
one who has die ken to bidude 
Qair in party foodi. Flair bi- 
dudes many diingi — food 
dramatics, eye aippal and 
ouUof-d)e<rdinary dishes and 
seasonugs. 

B includes servbig foods bi 
diafbig didies, Qandw foods 
nd new and different condii- 
natimis. Ihese towdies need 
not be unduly expensive, (nriy 
ezdtbigfy dUfferent 

Chtfta« Dbh Beef snd Rice, 
ItSg Prune ARMttavs and 
Slpbited Honey Pears wlD 
most certataiy come under 
ttiis category. Each wiU add 
flau- to any party. 

CaiAFIBWlDira 
B^AKn>RICE 

1 pomi beef bq> round, 
tMifysUced 

2 t^lespona dl 

1 clove gai^, dtoed 



1 lai^e onion, siked 
1 green pqiper, sliced 

1 tablespoon Worcester- 
ddresmice 

V4 cupiHiiAey 

2 cups bedbrodi 
Salt, pepper 

2 cups precodnd rice 
1 tomato, in wedges 

Ibe meat ^ouM be sUoed 
on Ow diagonidxH* agabist Uie 
,^ pain, prefmiluy iHiile it bi 
partially fronn. Heat die oQ 
hi die chafing dHsh ovac^dbwt 
heat. Oroiro meat l^Uy. Re- 
nMwe to a (bsh and keep 
warm. Add vegetables, cook 
iBitil onicn is transiiarent 
Add Uquids, Ih^ to a bdl, 
add rice. Cover £e pan and 
sinmM* until dte rice hi ten- 
der, aboid toi mtattM. Add 
tomato wedges and meat, re- 
heat fw 2 mtaiutes. Makes 4 to 
6servi^. 



BKAl I \ s\l <»Ns 



awmpoo t Sot ^rom $3.25 

Complala Parmonant Wovat $6.95 to $19.95 

RouK FonciTona Touch-up From $5 00 

Rou» Frosting (Shampoo t Sal Extro) $12.50 

Haircut $2.75 (Lonfl Hair $3.50) 

No Appointment Necessary - Just Come In 



HILLTOP 
DAILY- 8 *TIL 6:30 



MHtop Plaz« Snopirtnfl C«r»t»r 
LasMn Rd. Naxt to Safaway 
PAMM: 42S-9t97 



DAILY -9 'TIL 6 
THURS. • 9 TIL 9 



sua Va. Saach Wvd. 
AcroM from GEX 
PftOrta: 497-9769 
Va. Such 



17IME. 

LHl^CraM M. 
Naxt to Zayrw 
Phona! saa-9093 
Norfc^ 




By CATHY B.HINTON 

Virginia Department 

of Agriculture 

The food industry has come a 
long way in a relatively shwt 
amount dt time. 

Consider the 1930s, when 
there were no such things as 
skim milk, margarine w easy to 
pepare foods like frozen f rench 
fries. 

Flip the calendar back to 1930, 
then survey your modern-day 
refrigerator. You may be 
im[x-essed by what you don't 
see rather than what you see. 

To begin with, there's no 
frozen orange juice, and 
margarine has not yet caught 
on. Then, of course, there's no 
canned baby food, no frozen 
vegetables and no sherbet. 
Unless It's a Sunday, there^s 
probably no chicken. Badt then 
chicken was reserved for a 
Sunday treat 

THE ODDS a 50-50 chance 
you'll find pork. Prark accounted 
for half of per capita meat 
consumption in the 30s. There's 
a 90 per cent chance of having 
butter rather than margarine. 
There's also a 70 per cent 
chance of having fresh ot home- 
prepared fruits and vegetables 
rather than commercially 
processed ones. 

Frozen foods didn't appear on 
the market much before the 
1940s. Processed fruits and 
vegetables surpassed fresh 
sometime in die mid-l«Os. 

One of the most drastic 
changes in meat consumption 
over the years has been the 
increase in beef use. The 
average U.S. citizen has 
Incr^sed corsumption (rf meat 
and poultry, processed fruits 
and vegetables, margarine and 
salad and cooking dls. On the 
other hand, cai^mers have cut 
(k>wn on dairy and cereal 
products, coffee and potatoes. 

Changes In diet hatrits are due 
to many factors, but price is one 
of the greatest reasons why 
poultry has taken wing and 
poultry coraumption has more 
than dmibled in the past «> 
years. 

CONVENIENCE foods have 




■ 'ORIENTALARTS&CU 



CURIOS 



425-9335 



HOURa- 10 am. It) 5:00 p.m. 
CLOSED SUN. ft HON. 

716 FIRST COLONIAL 
HILLTOP WKST 

(BehimJ MctJiMiakl<i on Laskin Kd.) 



f 



1 brge onion cut in 2-bich 
s^^ 

2 pieces ceksy cut bi 24nch 
strips 

t green onioia cut bi 2-bich 
strips 

1 medium green pefver cut 
UI 2-in(di sbips 

^ pound fresh mushrooms 
or 1 can (4 os.) sliced 

IVi to 2 cqs bean sprouts or 
1 can (1 lb.) 

2 taUespoons conistardi 
I tabiaqMmi soy sauce 
Salt and pepper to taste 

Heat oU in a large ddUet 
Add chicken and stb* undl 
lightty browned. Add all of die 
vegetables («|cq>t the bean 
sprouts) and % cup water or 
bouiUon. Cook covered five 
minutes. Make a smooth 
paste of die ciMnstwch, soy 
sauce and Vt cup water or 
bouillon. Add ddsndzbire and t> 
the bean sprouts to the 
chidcen-vegetable mbcbire. 
Cook dree mbiutes or undl 
sauce is thickened. Serve over 
boded rice or noodles. Makes 
four servtaigs. 



» 



found their niche in our busy, 
on-the-go schedules today. 
Frozen, canned and freeze- 
drled foods offer excellent 
choices for peqsle who want to 
spend less time in the kitchen. 
Potato items now appear as 
frozen french fries, instant, 
hashbrown, au gratin— all with 
time-saving directions. . 

Other factor contributing to 
dietary change are weight 
consciousness, lighter 
breakfasts, rising incomes and 
other changes in living and 
working conditions. 

Now, In 1974, open the 
refrigerator and compere all 
the items in it to the foods of 
\Wd. The contrast may amaze 
you. 

< i »*A»A 

If you feel especially glpm 
over the price of your maritet 
basket, consider this 
comparison: A basket of 
groceries costing $%.27 in New 
Ycrk is priced at $213.56 in 
Tdiyo. Feel better now? 

Food iMices are steadier than 
usual now. Most beef cuts 
remained level to a few cents 
less per pound tar most cuts. 
Ground beef showed the largest 
decline in price. 

PORK PRICES are still 
moving downward with some 
excellent choices In area stores. 
Poultry prices declined a few 
(%nts per pound with no drastic 
price changes noted. 

Eggs have come down in 
price. A dozen Grade A large 
eggs are priced armmd ^ to 83 
cents. 

Gc^n beans are coming down 
in p^cs accomfanied by that 
spring favorite, asparagus. 
Green onions and cucumbers 
are also lower in price. Bagged 
potatoes are still sh<»ving price 
increases of four to el^t cents 
per bag. 

Fruits are showing signs of 
seasonal changes with 
honeydew melons going down in 
irice and winesap apples up. 
There is an up and down 
movement each week for 
strawberries, cantaloupe and 
pineapple. 



\l 



-*^. 



Reli gion 



IVMSun-WwlneKtay, April 17, 1974-PagB B-5 



Male supremacy: A dam 's rib or Eve 's 



i 



NEW YORK— Is God a male «• female fipjre? 

Why did the authors of Scripture reverse the 
maleand female roles of creation in making Eve 
from Adam's rib? 

How can Ari^tlfe's ancient Greek theories 
about women affect religious life today? 

These are some of the questions bejng 
considered as women's libera tionists forge ahead 
in their battle for full equality in the church. 

INDRRD. THOUGH Women's Lib is gaining a 
toeFiold in organized religion, the controversy 
over the status of women in the church has yet to 
reach its peak, in the opinion of spokespersons 



for equality movement. 

WWle some women chip away at prejudices, 
gaining ordination, being honwed with election 
to high posts and winning other recognitimi, 
others are posing questions that are shaking the 
"fathers" of the organized church. 

Among those active in the cause of Women's 
Lib in the church is Nancy Van vuuren, 
president of Pennsylvanians for Women's Rights 
and an industrial consultant who specializes in 
equal c^portunity in training and employment. 

MS. VAN VUUREN has written at length on 
the subject in "The Subversion of Women as 



Practiced by Churches, Witch^tainters, and 
Other Sexists." Her opim<Mi6 are being 
distributed by the Westminster Press, the 
publishing arm of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the U.S.A. 

In tracing the history (tf the "subv«vliMi of 
women," Ms Van Vuuroi maintains that the 
judeoChristian tradition was responsible for 
establishing men as the wielders of religious 
power. 

Tlien, she said, as the Roman Cathdtc church 
became the predominant political Institution, it 
as able to force its ideas about women on other 
institutions. 



"The Roman Catholic church," she added, 
"and later the Protestant church imposed its 
convictions of male supremacy and superiority 
on the entire Western world, and subverted 
wmnen into the roles that men most f^red, and 
so perhaps desired: sex and magic-witchcraft." 

DESPITE THE FACT that women have been 
admitted into the highest decision-making bodies 
<rf many Protestant groups, they still are not 
considered equal to men generally within the 
church, she maintains. 

"The traditional concepts of the role of women 
in the churches do not meet the needs of pe(^le," 



she explains. "Some women have broken out of 
this role, but frequently at the expense of severe 
guilt, for their whole training, even in the public 
schools, teaches them that they arenonpersons if 
th^ are not married and do not have children, 

"The women who remain in the churches, nof 
retelling against the role and position into which 
they have been placed, sometimes become 
vicious toward other women, condertining them 
fw not suffering by having mwe children, for not 
being 'subject' to their husbands. These women 
often support wars even though it is their owp 
sons who will be maimed or killed. 



The Last Supper 




\ Leonardo da VIncI mifsterpiece. "TTie Last 
Supper." came to life last week at the Thalia 
United Methodist Church. As a part (tf Easter 
Remembrance, the Seekers Sunday School 



Class portrayed Jesus and his disciples In the 
living dramatization written by Ernest K. 
Rmurlan. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 




CHURCH 
NOTES 



A 5a»RING cotKert will be 
presented by the Old Dominion 
■tftiiversity Concert Choir 
McHiday ata:15 p.m. atBaylake 
United Methodist Church, 4300 
Shcre Drive. The program of 
contemporary and traditicmal 
music is open to the public free 
of charge. 

"RENEW God's People" is 
the theme of the regional 
Baptist Bally April 30 in 
Portsmouth. Baptist Men of 
Virginia will meet at the 
Western Branch Baptist Church 
at 7:30 p.m. for the rally, one of 
10 in the state. John Moeller, 
member of Thalia Lynn Baptist 
Church of Virginia Beach, and 
the Rev. James Ballard of Main 
Street Baptist Church, 
Hendersonville, N.C., will 
present the program. 

ATLANTIC BAPTIST Bible 
College win observe College 
Day Friday at 10 a.m. at the 
college, 3000 Berkley Ave., 
Chesapeake. Luncheon and 
sports events will be included in 
the day's activities. Prcspective 
students are invited to attend. 

MEN OF Galilee Episc(^l 
Church meet each Wednesday 
at 7 a.m. for a businessman's 
breakfast at the Cavalier 
Oceanfront. The meeting 
inclwi^ a short Bible lesson 



fdlowed by a question and 
answer comment session on the 
lesson. More information about 
Uie breakfast meetings may be 
obtained by calling the church 
at 428-3573. 

THE MUSICAL "Joy" will be 
presented by tjie Ywth Choir of 



the North Trenholm Baptist 
Church, Columbia, S.C, Friday 
at 7:30 p.m. at Bayside Baptist 
Church. 1920 Pleasure House 
Road. The Bayside High School 
Concert Chorus and Madrigal 
Singers will present their 
annual sabred concert at the 
church Sunday at 7 p.m. 



Need help? Phone-in TV 

700 CLUB 

featuring 

Pat Robertson 

8 PM weeknight 



V-^ 


H^ 




.L 



CEDAR WOOD 
HAMPTON'S 
PINEWOOD GARDENS 
GATEWOOD PARK 
GREAT NECK VILLAGE 
REGENCY APTS. 
BELLAMY MANOR 
W00DHUR8T 
COUNTY VIEW 
/ TRAILER PARK 



NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
AND GIRLS 

MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
If you would like to tarntxtri 
money and live in any of the 
areas listed below, call 
486-3430, Monday thru Friday 



THESE ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARE NEEDED 

72nd ST. AREA 

(OCEAN FRONT) 
CARDINAL ESTATES 
' 69th STREET AREA 
WASHINGTON SQUARE 
ARROWHEAD 
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CAROLANNE FARMS 
AVALON HILLS 
CHANTICLEAR APTS. 
LAKE EDWARD 
GREAT NECK MANOR 



C9II today and start earning that extra monayrlght nowl 
486-3430 circulation 



Religion Page Sponsors 







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• • 



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TiKMHtFlMWtaM ■«•«•(«'' 



^ifflSte 



If you have just roovrai. 
It's time to aili your 
Wela}n» Wagon host^s. 

Phone 340-2131 

If yow art lnt«r«t«d In getting 
InfoTRMtlon about Ming a 
WMcom* Wagon H<»t«(t, fill 
out tha followtftg coupon 



Namai 



Mont No. I .,„_..«. — — - 

Mill to: WMcom* Wagon 
S70S Klngt' Pt. C^rta 
Va^a^., Va.23«S2 



A THOUGHT 

FOR 

TODAY 

APRIL 17, 1974 

AThmightforToday 
April 17. 1974 

By:Rev.Har<rtd 

Hiilini 

Emmanuel 

Tabernacle Ciwrch 

Psalm: 100:4, § 
"Enter into Ids gates with 
thaidcsgiving, and into his 
courts with praise: be 
tiiankful unto him, and 
Mess his name. For the 
Lord is good; his mercy is 
ev«4asting; and his truth 
endureth to all 
generations." 



BAYUKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Shoic Drive 
Va.leai* - 464-2423 

Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

aHui*SciKMl9:30AJI. 
Moori^Wa^ip 11:MJUL 
^STORS ASS WqCCME. 



EMMANUEL TABERNACLE 
OIURCH-UPC 
157 MoniMMi Ave. 
(1 block off S. Lynnhtvim Rd.) 
Rev. Harold HuliMi-Putot 
PhoM: 340-7333 
SvBdqrSchool - 10:00 kM. 
FtowUng-7:30PJii. 
#ediie«iqr7:30PJi. 

i^UeStaify 
lEvcfyoiM Welcome, Come 
Wotriilp WMi Ui" 



KEMPSVILLE 
BAPTIST CHURCH 
5204 MneeM Aane Rowi 
Rev. GmOtet H. Jonn 

PMtot 
andw Scdiool - 9:45 AJi. 
Wonkl^- 11:00 AJL 
T(aiiiiiigUtioa-6:15PJif. 
Evimfa^ Wonhv - 7:30 PJI. 
Weiiimdqy Ev^m -V.lStM. 
Prqrei Meetti« md Bfl>le SMdy 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 

CHURCH OF THE 

. NAZARENE 

B«T. Itevid Holiteta, Pkitor 

SSM Pitfimsat Ph. 4974703 
SmAag SfkoA Hi. - 9:45 A.M. 
Iftw of nfemiph 10:50 kM. 
YoHft, A AMt 
Mp - «:00 P.U. 
<tflM|4^kM- 7:00 P.M. 

m. 

t%Wt 7:30 P.M. 



ROCK CHURCH 

640KempfvilleRd. Ph. 499-3727 

ViiginiaBeKh 

Stmday 

Sunday ScIhmI t:4S A.M. 

MornMg WonMp n:M A.M. 

Evtnlng WariMp 7:N P.M. 

TiMMlav 

Marning WortWp t»:J« A.M. 

Evtnilig Wortfllp 7:1» PM. 

Tkiiridav 

I^HiMg Warthig 1«:N A.M. 

^^ing WorthI* ;:M P.M. 

NM-MnrAvai&Wt 
PASTORS 



lUv.JslwOlniaMi «a»;ABaOlmai«ai 



f3 



fST 



AsNinUyofGod 

(Cof]MfVa.BeMdiBhrd. 
OoauaBbd.) 

S.MH,VMta( 

} 428-5297 



ASPHALT 

ROADS 

& 

MATERIALS 

Phone - 497-3591 



PRINCESS ANNE 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 

504 S. Military Hwy. 

Virginia Baach, Va. 
Phona420- 1S40 

John Deorq^ itiolpmmnf 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonney Road 
Phone • 340-1161 



PEOPLE 
BANK 

OF VIRGINIA BEACH 



ACH .^^ 



Offices Throughout Virginia Beach 

425-5077*^ 
First In Free Checking 
First In Saturday Banking 



\: 



.5 



FIRSTCHURCH 

OF CHRIST 

SCICNTIST 

Vifflilila Btach 

1341 Laskin Rd. 

Sunday 

Chiircli Service ii:89 AM 

SuMiaV SclW.! tl:Oe AM 

WtdMMiay 

Testlmany Mactlnff •:M 
FM 

Chrtotlan Scl^tist 

RtadiR* Room 

Csan* iMrastasahove)) 

Mentfay thru SatMrday ' 

IliMinWStMFM 

Alto OpM Tve^ay Bvenint 

7:MFMfef:MFM 

Ewryen* it weicwne to 
Stvdy, •irrow, or §«y 
Anthorltod Chriilian 
SciMtItt LHtratvrt and Hio 
KMf Jamtt VertiM el Me 
■ibio. 

Chflttlan StiMtttt MMltar 
it alto avan^M. 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

4750 Baxter Rd.-Va. Beaeli 
tutot: W. P. Ckaadataff 
Ftone: 497420S 

teadar SdKMl: 9:45 A.M. 

(AlAfN) 
Pnadih«Saviee: 11:00 AJi, 
EvMi^g Pieacttv 7:00 PJL 
Wedawdw7i30PJi. 

Varied Voalh ActMttM 



7HERB IS A 
DIFFFRENCB 

TRY 

Beach Font 



WELCOME TO WORKUP 

ANDwirmsswin 

ST. MARK A.M.E. 

CNURCH 

J.AltwiBatta,MinW« 
17M toUm Rd. Vbglnta 
Be«di,Va. 

Study n>me 428-13% 
Oiech School • 9:96 AM. 
UvtovWm^^)- 11:00 Al 
WadBM^ • 7:00 PJi. 
Tht TiwfMM Wntatfy 



TIDEWATER 
STEEL INC. 

5827 Curlmw Dr. 
Norfolk, Va. 



SEA SIDE 
PRESS 

5051 Holland Drive 

Va. Beach 
Phone - 497-8126 



DAIRIES, INC 

$103 PKINCItS ANNI ROAD 
VlllGINIA liACH, VA. 23462 



mONE497-3S18 



^^wr^ 



.T fTW 



I ^..JK jj 



■^^■■^WBi 



"TT- 



P»ge B-6-The Sun -Wednesday, AprU 17, 1974 







Life's 



moments 



9ff t$i U/Uf^ 



"This just made my whole week. One day they 
told me I was pregnant. The next day I was 
assigned to a ship." 

This summed up the reaction of Petty Officer 
Diane K. Taylor, 25, when she, received orders to 
report this month for duty on board the USS Nash- 
ville. She was the only woman to be assigned to the 
ship. 

Ms. Taylor, who performs journalistic duties in 
the Public Affairs Office at Naval Air Station 
(NAS) Oceana, said the report of her being 
pregnant followed medical tests for an unusual 
weight condition. Additional tests confirmed she 
wasj not pregnant. Actually, her rapid weight gain 
was <lue to a thyroid condition. 



I)IKIN(; THE 

lengthy process to 
'cancel her sea duty 
orders. Ms. Taylor 
learned she had been 
the victim of today's 
computer age. It ap- 
pears that prior to her 
receiving her rating, 
her name was fed into a 
computer used in 
determining personnel 
available for sea duty. 
Her name still cleared 
all screening processes, 
apparently because no 
one had been assigned 
to screen individuals in 
her rating. 




MS. TAYLOR 



Although she describes her initial reaction to both 
situations as "a complete shock," she is now able to 
laugh over the experience. She said, "I had all 
kinds of trouble getting those orders canceled. They 
just didn't believe I was a girl being assigned to a 
ship." 

Remembering the day she received her 
assignment to sea duty she said, "I lo(*ed at the 
orders and asked myself if they were for real. I took 
them to the legal officer and he said, 'They're for 
real'. I then went to the executive officer to ask 
about them and he laughed. I said I wasn't going 
b^tause I was a girl, and there were no girls on the 
ship. I told him I was quitting and he said he wasn't 
accepting any resignations that day." „ 



MS. TAYLOR said slie then decided to take her 
case to those in command of the USS Nashville, 
which was in port preparing for deployment. Her 
pleas fell oh unsympathetic ears. "I called the ship 
and talked to the officer of the day. He said. 'Well, 
honey, we don't have any private rooms, but if you 
want to come over you just go ahead.' They were 
nice and just laughed about it." 



Now that these problems are behind her and she 
has resumed her normal daily routine, Ms. Taylor 
reflects how her life might have been had she ac- 
tually gone to sea. She thinks she "would enjoy 
going to sea. 1 think it would be an interesting ex- 
perience." She added, "1 would like to be assigned 
to an aircraft carrier or a submarine going to the 
Mediterranean so I could visit all the places I've 
always wanted to see." 

When asked if she felt she could cope with the 
days and weeks of confinement in close quarters 
aboard a ship, especially a submarine, she jdiingly 
replied, "If I can live through being the second 
enlisted woman to be assigned to this base, I think 
I could stand sea duty." 



/ 




Night lights for tennis 
cheapr says Paries Dept 



m. 



LKALS 



FASHION CAREER 

Like To Own A Dress Shop? 
Ail Name Brand Ladies Wear 

FACTORY FRESH LATEST STYLE 

YOUR CUSTOMERS 
SAVE UP TO 50% 

COMPLETE INVENTORY ^ 

BEAUTIFUL REDWOOD FIXTURES 
COMPLETE TRAINING PROGRAM 

VISIT OUR STORES 

TALK TO OUR OWNERS 
Very High Earnings 

INVESTMENT - $12,500. 

OTH€R CHOICE AREAS AVAILABLE 
CALL COLLECT MR. TODD 904-396-1707 
Or Write: 

HY-STYLE SHOPPE 
p. 0. Box 26009 
I .tocktMmlte, Florida 32218 




The city's Parks and 
Recreation Department 'is 
ready to answer those seasonal 
floods of public complaints 
about wasting electricity now 
that the lights are on at the 
city's 52 night-lighted tennis 
courts. 

Automatic time clocks at the 
52 courts turn the lights on at 7 
p.m. and off at 11 p.m., James, 
"Ken" Cole, recreation 
supervisor, told Parks and 
Recreation Commission 
members at last week's 
commission meeting. 

It is cheaper to leave the 
li^ts- burning for four hours 
each night, even if no one is 
using the courts, than to hire a 
person to turn them on and off, 
Mr. Cole explained. 

Statistics compiled by his 



department show that it coste 61 
cents per night to light six 
tennis courts ( most courts in the 
city are in groups of six). That 
figures out to about $140 per 
year for six courts, he said. 

THERE ARE NINE lighted 
tennis sites in the city. It costs 
approximately $1,260 po* year 
to light the courts using the 
automatic clocks. 

The dq;>artmait eliminated 
lighting at tennis courts during 
the winter in view of the energy 
crisis. The lights were 
previously on anywhere from 
nine months to all year, 
depending on weather 
conditions, said Ned Cheely, 
city athletics supervisor. 

The total lighting bill toe all 
athletics facilities in the city, 



Skill contest set 



Burning the fl^ for firefighters 



Firth and sixth graders at Princess Anne High 
School rallied around the flag pole last week 
for an official flag burning ceremony 
nerformed hv Girl Scout Troop 343. The scouts 
demonstrated the proper method of disposing 
of an old flag and raising the new colors. (Sun 
photo hv Rod Mann) 



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Solution to puzzle on page A-4 



Area volunteer fire 
departments will be putting 
their first-aid and firefighting 
skills to the test Saturday when 
they participate in a series of 
contests sponsored by the Davis 
Corner Volunteer Fire 
Department and Rescue Squad. 

Bayside Junior High School 
will be the setting for all 
contests. Beginning at noon, 
members of the Tidewater 
Firemen's Association will 
compete in fire fighting contests 
requiring them to connect 
hoses, raise ladders, dress in 
complete fire-fighting gear and 
respond to a fire call. 

Rescue squadsmen will 
compete in first-aid contests 
using rescue units to aid 
"victims." 



TIDEWATER Firemen's 
Association jijdges will 
determine winners on the basis 
of time elapsed and penalty 
points accumulated. 

Contest winners will be 
awarded trophies and ribbons 
during a dance at the Civic 
Center after the day's 
activities. The dance is open to 
the public. Tickets are availably 
from the Davis Corner 
Volunteer Fire Department, 316 
Davis St. The Shades of Blue 
will provide dance music. 

Proceeds from the dance will 
be used to equip the fire 
department's new life sun>ort 
vehicle. 



including 10 hard-surfaced 
multipie-us« areas, S2 tennis 
courts and 18 combination 
ballfields, is approximately 
$16,000 per year, Mr. Cole said. 

"We know we're still going to 
get complaints," he said, "but 
what we are trying to get across 
to the public is that it really 
costs very little to leave these 
lights burning." 



Juveniles 
charged in 
burglary 



Three juvenile boys, ages 14 
and IS, according to ptdice, 
have been charged with 
burglarizing a Princess Anne 
Plaza home and removing an 
estimated $900 worth of 
personal belongings and 
household items. 

Investigators said the in- 
cident occurred during the first 
week of A'pril while the 
residents were absent. An 
estimatefd $2,000 damage was 
done to the home's interior at 
the same time. 

Entry to the home was 
reportedly gained by forcing 
open the rear door. Officials 
said lamps were broken, 
furniture marred, and broken 
glass, dirt and debris was 
strewn throughout the h(Hne. 

The accused juveniles were 
released to the custody of their 
parents to await iroceedings in 
Juvenile Court. 




Sf-'T-TJ^ 




seconds 
enouj^. 



At a time wtien people are demanding more 
informative advertising, television commercials are 
getting stiortar 

Ttie trend Is to 30 second spots Or time tor 
about SO vyords 

That's not enough lo tell everything consumers 
want to know these days: prices, colors, guarantees, 
where to find H. what it's made of. and so much 
more. 

Instead, advertise where you can tell a complete 



story without Iwing a "fast talker." 

In newspapers. 

In newspapers you can give the full detail»-in 
30 seconds the average reader can absorb 250 
words, or 5 times as much infonnation as from TV. 

And newspapers let a consumer pause to 
evakjate. re-read, and even clip your ad as a reminder. 

Newspapers have always been the hardest 
working advertising medium. 
And we think their future looks better than ever. 



We^ve saved 
you a place 

, in The Sun 

and here's how 



to get It! 




Wedding and engagement announce- 
ments may be submitted to The Sun by 
mailing announcements to "Brides." 
Announcements should be typed. If pos- 
sible, or prin^ legibly. The deadline for 
receiving annoum^ments is noon Friday 
prior to the week of publication. Pictures 
will be returned if accompanied by a 
stamped, self-«idre»ed envelope. 



■i«*^ 




-<dy 



'"Ktsii/un 



48&3i30 



Forum 



<r^ 



*% 



Readen are encouraged to have their 
say in letteni to the editor. Names will 
be withheld on rec^est, but please in- 
clude your name and telephone number 
with your latter. Of course, the letters 
are subject only to minor editing to meet 
newspaper style and space requirements. 
To express your opinion or just to make 
a comment, write Forum in cam of The 
Sun. 



SUA DML 



Mall ^notices of club meeting and iK- 
nouncements of upcoming evMits to 
"Sim tMrt." Announcements should be 
typed if pmsible, or printed legibly, and 
should include a daytime telephone num- 
ber if additional information is meded. 
Notices for "Sun Did" must be recMved 
by noon Friday prior to the week of 
puMication. 



^^Knii/un 



The Sun 

1% Rosemont Road 

Virginia B«K:h, Va. 23452 



» 



NOTICE OF 
mi M.IC HEARING 



The Virginia Beach Board 
o» Zoning Appeals wHI 
conduct a Public Hearing 
on Wednesday, May 1, 1974, 
at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Municipal Court Building, 
upstairs court room. City 
Hall, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The following 
applications will appear on 
the agenda. 

1. Sarah L. Wilson by 
Thoma* C. ' Broyles 
requesH a variance to allow 
parking In the reeiuired 
setback from Attantic 
Avenue an4i,the dedicated 
20 foot lane adjoining the 
north side of the property 
and to waive the required 
landscaping in this area on 
a Parcel (northwest 
corner), Virginia Beach, 
200 36th Street. Virginia 
Beach Borough. 

2. V-Klel construction 
corporation by Wallace B. 
Smith requests a variance 
of 13 feet to a 17 foot setback 
fronr> an unnamed street 
instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 9, Block O, 
Section 8, Part l, Fairfield, 
5301 Balfor Drive. 
Kempsville Borough. 

3. K & B Construction Co. 
requests a variance of 10^ 
feet to a 40 foot setback 
from Bay Breeze Court 
instead of 50 feet as 
required of Lot 18, Section 

4. Baycliff, Bay Breeze 
Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 
4. K 8i B construction Co. 
requests a variance of 10 
feet to a 40 foot setback 
from' Seafarer Cove 
(street) instead of 50 feet as 
required of Lot 16, Section 

4. Baycliff, Seafarer Cove. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

5. Lake Conrad 
corporation requests a 
variance of 10 feet to a 20 
foot setback from Roberts 
Point (sh-eet) instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot 92, 
Block H, Section 3, Laurel 
cove, 1324 Roberts Point. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

6. Lake Conrad 
Corporation .requests a 
variance of 10 feet to a 20 
foot setback from Roberts 
Point (street) instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot 98, 
Block H, Section 3, Laurel 
Cove, 1309 Roberts Point. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

7. Lake conraa 
Corporation requests a 
variance of 20 feet to a 30 
foot front yard setback 
instead of 50 feet as 
required of Lot 60, Block H, 
Section 3, Laurel Cove, 1341 
Whisper Drive. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

8. Lake Conrad 
Corporation requests a 
variance of 17 feet to a 33 
foot front yard setback 
instead of SO feet as 
required of Lot 36, Block K, 
Section 3, Laurel Cove, 1286 
South Schooner Lane. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

9 . L a k e C o nr a d 
Corporation requests a 
variance of 30 feet to a 20 ^ 
foot front . yard setback ' 
instead of SO feet as 
required of Lot 57, Block H, 
Section 3, Laurel Cove, 1348 
Whisper Drive. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

10. Lois and Richard 
Kessman requests a' 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot 
fence instead of a 4 foot 
fence as allowed on Lot 16, 
Block B, Fox Run, 801 
Edwin Drive. Kenripsville 
Borough. 

11. Gary E. Ellsworth 
requests a variance of 10 
feet to a 20 foot setback 
from Edinburgh Drive 
instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 349, Section 
2, Malibu, 500 Big Pine 
Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

12. Ben Schulwolf requests 
a variance of 5 feet to a 25 
foot setback from Albright 
Drive instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 205, Section 
1, Brigadoon, Albright 
Drive. Kempivilte 
Borough. 

13. Ben Schulwolf requests 
a variance of 5 feet to a 25 
foot setback from Albright 
Drive instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 204, Section 
1, Brigadoon, Albright 
Drive. Kempsville 
Borough. 

14. Aleck F. and Soon J a 
MacDonald request a 
variance of 16.5 feet to a 
13.5 foot setback front- 
Hoyiake Drive instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot S3, 
Section 5, Larkspur, 521 
Edwin Drive. Kempsville 
Borough. 

15. The Colony by Philip D. 
Hightower requests a 
variance of 5 parking space 
to 54 parking spaces instead 
of 59 parking spaces a%, 
required of a PAnE^I 
(northeast corner of 13th 
Street and Atlantic 
Avenue), 13th Street and 
Atlantic Avenue. Virginia 
Beach Borough. 

16. Hudglns & Associates 
by Littleton Hudglns 
requests a variance of 35 

"feet to a "O" setback from 
tt|«, Virginia Beach-Norfolk 
Eitpressway instead of 35 
feqt as required of a Parcel 
(runi}ing 1436 feet east from 
First Colonial Road on the 
north side of Old Virginia 
Beach Road), Part «f ttte 
Property of Roxanne and 
George Parker, Old 
VIrgtnIa Beach Road. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

17. Frank Etiward Wrtl«r 
by RouseSirine Associates, 
Ltd. requests a variance of 
16 feet to a 14 foot setback 
from Bayberry Street 
instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 130, Plat No. 
1, Caftt Story by the Sea, 
Polneiana Drive and 
Bayberry Street. 
Lymhaven Borough. 

18. Charles W. and Helen 
G. CMp request a variance 
of 4 feet to a 6 foot side yard 
setback (eastern property , 
line) and a 6 foot rear yard 
setback (detached garage) 
Instead of 10 feet each as 
required of Lot 10, Block 7, 
Pocahontas Village, 4816 
Mandan Road. Kempsville 
Boroi^. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 



W.L. Tdwert 
Secretary 



4-17, 24, 2t 



--*-*-***-' 



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r ucas ], 

V '" : I F ' ■ ■ — - — J 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 

the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach« on the 

9th day of April, 1974. 

Marlorle Jane Hollmann 

Fletcher; Plaintiff, 

agatnst 
1 Tully Mack Fletcher, Jr., 
I Defendant 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theotajectof thissuitis to 
obtain a diwrca A vinculo 
Matrimonii ^ffom the said 
defendmnt, upon the 
grounds of separation 
onintcfrupted for more 
than twtt years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and »U«d that 
the dMendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
30St office address being: 
418 North Dower Court, 
Durham^ North Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do 
sppearhere virittiin ten (IQ) 
Jays'aft^r due publication 
lereof , arid do what may be 
lecessary fa protect Ms 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove 

D.CIerk 

Sfnith, Power & Owen 
1412 Mai-itrme Tower 
Norfolk, VA 

4.ir,24,i-l,8-4t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the circuit Court of the dfy 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
9th day of April, 1974. 
Jacqueline A. Groyne, 
Plaintiff; a0ajnsf 
Charles R. Greene, III, 
Defendant 

ORDEItOP 
. (>UBI.ICAtlON 

Theobiect of this suit rs to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of willful desertion 
and abandonment. 

And an affidavit having 
been nrtade and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
506' North Pine Street, 
deatord, Delaware. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after, due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk 

Willcox, Savage, Lawrence, 

als 

Virginia National Bank 

BIdg. 

Norfolk, VA 

V. 4.»?,24,5-l,5-8-4t 



. Commonwealth of Virginia, 
* In the Clerk's Office of 

the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach, on the 

9th day of April, 1974. 

Theodore R. Stohr, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Linda Ann Stohr, 

Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobiect Of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro /from the said 
defendant to be later 
merged Into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due dlMgence has been used 
by or in behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain in 
whichi county or 

corporation the defendant 
is without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 3033 Ashlawn 
Terrace, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten OO) 
days after due publication 
hereof ) and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentresa, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove, 
Deputy Clerk 

Clark, Steinhilber k 
Hofhelmer , 

287 Pembroke Office Park 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

4- 17,24,5 1.8-4t 



PUBLICNOTICE 

Notice Is hereby gi*en 
that ROteert L. Garrett, 124 
Pinewdod Road, Virginia 
Beach Virginia 234St has 
applied for a Certificate of 
Compliance from the State 
Water Control Board 
purisuant to Section 401 of 
the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act Amendments of 
1972, Pvblic Law 92 500 to 
Repair and Replacement of 
Bulkhead at Home Site - 124 
P!newb<« f?oad, Virginia 
Beach, va. 

The decision whether to 

fe issue file Certificate of 

Compliance will- be teased 

on an evali/ation of the 

rtfact of 0ie proposed 

■*act»vify oh State waters. 

written comments or 
induirles relative to this 
notice Should be addr«sed 
to the State water Control 
Board, P.O. BOX im3, 
Rfchmond, Virginia 23230 
and should reach the Board 
not later than 15 days after 
ttitt publication. ^^ 



NOTICE 

Thitia to notify the public 
that t*e undersigned, 
4, trading as Maryland Inn 
will within ten days after 
publication of this notice 
apply to the Virginia State 
Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Board for a license to set) 
mlKOd beverages tor on^sH 
premises consumption. 

K. George Mamoudis, 
Owner 

Maryland Inn 
T^a & Ocean Fra*»l 
Virginia Baach, va. 23451 



BetW J. Laseter 
wi'^MESS 



4 17 It 



CommonweAlfh Of Virginia, 
In ttie Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virqinia Beach, on the 
ISth^ay of April, 1974. 
RonaW wmiih'ed Martin, 
Plaintiff, 
against 
Anna K. Martin, Defendant. 

IdRDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobiect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged 
into a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: c- 
o Charles Anderson Route 
1, Belvidere, Tennessee 
37306, , , 

It a oVdered ttiat she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
niEceKary to protect her 
interest In ttils suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Osie H. Gay, Jr. 
2871 River Road 
Virginia 'Beach, Virginia 
4-17,24,51,8-41 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY* OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH ON THE 12th DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 
ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH 

sole Surviving Executrix of 
the Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 

MARY I.- CHILDRESS 
Address Unknown 
and the heirs of law, next of 
kin , devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien creditors 
of any heirs or devisees of 
Mary L. Childress, all of 
Whose names are unknown 
and whose post office 
addresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding of the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

INCHANCERY 
No.. C. 74-474 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobiectof thissuit isto 
quiet title to property which 
is more particularly 
described as follows: that 
certain lot, piece or parcel 
of land situated In the City 
of Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lot 2, Block 40 as shown on 
that cortain plat of Euclid 
Place which is .duly of 
record In the Clerk's Office 
of tfte Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, in Map Book 4 at 
pages 62 and 63. 

And ah affidavit having 
been made and filed that on 
information and belief 
Mary L. Childress Is not 
living. 

And an aHidavit having 
been filed stating that there 
are or may be other persons 
interested in the subiect 
matter to be disposed of in 
this suit whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to-wit: The heirs 
at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien creditors 
of any heirs or devisees of 
Mary L. Childress, all of 
whose names are unknown 
and whose post office 
addresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description ot 
Parties Unknown; it is 
ORDERED that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what Is 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and It is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published 
once a week for four (4) 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, and 
having circulation in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By Sandra Hargrove 

Peter A. Agelasto, III 
1300 United Virginia Bank 
BIdg. 

Norfolk, VA 
4-17,24,5-1,8-4t 

Commonwealth Of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
12th day of April, 1974. 
Glenn Dwight 
Blankenbaker, Plaintiff, 
against *» 

Jewell Haddock 
Blankenbaker, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobiectof thissuit is to 
obtain a divorce A^Vjpculo 
Matrimonii from fh'e said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion on February 23, 
1973, 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
2313 Yaocy Street, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 

It Is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk 

Decker, Zoby, Collias, al 
9(» Ptai* On* 
Norfolk, VA 

■ 4-17,24,5 l,8-4t 

OADEROF 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH 
OF VIRSINIA 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE JUVENILE AND 
DOMESTIC RELATIONS 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA 8EACH, ON 
THE tth DAY OF April,, 
1974. 



In re Baby Girl He#aA 

The obiect of this 
isroceeding is to separate 
the above named infvtt> 
child of Ramone Castre 
Jimenei IV and Mary Jean 
Hogan, permanently from 
ist parents and to commit 
„said infant to the care and 
custody of the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
Social Services with the 
right of said agency to 
consent to the infant's 
adoption. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Ramone Castro Jimenez IV 
Is a proper party to this 
proceeding; but du% 
diligence has been used to 
ascertain in what county or 
corporation he is, without 
effect, it is ORDERED that 
Ramone Castro Jimenez IV 
do appear here within ten 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 
A COPY TESTE: Gerald F, 
Williams, Clerk, 

Nancy Farley, 

Department of Social 

Services 

(Petitioner) 

Elizabeth E. Henley Clerk 

4 17, 24, 5-1,8, 4t 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall,-^ 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, April 29, 1974, 
at 2:00 P.M. at which time 
the following applications 
will be heard: 

DEFERRED BY CITY 
COUNCIL FOR A PERIOD 
OF 60 DAYS ON 
FEBRUARY 25, 1974: 

Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 

PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

1. Petition Of Mrs. E.S. 
Garcia for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-l 
Residential District to R-6 
Residential District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point on the South side 
of Colony Acres 1490 feet 
Southwest of the 
intersection of Colony Drive 
and London Bridge Road, 
running a distance of 1841 
feet more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 1830 
feet more or less along the 
Southern property line, 
running a distance of 1450 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line and 
running a distance of 1570 
feet more or less along the 
Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains ,69.5 
acres and excludes a parcel 
of land beginning at a point 
2250 feet Southwest of the 
intersection of London 
Bridge Road and Colony 
Drive containing 43,654 
square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
(Colony Acres Area), i 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

2. Petition of Mrs. E.S. 
Garcia for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Clasiification from R-3 
Residential District to R 6 
Residential District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 1490 feet 
Southwest of the 
intersection of Colony Drive 
and London Bridge Road 
and 244 feet North of Colony 
Drive, running a distance of 
1475 feet more or less along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 1742 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line, and 
running a distance of 1570 
feet more or less along the 
Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 29.7 
acres. (Colony Acres 
Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Mr*; E.S. 
Garcia for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification fro/n R-3 
Residential District to A-1 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 1280 feet more or 
less North of Colony Drive, 
running a distance of 215 
feet more or less along the 
West side of London Bridge 
Road, running a distance of 
2660 feet more or less along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 605 
feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 1710 feet more 
or less along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 34 acres. Plats 
with more detailed 
information are available 
in the Department of 
Planning. Planning 
Commission recommends a 
modification to . R-9 
Residential Townhouse 
District. (Colony Acres" 
Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

Richard Webbon 
City Clerk 

Apr. 17,24,21 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
4<9^ttt Court of th« City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 5th 
day ot April, 1974. 
Joseph Kent Hough, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Conda Lyf»n Hough, 
Defendant. 

The obiect ol this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the ground«i 
ot desertion as ol December 
15, 1972 and lasting for a 
period ot more than one year. 
And an aHidavit having been 
made and filed thai due 
diligence has been used by or 
in behalf of the complainant 
to ascertain in which county 
or corporation the defend»»t 
is, without effect, the last 
known post office aodress 
being: Apt. 303, 1351 Pine 
Cone Circle, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. It Is ordered that 
she do appear here within 
ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, wid do 
whay may be necessary to 
protect her Interest in this 
suit. 

A copy— teste: John V 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove, 
Deputy Clerk 
Boyce & Spanoulis 
105 N Plaza Trail 
Virginta Beach, Virginia 

4-»«,l7,24,$.MT 



OR DEN OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth ol Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court ol the City of 
Virginia Beach, on tite 5th 
day ot April, 1974. 
Doris June Lovegrove, aka, 
PlaintiH. 

against 
Jackson Earl Pugh, 
Defendant. 

The obiect ol this suit is to 
obtain an annulment from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of defendant was not 
tree to marry. And an af- 
fidavit having been made 
and filed that due dillgerice 
has been used by or on behalf 
ot the Complainant to 
ascertain in what county or 
corporation the defendant Is, 
without effect, the last known 
post office'address t)eing: c o 
Woodrow Pugh, 3200 
Tidewater Drive, Norfolk. 
Va. It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days alter due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Smith, Power & Owens 
1412 Maritime Tower 
Norfolk, VA p.q. 

Apr. 10.17,24— May 1,4t 

ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 4th DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 
In re: 

CHANGE OF NAME OF 
LANCE WAYNE 
SCHLAMEUS 
By: ROSEMARY 
CARLISLE 
Petitioners 

To: Mr. Kermit R. 
Schiameus 

CO Albert Einstein Medical 
Center (Soulhside) 
Old York 8. Taylor Roads 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
in Chancery No. C-73,1463 
This day came 

ROSEMARY CARLISLE, 
Petitioner, and represented 
that the obiect of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
Change of Name of the 
abov« named infant, 
LANCE WAYNE 
SCHLAMEUS, by 
ROSEMARY CARLISLE, 
and affidavit having been 
m^de and filed that 
KERMIT R. SCHLAMEUS, 
a natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: c-o Albert 
Einstein Medical Center 
(Southside) Old York 8. 
Taylor Roads, Phila 
cteiphia, Pennsylvania, 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said KERMIT R. 
SCHLAMEUS appear 
before this Court within ten 
(10) days after publication 
of this Order and indicate 
his attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 
A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J, Curtis Fruit D.C. 
WILLIAM H.COLONA, JR. 
pq. 

281 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 
Apr. 10,17,24— May 1, 4f 

^^^"ordeS"'"""''^ 

virginia: in the 
clerk's office of 
the circuit court of 
the city of virginia 

BEACH, ON THE 4th DAY 

OF APRIL, 1974. 

In re: Adoption of Emma 

Diane Bridges 8> Teresa 

Ann Bridges 

By Clarence Raymond 

Kinney 8, Carolyn Millner 

Kinney 

Petitioners 

In Chancery No. C74-431 

To: Donald O. Bridges 

Route No. 1, Box 540 

Summerville, South 

Carolina 

This day came Clarence 
Raymond Kenney and 
Carolyn Millner Kinney, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the obiect 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant (s), 
Emma Diane Bridges 8< 
Teresa Ann Bridges, by 
Clarence Raymond Kinney 
and Carolyn Millner 
Kinney, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Donald 
O. Bridges, a natural 
parent of said child (ren),is 
a non resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
Route No. 1, Box 540, 
Summerville, South 
Carolina. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Donald 0. 
Bridges appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his-her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or ^ 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protec^;^ls 
interest in this matter. " 
A copy teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove DC. 
Robert L. Bohannon p.q. 
402 Plaza One 
NOrfO*. VA 23510 

4 1 0,17,24,5 1,4 t 

- Cgmmonweaith of Virginia, 
*'^n the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 2nd 
day of April, 1974. 
Lawrence Val OeSpain, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
a LinOa Kaye OeSpain, 
Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 
Theobiectof thissuit isto 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro, to be later merged 
into a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
groundsof willful desertion. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or in t^half Of the 
complainant to ascertain m 
which county or 

corporation ihe defendant 
is without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 574S University 
Place, Apt. 102, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, it Is 
ordered that he do apear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof , and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A COpv-^Tlste: John V. 
Fentress, Cltrk 
By: J. Curt™ Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Branch H Daniels ^ 
III indepaAtfenca 



•t 



Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 
Apr. 10,17,14— May l,4t 

ViRGINfA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 3rd DAY OF APRIL, 
1974. 

In Chancery 
No. C 74 412 

TERRAPIN HILL 

INVESTMENT 

CORPORATION, a Virginia 

corporatton. Complainant 

vs 

FRANKLIN LEE 

PENNINGTON 

and 

HENRIETTA GARRETT 

PENNINGTON 

and 

The surviving spouse and- 

or spouses of the defendants 

Franklin Lee Pennington 

and Henrietta Garrett 

Pennington, if they are 

deceased, and the heirs, 

devisees and successors in 

title of said defendants and 

all of the heirs, devisees 

and successors in title of D. 

Stormont, if any there be, 

who have not conveyed 

their interest in the 

property mentioned in this 

suit, all of whom are made 

parties defendant by the 

general description of 

"Parties Unknown", 

Defendants 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobiectof thissuit isto 
quiet title to real property 
located in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
which the complainant Itas 
purchased from the heirs of 
D. Stormont. 

And an Affidavit having 
been made that fhe 
defendants, Franklin Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Pennington (if 
living) are not residents of 
the State of Virginia and 
their last known address is 
Franklin lee Pennington 
and Henrietta Garrett 
Pennington Silver 
Springs, Maryland and 
said affidavit further 
setting forth that there are 
or may be "Parties 
Unknown" and that such 
have been ioined In the Bill 
of Complaint and that said 
"Parties Unknown", if any, 
consist of the heirs, 
devisees and successors in 
title of Franklin Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Pennington (if one 
or both are deceased) and 
the heirs and devisees and 
successors in title of D. 
Stormont, who are not 
listed in the List of Heirs for 
D. Stormont In Will Book 7 
at page 83 of the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
ol the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia (if any 
there be); 

it is ORDERED that the 
defendants Franklin Lee 
Pennington and Henrietta 
Garrett Pennington who 
are not residents of the 
State of Virginia and the 
persons made defendants 
by the general description 
of "Parties Unknown" do 
appear here 'wltMb'finf days 
after due publication of this 
Order and do what is 
necessary to protect their 
interest. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published 
once a week for four 
successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

Frank E. Butler, III, 

Attorney for the 

Complainant 

4336 Va. Beach Blvd. 

Va. Beach, Va. 

4-10,17,24,5-1-41 

VIRGINIA; IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 8th DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 

In Chancery 

NoC-74-425 
In re: Adoption of Tracy 
Lee Evans 

By: Trussie Dellette 
Rogers, Jr. and Suzanne 
Rebecca Jones Evans 
Rogers, Petitioners 
To: Lucian Tello Evans 
2717 Bywood Avenue 
Chesapeake, Virginia 

ORDKR 

This day came Trussie 
Dellette Rogers, Jr. and 
Suzanne Rebecca Jones 
Evans Rogers, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
obiect of this proceeding is 
to effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Tracy 
Lee Evans, by Trussie 
Dellette Rogers, Jr. and 
Suzanne Rebecca Jones 
Evans Rogers, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Lucian Teilt) Evans, a 
natural parent of said child, 
is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, t^ last 
known post office address 
being: 2717 Bywood 
Avenue, Chesapeake, 
Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Cucian Tello 
Evans appear before this. 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his-her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary tq^ arotect his 
interest In this matter. 

John y. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove DC. 

Bashara 8, Hut>bard 
Board of Trade BIdg. 
Norfolk, VA 

4 .10,17,24,5-l-4t 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 1st DAY 
OF APRIL, 1974. 

In Chancery 

No C74 413 
In re: Adoption of Daniel 
Scott Merchant 
By: Samuel Clair Button 8i 
Karen jean Button, 
Petitioners 

To: StPvw I Kacvinsky 
Route NO, 3 
Ashland, Wiscof«in 54806 

ORDER 

Thisdav came Samuel Clair 
Button and Karen Jean 
Button, Petitioners, and 
retresenf ad that the object of 
this proceeding is to effect 
the adoptto* of t»» *ove 



named infant, Daniel Scott 
Merchant, by Samuel Clair 
Buttoa and Karan Jtan 
Button, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Steven j. 
Kacvimky, a natural parent 
01 said child, is a non- 
resident ol the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: Route 
No. 3, Ashland, Wisconsin 
54806 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said Steven J, Kacvinsky 
appear before thl& Court 
within ten (10) days, after 
publication of this Order and 
indicate his attitude toward 
the proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D.C. 

Herbert & Bohannon 
Plaza One 
Norfolk, VA 

4-3,!0,17,24-4t 

Commonwealth ol Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Olflce of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 1st 
day of April, 1974. 
Mary Wade Hosley, Plaintiff, 
against 
Alfred 0. Hosley, Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLltATION 

The obiect ol this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
AAalrimonii Irom the said 
defendant, upon Ihe grounds 
ol desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post offfce address 
being: 161 North Arlingron 
Avenue, Apartment 29, East 
Orange, New Jersey 07018, 

If is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk 

Owen, Guy, Rhodes Si Betz 
525 Pembroke One 
Virginia Beach, VA 

4-3,10;i7,24-4t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on ths 
28th day of March, 1974. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Alberta Biilups Boyd, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Dallas Boyd, 

Defendant. 

Theobiectof thissuit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of two year separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence haa been used 
by or in behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain in 
which county or corporation 
the defendant Is without 
effect, he last known post 
office address being: 5304 
Pandora Avenue, VIrgnIa 
Beach, Virginia 

It Is orderad that ho do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Tidewater Legal Aid 

Society 

700 Duke Street 

Norfolk, Virginia 

4-3, 10, 17, 24, 4T 

Commonwealth of Viroinia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, oo the 27th 
day of March, 1974. 

ORDEROF 
" PUBLICATION 

Willla Earl Gray, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Phyllis Jean Sadler Gray, 

Defendant, 

Theobiectof this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
AW Oak Street, Roanoke 
Rapids, North Carolina 

it is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect heatsP 
JjP^erest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Gerald J. Burlap 
2410 E, Little Creek Rd, 
Norfolk, VA 



4-3, 10, 17, 24, 4f, 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT CpURT OF ^ 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON T«E 29th OF 
March 1974. 

INCHANCERY 
NO.C 74 386 

In re: Adoption of Carl 

Eugene Murray 

By: Russell Alan Elder & 

Edith Marie Wood Elder, 

Petitioners 

To: Roy David Murray, Jr. 

723 Redgate Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Russell 
Alan Elder and Edith Marie 
Wood Elder, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
obiact of this proceeding is 
to effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Carl 
Eugene Murray, by Russell 
Alan Elder and Edith Marie 
Wood Elder, husband and 
wife, and affidavit haviifg 
been made and filed that 
Roy David Murray, Jr., a 
iwturat parent of said child, 
wtwraabeuts Is unknown, 
and that du«| diligence has 
been uMd by or in b^alf of 



said petitioners to ascertain 
in which county or 
corporation the said natural 
parent is, without effact, 
the last known post office 
address being 723 Redgat* 
Avenue, Norfolk. Virginia. 
It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said Roy David 
Murray, Jr. pppeLar before 
this court within ten (10) 
days after publication of 
this Order and Indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V, Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 

JANET B. BURT, 
Attorney for the Petitioners 
1369 Laskin Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23451 

4-3,10,17, 24-41 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
28th day of March, <1974. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Elaine Robinson HarjBar. 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Thedford Harper, 

Defendant. 

The obiect of thissuit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii vfrom the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds ol Two Year 
Separation. 

An an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident 
ol the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: 1805 
Williowbridge Road, 
Aparlmeni 311, Jollel 
Illinois 

it is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publicatioiL, 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect hl» 
Interest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D. C. 



'naSun-WedneKlay, April 17, 1974-h(e B-7 
Interest in this suit. 



Tidewater Legal 
700 Duke St. 
Norfolk, VA 



Aid 



4-3, iq, 17, 24, 4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 
the Ciurcult Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 28th day of March, 1974. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Grace Lambe Michels, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Jeffrey Wood Michels 

Defendant. 

Theobiect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or on behalf of the 
plaintiff to ascertain In 
which county or 

corporation the defendant 
Is without effect; the last 
known post <^Ce address 
being; 4410 Holly Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va 23451 

it is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C, 

MOrphy, Bennett li 

Basnight 

3330 Pacific Ave. 

Virginia Beach, VA 

43,10,17, 24, 4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia BeaCh, on the 
29th day of March, 1974. 
Genevieve H. Furst, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Maynard Joseph Furst, 
Defendant, 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The obiKt of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii Irom the said 
defendant, Upon the 
grounds of desertion, 
' And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State ol 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being; c 
Kay Carment, Quarters 
F. Berry Dr., Ml. View, 
Calif, 94940. 

it is ordered that he do 

^appear here within t^ft (tO) 

""days after due publrcition 

hereof, and do what may be 

necessary to protect his 

intcra^i^i this suit. 

JOHN V. F€NTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY : SANDRA HARGROVE 

D, Clerk. 

Grover C. Wright, Jr. 
3330 Pacific Ave 
Virginia Beach, VA 
4 3,10,17.24 41 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 

the Circuit Court of the City 

»6f Virginia Beach, on Ihe 

28th day of March, 1974, 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Nanette Fay Allen Reedy, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Richard Alien Reedy, 

Defendant. 

Theobiect of thissuit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii Irom the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds Of cruelty 
tantamount to desertion 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
711 Baker Str^t, Lansing, 
michi«an 

It a orifered that he do 
appear hare within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof , and do whaJ may be 
necessary to ^Otect his 



JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Tidewater Legal Aid 
700 Duke St. 
Norfolk, VA. 

4 3, 10, 17, 24, 4T 

Commonwealth ol Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Olflce of Ihe 
Circuit Court ol the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 23nd 
day of March, 1974. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

\ 
Gerald Franklin Wilkinson, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Delia Agullar Wilkinson, 
Defendant, 

The obiect («Uhi5 suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an aHidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Tucson, Arizona. 
< It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days alter due publication 
hereoi, and do what may be 
necessary to, protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V, 'Fentress; Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove; D. Clerk. 

Henry L. Sadler, III " 
210 Atlantic National Bank 
BIdg. 
Norlolk, VA 

3, 27, 4 3, 10, 17-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Off ice of the 
Circuit Court ol the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 19th 
day ot March, 1974, 
Linwood Melvin Gurganutr 
-HNaloJJft, 

against "" • -— »■ 
Tassie May Gurganus, 
Defendant 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 



The obiect ol this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
ot the parties having lived 
separate and apart for mof* 
than two (2) years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by or 
inbehalf ot the complainant 
lo ascertain in what county 
or corporation the defendant 
Is without effect, the last 
known posi office address 
being; Portsmouth, Virginia 

it is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary lo protect her 
Intlrent in this suit. 
A copy— Teste; John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By; J, Curtli Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

James i, Consolvo 3221 
Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

I-27,4-3,10,17-'4t 

Commonwealth ol Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 20th 
day of March, 1974 
Barbara Clyde Garrlngton 
Talberi, Plaintiff 

against r 

Louis Herman Talberf, Jr., 
Defendant 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The obiect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii Irom the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of continuous separation for 
more than two years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident of 
the State ol Virginia, Ihe last 
known post office address 
being: Louis Herman 
Talberi, Jr„ c-o Waller J. 
Bailesteros, 316 Main Street, 
Registerslown, Maryland 
21136 

It IS ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days alter due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary lo protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy-Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove, D. 
Clerk 

Fine, Fine, Legum 8i Fine 720 
Law BIdg. Norfolk, Va. 

3-2M1.1ll.>7,4f 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office ol the 
Circuit Court of the Clfy Ol 
Virginia Beach on the 20lh 
day ot March, 1974 
Sidney C, While, Plaintiff, 
against 

Barbara S, White, Defendant 

ORDEROF 

PUBLICATION 

The obiect of this suit is to 

obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 

Thoro lo be later merged into 

a divorce A Vinculo 

Matrimonii from ttte said 

fieiendant, upon the grounds 

of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that Ihe 
rtefendanl is not a resident of 
the State ot Virginia, the last 
known post office atMress 
being: General Delivery, 
Chapman«dJ4$, WesI Vi^^^ /, 
25508 

II is ordered that she do 
appear here withi^ ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and d<f what may be 
necessary ♦oiiprotect her 
inferesl in thissuit. 
A copy-~T*st»r JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Smk-a Hargrove D, 
Clerk 

Bashara t, Hubbard Board of 
Trade BIdg, Norfolk, VA, * 

3-27,4-3,10,17,41 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach on the 22nd 

day of AAarch, 1974 

Sandra J. Strickland, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Jackie Lee Strickland, 

Defendant 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 
Ttie obiect of this suit is to 

obtain a divorce A Mefisa Et 

Thoro to t3« later merged into 

a divorce A Vinculo 

Matrimonii from tha said 

defendant, Mfm the groim^ 

of deserti«». 
And an affMavit having 

been mwie and filed thM m* 

defeniMit is not a reslMil M 

the State o> vu^^ia. f 

known post Wflce ' 



W«f-"f'^'??f'^-'tf-SUf -!-»f Hf 'i^-S'H-fii^-if fifif4W-fH"f'^-f-f"?-1l-4-^ Jf f-1-f ^^^uf-H -"I -»-?■*« *■ W^W'WWimimMK.KM, 



* *^^ * # 



■^^M^^^^Pfff 



^^Pi^^PiiWSPl!' 



■P^W^B^i^^ 



Clossiiiecl 



Page B-8-The Sun-Wedneiday. April 17, 1974 



486-S4K> 



J:ti 



LKULS 



•being; 250-88 9569 XO's Div 
MAA USS AMERICA CVA 66 
FPO New York, N.Y. 09501 
It is ordered tha» he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
day"^ after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary, to protect hi'- 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: J&St V. 
FENTRESS: CUEi 
BY: Sandra HsiMHVe O. 
Clerk 




Stuart R. 
Little Creek: 
23518 



Commonv^iifh of Virginia, 

In ihe Oerk's Office of the 
Circuii Court of the City oi 
Virginia Beach on the 22nd 
day ot March, 1974 
Ralph Willis Jefferson, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Evelyn Cleopatra Jefferson, 
DetendiMI 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
ctefendant, upon Ihe grounds 
ot two year separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the Stale of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being; 232 N. 19th Street, E. 
Orange, New Jersey 07017 

1 1 is ordered that she do 
appear here within 'en (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit, 
A copy-Test; JOHN V, 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Murphy, Bennett & Basnight 
3330 Pacific Ave. Virginia 
Beach, VA 

3-27,4-3,10,17,4! 



Virginia; 

IN THE CLERK'S 
OFFICE OF THE . 
CIRCUIT COURTOF 

THECITYOF 

VIRGINIABEACH 

on the 21 Day 

ot March, 1974 

STATE HIGHWAY COM 
MISSIONER OF VIRGINIA, 
Petitioner, 
vs. 

GLADYS BROWN, 
4776 Bonney Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 
WILLIAM LEE BROWN, 
JR., 

3134 Fairview Avenue, 
Chesapeake, Virginia; 
ROBERT C. BROWN, 
2324 Burger Street, 
Norfolk, Virginia; 
JESSE B. BROWN, 
18216 143rd Street, 
Springfield Garden, 
Long Island, New York; 
SYLVIA B. LAWRENCE, 
1258 Strand Street, 
Norfolk, Virginia; 
EILEEN M. BROWN, 
4776 Bonney Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 
PERCELL BROWN, 

—2847 Elgin Avenue, — "^ 

Baltimore, Maryland; 

JEFFREY BROWN, a 

minor, 

MILTON BROWN, a minor, 

DONNELL BROWN, a 

minor, 

YVETTE L. BROWN, a 

minor, 

TONY BROWN, a minor, 

BETTY JEAN BROWN, a 

minor. 

Serve: 

Gerald J. Burlage, 

Guardian ad Litem, 

Plaza One Building, 

Norfolk, Virginia; 

and 

0.254 Acre of Land, near 

Powell's Corner, Virginia 

Beach, Virginia, 

Defendants. 



desionatinq the property 
in which he claims to be in 
lerested, the grounds of any 
objection or defense to the 
taking or damaging of his 
property or to the jurisdic 
tion of the court to hear the 
case and to proceed with the 
appointment of com- 
missioners for the deter- 
mination of just com- 
pensation. 

Should any such owner fail 
to file his answer and 
grounds of defense as 
hereinabove provided, such 
failure shall not preclude the 
owner from appearing on the 
date set for the appointment 
of commissioners nor from 
presenting evidence as to 
valuation and damage nor 
from sharing in the award of 
justcompensation according 
to his interest therein or 
otherwise protecting his 
rights, but such failure shall 
preclude such owner from 
other defense by way of pleas 
in bar, abatement or 
otherwise. 

KELLAM, PICKRELL & 
LAWLER,p.q. 
(James M. Pickrell) 
1020 First 8r Merchants Bank 
Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

3-27,4-3,10,17,41 



ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

In this proceeding the 
Petitioner seeks to acquire 

by condemnation the fee 

simple title to a certain 
parcel of land containing 

0.254 acre, and known as 4776 
Bonney Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, which 
property is to be used for the 
improvement of a section of 
the Independence Boulevard 
Interchange on the Norfolk 
Virginia Beach Expressway 
(State Highway Route No. 
44), the nature of such im 
provement being more 
particularly described in the 
petition and exhibits at 
lached thereto on file in the 
office of the clerk of this 
court, to which reference is 
hereby made for a full and 
accuratedescription thereof; 
and for the appointment of 
commissioners to ascertain 
just compensation to the 
pawners of any estate or in- 
terest in the property to be 
taken or affected as a result 
of ttie takingind use thereof 
by Ihe petitioner. 

For such purposes, the 
petitioner will apply to the 
court, sitting at Princess 
Anne Station, VirgiQ.i^ 
Beach, Virginia, on the I'fitiT 
day of April, 1974 at 9:30 
o'clock Wt)-, or as soon 
thereafter as counsel may be 
heard, for the appointment of 
commissioners lo ascertain 
jusi compensation as 
aforesaid, and to obtain a 
date for the triM-o* the issue 
of iust compensation. 

And it appearing by af 
tidavit filed accortting to law 
that the following owners are 
not residents of the S'ate ot 
Virginia: Jesse B. Brown 182 

> 16 143rd Street, Springfield 
Garden, Lorfg Island, New 
York 11101. and Percjil 
Brown, 2847 Elgin Avenue, 
Baltimore. Maryland 21216; 
it is ORDERED that the 
aforesaid owners do appear 
within ten ( 10) days after due 
^niblication of this order in 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and do (Wiat is necessary to 
protect their interest, and it 
is FURTHER ORDERED 
that if any of ttie above 
Ntmed owners wishes to 
assort «nr objection or 
a i fin» t« the taking or 
damaoing <^ his prt^jerty q/r 
to the (i^ttittctten o» tft# osurt 
10 hew the e»se and » 
^ocMd wHD ih« mi^ 
pewtifrwfil o# c«mm*»»i«W^ 
h« utali fil* hti aifswcr aM 
flfwind* of ^♦♦wM 



A -Copy Teste: John V. 

Fentress, Clerk 

By Gladys J. Conbag, D.C. 

VIRGINIA: * 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON THE 
21ST DAY OF MARCH, 1974 
In Chancery 
No. C 74-213 
FRANK E. BUTLER, III, 
Executor, etc.. Complainant 
vs 

FRANCES ENDES EBELT, 
ET ALS, Defendants 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
determine the manner of 
distribution of the probate 
estate of Rosalind Russall 
Walton, deceased. 

And an Affidavit having 
been made that Frances 
Endes Ebell, 261 Andover, S. 
E., Kentwood, Michigan, 
Martha Peters, 10440 
Poderosa, El Paso, Texas, 
Dorothy Caldwell Palumbo, 
7401 Shore Road, Apli, l-C, 
Brooklyn, New York and 
Violet Caldwell Wolfe, Route 
2, Box 209, Darlington, 
Maryland are not residents 
oi this State (Virginia) and 
the affidavit further stating 







DrAL-486-3430 



QUICK CHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Sunitilni Ml 1 

Ptrsonal Notkn ] 

SPKliI S«rvlc« 1 

Trani|»rt(tion 4 

LmI I Found 5 

Card of Thonia « 

In Mtmorlom ; 

AAonumanti-Burlal Lot* 1 



AUTOMOTIVE 



Automoblltilor Sat* II 

Trucks, Trallon, Jtapa 11 

WanlKl Automotiv* iia 

Aufos, Trocl<« for hir* IJ 

Auto Parts, Repairs 14 

AutoAcc«s..PalntlnB I4A 

Utility Trallan 15 

■uias I5A 

Wanltd Trailers ISB 

AMtorcvclas, Scootars la 

Aircraft for sals, parts 17 



I RECREATIONAL \ 

Campers, Trailers I» 

RecVeWcles for hire IIA 

Camp, Sports Equip rt 

Beach Supplies , 20 

Boats, Marine Supplies 21 

Boats for Hire 21A 



I EMPLOYMENT j 

Help Wanted 34 

Resumes, Listings 35 

Jobs Wanted 3t 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



Apartments Furnlsliad 73 

Apartments, Unfurnjihad 74 

Garages for Rent 75 

Farms and Land for Rant 7« 

MoversStorage 7«a 

Houses for Rent 77 

Furnlslied Houses 77A 



MERCHANDISE | 

Articles for Sale SI 

Antiques 51A 

Household Goods ,.S2 

GarageRummage SIA 

Wanted to Buy 53 

SwapTrade 5JA 

AAusical Merchandise 54 

TV.RadloStereo 55 

Electronic Equipment 55A 

Coins and Stamps sa 

Jewelry & Watches 57 

Wearing Apparel S7A 

Good Things to Eat 51 

Farm and Dairy Products 5IA 

Flr*»»od S» 

Lawn and Garden M 

Seeds Plants Flowers tOA 

Feed and Fertlllter t) 

Farm Implements aiA 

Machinery and Tools 52 

Building Materials a 

Business Eouipment M 



I MOBILE HOMES j 

Mobile Homes for Sale as 

Atabile Homes for Rent aSA 

Mobile Home Movers aSB 

Mobile Home Sites ta 

Mobile Homes Wanted ««A 



idiia 



FINANCIAL 



J t 



Business Opportunities 3* 

Wanted to Buy Business 3aA 

Stocks and Bonds M 

Loaifs Mortgages 40 

Wanted to Borrow 41 



ROOMS-HOTELS 



(s?^ 



Rooms with Board 

Rooms without Board 

Rooms lor Housekeeping 

Resorts Motels 

Restaurants 

Wanted Rooms or Board 



»7 
M 

at 

70 



that there are or may be 
persons interested in the 
Estate of Rosalind Russell 
Walton whose names afe 
unknown and said persons 
having been joined in this 
cause as "Parties 
Unknown". 

It is ORDERED that the 
defendants Frances Endes 
Ebelt, Martha Peters, 
Dorothy Caldwell PalUmbo, 
and Violet Caldwell Wolfe 
who are not residents of the 
State of Virginia and the 
persons made defendant by 
the general description of 
"Parties Unknown" do 
appear here within ten days 
after due publication of this 
Order and do what Is 
necessary to protect their 
interests. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this Order be published once 
a weeK tor tour successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun. . 

A Copy Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

I ASK FOR THIS:Frank E. 
Butler, III 

3 2 7,43,10,17,41 



3 Special SavjcM 



DRESSMAKING — And 
Alterations. 10 yrs. 
experience. 4970982. 

FURNITURE 

UPHOLSTERED — in my 
home. Very reasonable 
rates. Call Mrs. Smith, 464- 
4579. 

Foot Massage by qualified 
Foot reflexology Therapist 
located at Va. Beach, for 
appointment 425-8163. 



REDUCE SAFE 8. FAST 
with GoBese Tablets 8, E- 
Vap "water pills", Barr's 
Drug. 



e 



18 CampeitB, Tniteii 

AIRSTREAM TRAILER — 
1969 31 ft. Solvient, 
excellent condition. Slightlv 
used by Isf owner. $7,000 or 
best offer. 340-7704. 

19 Camp, Sporti Equip. 



Ml^Wtato^l 



REAL ESTATE SALES 
ASSOCIATES — We have 
expanded our Windsor 
Woods olflceand still have 
room for a few good 
salesmen and trainees. 
Come see what we have to 
offer! Call HIggins Realty, 
486-4041 for appointment. 



4S Ww^ imtracftom 



bMincti 



SiGooA 



REDUCE Safe 8. Fast with 
GOBESE Tablets 8< EVap 
"water pills", MURDEN 
DRUGS. 



Tell Someone 
You Care With a 
Sun Nowspaper 

Sunshine Ad 

•Willi MiRiOM a Um birtktai 
•CMfntaltta friandt m Ikiir 

••Pltaait 
•SMd MilMrMni |ri«lla|s 
•CMfratiMi ■(■ pifNli 
•801 y«|i|i ■Mn 
•Caairataiaimn on if Kill 

icbJawatnli 
•Or |«it My "HfUO" li a 

ipicial «i| 
laak far SaailiiBa Il4i nirj wHb 
in Ik* Clittifiad SictitR 
af Tka Virfiaia Baich Stn. 

Call Classified 
486-3430 



Beforj^ 5:00 P.M. 
To Place Your 
Sunshine Ad 



AUTOJUNK 

TOWED 
AWAY FREE 

ANYTIME 
8557488 



FISHING 

ROD & REEL 
REPAIR 
& SERVICE 

486-1296 
after 6 P.M. 



21 Boats, Marine Supplies 

AUTHORIZED 

T-CRAFT DEALER 
JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOIVIES 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY! 

6 men and women to start 
In good paying iob. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided. 

No experience necessary. 
We will train you. 

Call 499-2763 



Intamational Ohiob Studo; 
Ptmbroke Mall 



WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
r the dozen or by the bushel. 
Earl Smith Oyster Qp., 947 - 



497.2731 or 499-f94Ji 
DM you kmnrttaf ididi 
dancii^ ii back? Tky oui 
intiodiKt(ay o^fer wifli 
host! lim uid Judy 
Itadgiiti. We ue located 
between Sens and Leraeis 
■t PEMBROKE MALL 



m 



GROW YOUR OWN fruit! 
Free copy 48 pg. Planting 
■Suide Catalog In cplor, of- 
fered by Virginia's largest 
growers of fruit trees, nut 
trees, berry plants, grape 
vines, landscaping plant 
material. Waynesboro 
Nurseries-Wavnesboro,, 
Vlrgfnle 22980. ^ ■ 



63 ftiada^ Materials 



36JobiWtnted 



FH:8S5-2S10 



S Lost & Found 



LOST — AFGHAN HOUND 
- Cream with black maslc. 
Clipped under neck and 
behind legs. Answers to 
"Sonja". Lost in Lynn 
Meadows area on S. 
Lynnhaven rd. LARGE 
REWARD! 583-5222, Room 
211.- 



S 



34HelpWuited 



8 Burial Lots 



CEMETERY LOT — 
Rosewood Memorial Park, 
1 lot, 4 graves; in the 
Garden of the Last Supper. 



426-7767. 



^1 



11 Automobiles For Sale 



ALARM INSTALLATION 
a SALES 

MEN 
NEEDED 
NOW 

$150 a week Salary 
Call Mr. Nelson 1% 857-5442 



HAIRbRESSERS. 


VIVIANWOODARD 


BEAUTY 


CONSULTANTS. 


Immediate openings, full 


or part-time. Call Mrs. 


Vesely, 340 3230, 420-6808.1 



CHEVROLET 1963, 



Convertible. Inspected. 
S1S0. 4868623. 

CHRYSLER — New 
Yorker, 1970. 4 dr. hardtop. 
Excel, cond. $1495. Davis 
Corner Motors, 497-8100. 



INSURANCE Secretary — 

Insurance agency has 

ca r ee r 

individual interested in 

becoming ao insurance 

secretary. Cal> 425-7220. 



BABYSITTING in my 
home. Infant to 3 years. 428- 
4058. 

BABYSITTING — In my 
home or yours. Available 
anytime, fall 490-2292 

CHILD DAY CARE — for 
working mothers In my 
home. Lynnhaven area. 
Reasonable. 481-0410. 

LITTLE FRIEND to play 
with, my mommy will take 
care of you while yours 
works. Windsor Woods. 340- 
6765. 

NEED CHALLENGE 

Creative vouno man, 
impatfeni with bureaucracy, 
places restless finger in the 
wind, for opportunity to 
fully utilize talents. Experi 
ence in law and 
administration, able 
organizer, coordinator and 
troubleshooter, excellent 
writer, individualistic In 
style and interest, yet can 
motivate others with 
diplomacy and right touch 
of humor. Will consider 
travel or relocation, 
part ne r s h i p or 
employment, any form of 
challenge! Write Box C250, 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. 




47 Dop, Cats, Otiier Pets 

BASSET HOUNDS — Male, 
Female, 3 years old. 
Registered. 486-3058. 

BEAGLES — 1 male 8 weeks, 
$25; Ml mos. old, $35. 583- 
3176. 

CHIHUAHUAS — AKC. 
Adult male, also puppies, 
$85. 340-1636. 

HAMSTERS 

With cages 
$5 each 486-3699 

PEKEA-POO Pups. Wor- 
med. 1 temporary shot. 
Males. 420 6288. 

RABBITS — Babies, white 
81 colored. California 8, New 
Zealand mixed. 497-8790. 

RABBITS — Adult and 
Babies, Checkers & Dutch. 
486-6324. 

SAMOYED — male. 
Excellent with children. 
Amateur prize . winner. 497- 
9177. 



HQME Builders t, Con- 
tractors ■ Let us hdp you 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions e^ repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAMt EATON 427-3200. 

tij >w»liiaM equlpmant 

RENT OR BUY — new & 
used office furniture. Ex- 
rental desks $49 & up. New 
damaged files $39 & up. Free 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397-7883 



73 Agartmants-Furnls.hail ' 

TO SHARE — Small 
cottage near ocean. Woman 
only. 428-1804. 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

Vsinie. rates; ] room «)Nci*ncy 
WMkl y anil month ly rat*$ ; color TV , 
basic «atlng and cooking utahslls. all 
utilltlts. 

VIRGINIAN 

MOTOR APTS. 

310 24 til St. 

428*5333 



op p o rtu ni t y — for — R o s em oftt^4td^-m 
Beach, Va. 23452. 



PUPPIES (6) Free to good 
homes. 116 London Bridge 
rd., 486-8604 ... 



76 A MoveifrSton^ 

FURNITURE MOVING — 
Washers, dryers, 
refrigerators. Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a week and 
holidays no extra charge. 
853^9^ 

WILL MOVE ANYTHING, 
24 hours a day, 7 days a 
week! Don't delay. Call 
today! 588-4715. 



=n===-_ 51 Articles For Safe 



RATES: "Person to 
Person" ads for individuals 
buying, selling, renting, or 
offering a service. Up to 12 
words, only $1 per issue, 
add 50 cents for each 
additional 4 words. 

Classified display $2.52 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: 25 cents 
per line, minimum charge 
of $2.00. 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
publication. In column 
classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

P>ace ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd., 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mail to Classified Desk; or 
phone 486 3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



CONTINENTAL 1967 

Lincoln, $800. 464-3693. 



FORD— 1972 LTD, 4 door 
hardtop, fully equipped. Call 
545 3480. 

FIREBIRD - 1973, VB, 
Automatic. Just assume 
balance, Call after 6 — 427- 
1451. 



OPENINGS FOR 
3 PEOPLE 

Work part or full time. Good 
Steady income in your area, 
no experience necessary. For 
appointment, call 623-4641. 



FORD — 1973 Pinto Squire 
Station Wagon, air 
conditioned. 420 1152. 



PONTIAC — 1967 Ventura, 
air conditioned, low 
mileage. lowner. 
Excellent cond. $750. 340- 
2753. ^ 

PINTO— 1973, Air cond., 
automatic, rhany extras, new 
tires. 853 1353. 

PLYMOUTH — 1973 
Duster, 6 cylinder 
automatic, air cond., power 
steering, very clean. $2595. 
427 3498. 



LADIES 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company will train 3 ladies 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 

$610 month 10 start 
Plus bonuses and benefits 

Call 499-2763 



PAINTER— Feminine touch. 
Commercial and residential. 
Call 428-0293. 

38 Bu siness Opportunities 

A CHANCE TO 

SUCCEED— develop your 
own business. Call 340-1317 
after 5 PM. 



43A General Instrwctions 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
Morrisson, 428-0587. 



44 Music 



1-SUNSHINE ADS 

JOE — Wouldn't take a 
million dollars for this past 
weekend. Loved every 
minute of it. It's gonna be a 
long week! ! Fuzzy. 

MAMA BEAR — A hug and 
kiss, from Pappa Bear. 

TOM — Being married to 
you is the greatest thing 
that ever happened to me. 
I'll love you forever. Diane 

. j- 

(TO THE ABOVE) 

MUSH!!! The Genius!! 

BILL — Thanks for being 
Cupid. S. 

MINDY 8. PAMMY JO - 
Miss you both. Love you. 
Mom. 

TONY— Thanks for the boat 
ride. Hope I can go again 
soon. S. 



RENAULT 

Ttie nations largest selection of 
used Renaults from ttie nation's 
largest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices AAost 
are one owner cars witti our 
famous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E LITTLE CREEK RD. 588 
1334 



MALE OR FEMALE 
Supervisor, 3 hours per day, 
3 to 5 evenings p6r week. 
Phone 464-4971. 

START YOUR OWN 
CAREER 

in a fast growing business. 
Unlimited prestige in 
expanding market. Sales 
experience or training 
helpful. For appt. call 497- 
2236. 



PIANO TEACHER - 
Beginners ihrough ad- 
vanced. Lessons in your 
home. 428 4670. 



GRIMES 

MUSIC SCHOOL 

Private Music Lessons in 

Pembroke Area 
5 String Banjo-Tenor B^njo- 
Uultar-Electrlc Bass-Hawa- 
iian Guitar-Mandolin. 

CaUAftef4P.M. 4991428 



VEGA — 1971, runs and 
looks good. Must sell. $1495, 
or best offer. 8539597. 

VOLKSWAGEN - '67. 
Perfect condition. Special 
$895. Davis Corner Motors, 
497 8100. 

VOLKSWAGFN 1970 Station 
Wagon. Excellent condition. 
FM 8 track Stereo. $1650. 340 
2519, afternoons. 

16 Motorcycles, Scooters 

YAMAHA - 1973, 350 CC. 
$795. Call after 6 p.m. 425 
7048 



TELEPHONE 
SOLICITORS 

TOT PAY 
PLUS COMMISSION 

TUES. & THURS. 
FROM 

5:30 to 8:30 P.M. 

excellent 
Working Conditions 

EXPERIENCED ONLY 
NEED APPLY 

Call 486-3430 

Between 9 5 
Monday thru Friday 



48 Garage - Rummage 



SALE 


Picnic Tables, Bunk Beds, 


Chairs, Tools. 


EVERYTHING 


FOR THE HOME 


ANDGARDEN 


April 27-9 AM to 3 PM 


4 H Camp Farrar 


85th St. 


Virginia Beach 



AIR CONDITIONERS, 6,000 
BTU, $100, 8,000 (Casement) 
$100 , 18,500 , $125, e)icellent 
condition. 486-1691. 

GRANDFATHER CLOCKS— 
Large Mahogany and 
walnut. Westminister 
chimes. 588-3126. 

INSULATION — 3Vj" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1379. 

52 Houiehohl Goods 

$458.00 delivers 3 room 
outfit, Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. ISt 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of Tidewater dr., in 
Norfolk, Phone 622-4165. 

2 SOFAS — (New) Early 
American Sofa, $250, 1 Hld«- 
a bed, $50. 490-0216. 

FURNITURE from Model 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room, $99.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recliner, 
Bunk Beds, $68 each ; Maple 
Boston Rocker, $45. Easy 
terms. Call Mr. Kay at 622- 
5140, dealer. 

53 Wanted to Buy 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band Instruments, 
Typewriters, guns. 

LITTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 622-6989 



77 Houses for Rant 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA ^ 
^ 3300 Rainier Ct., 3 
bedrbom Townhouse, 
fenced yard, $225 mo. All 
appliances including 
washer and dryer. 

78 Resort Proparty-Rant 

HOUSES 8. 
APART/V»ENTS 
Availablie on a yearly or 
short term basis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 
323Lasklnrd. |k 

428-4882 




52A H^KS, Cattle, Etc. 



i 



INSTRUCTION 



Correspondence Caurse .42 
Local instruction Classes 43 

General Instructions 43A 

Music Dance Dramatics 44 

Private Instructions 45 

Instructions Wanlad 4a 



Resort Property lor Rent 
Suburban for Rent 
Out of Town for Rent 
Wanted to Rem 
For Rent or Sale 
Ground Leases 
Business Places for Rent . 
Off Ices and Desk Space 
Industrial tor Renf 



*%^ j^Special ^rvfees 



:7«A 
71 B 
7» 
M 
MA 
II 
■1A 
•IB 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



3 



IreTS-UVESTOCKi 



009S, Cats, other Pets 47 

Pet Sfud Service 47A 

Horses. Cattle. Etc 4i 

Poultry & Supplies 49 

Wanted Livestock 4tA 



DIRECTORIES 



NOMi SEavica-aiPAiR ouibe 

Under Real Estate 



industrial for Sale lie 

Business Property Sale t3 

Investment Property tJA 

Apartments for Sale |2B 
Farms Land Timber . |3 

Real Estate Notices 14 

For Sale Norfolk is 

ForSale Virginia Beacf\ M 

For Sale Ciiesapeake 17 

For Sale Portsmouth M 

Condominiums 8iA 

Suburban for Sale W 

Resort Property lor Sale »1 

Out of Town for Sale M 

Lots lor Sale n 

Exchange Real Estate ?4 

For Saleor Exctiange 95 

Wanted Real Estate 9* 

New Homes for Sale »7 




38_Biisiiie»Opp^tuiWK 



AFGI^NS - 
t mv ' pffetty 
afghfns", all 
486 6627. 



"Come see 

crocheted 

colors. $35, 



ALTERATIONS Ladies, 
Mens, Childrens, 18 years 
experience. Near Hilltop. 
Pick up and delivery in 
Laskin Rd. 8. Beach area. 
Reasonable. 428 2283. 



SPARE TIME BUSINESS 

Own your own profitable vending business. $200 io $60^month' 
ly earnings possible in your spare time (day or eve.). NO 
SELLING. If selected, you will be servicing tompany established 



locations. 



!^ 



ALTERATIONS 8. 

SEWING, also Crocheted 
Bikinis, 486 0008 

AUTO JUNK 

Towed Away Free 
Call 855-4372 



WE TOW 

JUNK CARS 
623 9194 



4- 



IH.ACE A "PERSON TO PERSON" AD 

IN ANY OF THE ABOVE CLASSIFICATIONS 

CALL 4S6-3430 



BLOOD DONORS 
NEEDED 
Earn immediate cash. $40 to 
SM a month. Blood plasma 
urgently needed. 



NORFOLK 
PLASMA CORP. 



733Granby St. 



6233173 



CANDY THE CLOWN 
Birttidays, Promotionals, 
Grand Opwiings 587 3497 



OUR COMPANY IS A SUPPLIER 
OF NABISCO SNACK ITEMS. 

REQUIREMENTS: $1,000 lo $5,000 CASH INVESTMENT, 
(secured by machines and merchandise) 

good character, dependable auto, and 6 
to 9 spare hours weekly. Income starts 
immediately! We supply product,machines, 
locations, expansion ^nancing, buy back 
option, and professional guidance. If you 
are sincerely interested in applying for thi^ 
genuine opportunity toward financial 
success, please call or write (include 
phone number) for personal interview in 
your area to: ,^p, robIrt l. Anderson 

WORLD INDUSTRIES INC. 
Executive Suite 303 
1919 East 52nd Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 462(^ 
Telephone (317) 257-5767 



124 COWS & HEIFERS 

Lane Gwaltney, Windsor, Va. 

A-U-C-T-l-O-N 

MAY 3rd-FRI.-10:30 a.m. 
MILKING HERD • 100 COWS 

DHI Avg. 13,906m 4761 
h:# 24 BRED HEIFERS 

(To Begui Freshening in Aupist) 101,770 lbs. VA. MILK BASE 
ALSO SELLING - MILKING EQUIPMENT 
2-600 Gil. Mojonnier Bulk Tanks 
and Cteamery Package 
DeLaval Pipeline, 6 Milking Unite and DeUval Vacuum Pum^ 



AUCTION^ 
REALTY,." 




UOt HKRMITAGE ROAD 

RtCHMONa 



ViRGINfA 292>0 



13 FtfUtt-Uiid-riiiiliwfaf Srit 

SALEM RD.— Nice 3 bedrm. 
house on large lot, plus ad- 
joining 7'/j acres of open 
land, fine for horses. 

PILOT REALTY 
427.4000 



86 Foi Sale Viiginia Beach 

BROOKWOOD — LARGE 
FAMILY ? 4Vj bedrooms, 
2V7 baths, with large fenced 
rear yard. Call Ronnie 
Fowler, 486-4041, 486-1369. 
We trade. Higgins Realty, 
Inc. , 

FOX RUN - Spacious 3 
bedroom, 2 bath, family 
room; 1 year old. Mid 40's. 
No agents. 499 4835. 

GREENRUN 

WHYRENT? 
Pay equity and assume this 
3 bedroom townhouse. Call 
Roy Wilkes, 486 4041, or 486- 
1796: we trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc. 

iTlNG'S GRANT — VA 
BUYERS! 3 bedroofn brick 
Ranch with extras. Double 
garage. Robert Fowler, 486- 
4041, 486 1369. We trade. 
Higgins Realty Inc. 



64 Businen Equipment 



ADDRESSOGRAPH 
MULTIGRAPH MACHINE 
MODEL NO. 1700-B 

Excellent condition. Ideal for Church, 
Civic, or small organizations with 
mailings not to exceed 500 plates. 
Above also includes filing cabinet and 
drawers for mailing plates 

(INTACT MR. BROWN 

at 486-3430, wtehdiis 9 am to 5 pm 



LARKSPUR FOREST - 4 
bedroom Colonial. For 
details, call Liz Carlson, 
4864041 or 4861179. We 
trade. Higgins Realty, Inc., 
REALTOR. 

NORTH LANDING FARMS 

— Plenty of garden space 
on tieautiful '2 acre lot.. 3 
beOfjoom 2 ■ bath brick 
rihdh, priced right! Call 
Robert or Ronnie Fowler, 

486 4041 or 486 1369. We ■« 
trade. •ftt^iM Realty, Inc. 

?LANTAflON COVE 
SHORES — 4 bedrooms, 
family room, central air, 
patio, Ideal locat4en. 
$46,500. Call Chuck Jordan, 
486 4041 or 486 8191 We 
trade. Higgins Realty, Inc., 
REALTOR. 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAIA 

- 3 bedroom Ranch, family 
room with -fireplace. Pay 
equity and assume 6^1 loan 
with $110 monthly 
payments. Call Andy Wood, 
486 4041 or 340 6861. We 
trac^. Higgins Realty inc. 

WINDSOR WOODS- 

$32,950 
3 t)edroom brick ranch with 
large family room; patio 
with privacy fence and 
many extras. Call Robert or 
Ronnie Fowler, 486 4041 or 
486 13». We trade Higgins 
Rtalty, Inc. REALTOR. 

% Wanttd Real Eitate 

CASH TALKS 

We buy I. sell Need Homes • 
Call 464 6205 Crowqey 
Realty 



^^ttitfiiiA^aiiirtaMAaMAMiti 



i"* 



Real Egtate 



Tin Sin-WadiMKliy. April 17, 1974-Pigi B-9 



Financ^^usiness/Economy i 



CONSUMER! 



I" Chamber readies new 



i 



Protecting information center 
appliances 

in blacicouts 



By Peter IVeaver 



Q. Will the energy shm-tage cause a lot of blackouts 
this summer? What's the best way to protect your 
appliances in a blackout?— Mrs. S.J., Arlingtwi, Va. 

A. Because of the coal minars' strike threat, the 
conttnuiqg shortage cf imported residual oil and other 
fuel shortages, the experts say we could have a series 
of brownoute (low voltage) and even blackouts in 
certain areas of the country. 

If you are hit with a brownout or blackout, it's best to 
turn off your air conditioner. Low or wavering voltage 
can destroy an air conditioner. You can tell when 
volta^ is too low because your lights dim and the TV 
picture shrinks in it$ margin. 

In a Uackout, don't turn your air conditioner 
(electric pump motor or other electric motors) back on 
until the lights come back for three mimites or so. 
When the power returns, everyone usually has his air 
conditioner on and there's a momentary period dl low 
voltage. 

If you go away for several days, m longer, turn your 
thermostat up to 85 or so. Your air conditioning will 
work a lot less and probably won't be woricing if a 
brownout m blackout hits. 



Visitors to Virginia Beach this 
sunimerwill have information at their 
fingertips at the new Chamber of 
Commerce Tourist Information Center 
being coiKtnKted in front of the 
Virginia Bracti Civic Center, 20th 
Street and Pacific Avenue. 

Replacing the old tourist inf<n-mation 
booth, the new Tourist Center building 
will be open year-round. The 
prefabricated building will have 13 
sides of alternating glass and 
aluminum panels. The 700-square-foot 
t)uilding (viil be fully insulated and air 
conditioned with a large reception area 
to accommodate visitors. The interior 
will be paneled, and the ceiling will 
have exposed beams. 

The Center will offer infwmatiMi, 
including mote,l and campground 
vacancies, pdnts <rf interest in Virginia 



Beach, Tide^vater and the state and 
assistance in locating doctors, dentists, 
automobile repair facilities and other 
services. The building will also house a 
workroom and private office for 
Chamber of Commerce Tourism 
Director Levon Dunn. 

This is the second new builcUng the 
Chamber has constructed this year. 
Executive offices of the Chamber were 
moved in March to a new building at 
Pembroke Mall. The land for the 
Tourist Center is being made available 
free of charge from the city. 

Mayor Robert Cromwell and 
Chamber of Commerce President 
Lawrence Sancilio broke ground few the 
Tmirist Center last week. The building 
is expected to open in May, at which 
time the Chamber office at 25th Street 
and Pacific Avenue will be closed. 



Breaking ground for 
the new Chamber of 
Commerce building 
are (from left) Levon 
Dunn, «he chamber's 
tourism director. 
Mayor Robert 
Cromwell and 
chamber president 
Lawrence Sancilio. 
(Sun photo by Linda 
Miller) 



New Bayside Hospital 
names administrator 



Mind Your M 



oney 



Q. What ' does it cost to run various electric 
appliances?— T.P., New York, NY. 

A. Theannual use of electricity varies with the size of 
the appliance. Measured in kilowatt hours, an electric 
water heatra- (quick recovery) will use 4,811 kwh in a 
year, a frostless refrigerator (14 cu. ft) will use 1,829 
kwh, a coffee maker will use 106 kwh and so oa You 
multijdy these figures by the cost (rf electricity per 
kilowatt hour charged by your electric utility. The 
utility will give you the figure. 

For more kwh estimates on all sorts of appliances, 
---you can get a free booklet. "Anrnml Energy 



Requirements of Electric Household. Appliances," by 
writing: Electric Energy Association, 90 Park Ave., 
New York. N.Y. 10016. Include a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope. 



j k * <k**<k»<k* 



Q. What's the best way to save money <» prescription 
drugs?— L.J., Weston, Mass. 

^ » A. Accortfng to Sena te staffers who investigated the 
marketing of jAarmaceuticals, the best way to save 
money on prescription drugs is to use them only when 
absolutely necessary. The Senate investigators 
teamed that an estimated $7 out of every $10 spent on 
prescription drugs s unnecessary. When you talk with 
your doctor, make sure the prescription is absolutely 
necessary. Ask if you can wait a few days to see if your 
cmditicm imix-oves without the drug. 

If your doctor insists that a drug is necessary, ask f or 
a prescriiMion that gives a generic (chemical name 
instead of a specific name brand. Generic drugs are 
often much less expensive and provide the same 
results. 

Q. I'd Iflte to have a booklet or small book on crafts 
published. Doyou know a publishing companir that will 
do tWs?— Mrs. P.J., Leechburg, Pa. 
A. Ask your librarian for the "Directory of American 
Publishers." Pick out several publishers who list your 
subject as one of the things they publish. Send an 
outline <rf the bo<* <«• booklet you want to publish and 
badcground information on your qualifications. For 
^ further information, write; Association of American 
Publishers, One Paris Ave., New Ywk, NY. 10016. 

*»»AA***» 

YOUR ENERGY MONEY: Ihe most efficient 
speeds for most cars are between 35 to 55 miles per 
hour. When starting a car with an automatic 
transmission ease it up to around 20 miles per hour and 
then mwnentarily let up on the gas pedal so the 
transmission can get into high gear. If you start up 
fast, the engine stays in the lower-gas-cc«isuming gears 
until 30 miles per hour. Witii a stick shift, sliite into 
second around eight miles per hour and into high 
around 15 to 20 miles per hour. You consume mtra gas 
in the low gears and, of course, at higher speeds. 
Cruising at middle speeds saves mwiey. 



Kenneth R. Lacy, 41, has 
been named administrator 
of the new Bayside 
Hospital (formerly 
Tidewater Memorial 
Hospital) and is now 
directing the hospital's 
activities in temporary 
offices inthe Pembroke 
One Building. 

Bayside Hospital is still 
under construction at 
Witchduck Road and 
Independence Boulevard. 
It is scheduled, for opening 
in January 1975. 

Mr. Lacy said that the 
hospital name was changed 
when the company 
discovered another 
Tidewater Memorial 
Hospital in 

Rappahannock. 

HE IS a former 

administrator of Lane 
Memorial Hospital and 
Nursing Home in Zachary, 
La. He has been in hospital 
administration since 1958 
;and also has worked as a 
IkjQedical technocologist. 

He has (grated his own 
laboratory service, 
including four clinical and 
^ two iridOStrial rab-dt-atoties. 

He is a former memljer 
of the board of trustees of 
the Louisiana Services 
Administration in New 
Orleans and chairman- of 
the board of examiners iac 
the Nursing Home 
Administrators, state of 
Louisiana. 

HUMAN INC. is the new 
name for Extendicare Inc., 
the Louisville, Ky.,-based 



corporation wfWch is' 
building the new Bayside 
Hospital. 

"Too many people 
thought we were in the 
nursing home business," 
Mr. Lacy said in discussing 
the name change. 

Recently, 55 doctors arid 
dentists attended an 
organizational meeting for 
Uie new hospital. Humana 
executives addressed the 
physicians and, dentists to 
explain the hospital's 
facilities. 

Addressing the doctors 
were Bill Trivett, the 
hospital's project 
manager; Gene Burton, 
director of purchasing; 
Ron Clensy, director of 
architectural design, and 
the new administrator. 

MR.^rRfVETT^told -the 
physicians that the main 
hospital entrance will be on 
Independence Boulevard 
with two entrances leading 
to the main lobby. The 
emergency entrance will 
be on Witchduck Road. 

Bayside Hospital will be a 
full-service ' general-acute 
facility without obstetrical 
services. It will have four 
operating rooms as well as 
oral-eye and orthopedic 
surgery areas for out- 
patients. 

The hospital will have 
five floors with 61-63 
patient beds per floor. 
Each patient room will 
have vinyl walls with color- 
coordinated carpets and 
draperies»to match. Each 



room also will have a color 
television set, Mr. Burton 
said. 

THE PROFESSIONAL 
building adjacent to ttie 
hospital will also be five 
stories high. It will have 
the same glass and brick 
exterior as the hospital 
building, Mr. Clensy told 
the physicians. He also said 
«4hat a health facility with 
handball, squash and 
general athletic activities 
will be included if there is 
sufficient doctor interest. 
Future meetings are 
planned to help local 
physicians and dentists 
organize the medical- 
dental staff, Mr. Lacy said. 
All arei physicians and 
dentists will be invited to 



serve on the medical- 
dental staff, he said. 




J 



j; 1 




\ 



LACY 



SEUING...RENTING...BUYING...TRADING 

BISSEH REALTY, INC. 

"A Respected Name In Real Estate" 

Thalia Shopping Center 
4316 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 
SALES 

Mike Vance, GRI 340-7000 Lowell Powers, 420-3802' 
Rose Binett, GRI 340-9898 Lee O'Brien 340-4034 

RENTALS 

Jadi Biisett, GRI 340-5626 

OFFICE 340-9721 




HOW 
MUCH 
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COST 

PAY' 

ONE 

Bllt 

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REGENCY 



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PHONE: 42M8I3 





Tom Johnson 

COMMERCIAL 



Bob Mann 

INVESTME 



r 



I VIRGINIA BEACH 
REAL ESTATE SPECIALISTS 

H. ESTES ® 



Pimliroke courts ipariments 

MO Hvlng at compact pricis 

PEMBROKE COURTS MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
(All ulilitiM includtdl 



Ont btdroom 
2-b«droom Typ* I 
2-b«drbom Typ* II 
2-btdroom Type III 
2-lMdroomTyp*IV 

3-bMlroom 



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niPembrolw Realty locumi off indtpm 

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day 10-8, Sunday 1-6. An aictra bonui: 

^ub houM, olympic-ilia pod. 



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lEUHUM I HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 



V. 



EVERYTHING FOR YOUR HOME 



FREE ESTIMATES 

• Kitchens •Family Rooms 

•Bedrooms •Convert 

Garages 



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Added space to your home means added value to 
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convenient by «lding a room...Don't Wait...CALL NOW 



LUMBER AND HOME REMOIffiLING I -lilfj »« 
83SWLSON ROAD.CHESAPEAKE 545-4613 1 ESTlWAltS 

35 Yean of Community Service 



^-iS- - 



Q KingFealiiresSi^ndtcate. Inc., 1174. 



PwtitT Wnver welcomes qu^tions from roaders 
tor possiUe use in his column. Please send letters 
to hto in care of Virginia Beach Sun, 138 Rose- 
moat Road. Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 




Rent 
new furniture 




with purchase option 
Omiaai*a^MOomte^km^»emMa^kmt^ 
q^to hinttBe »«l yw «M ha* '•«« *f op** 
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fconti^e - • «iMlei» ftiraitBfe centef. F»e loctf 

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USE THIS HANDY UP TO DATE ALPHABETICAIi.Y USTED 
GUIDE FOR ALL YOUR SERVKZ NEEDSI 

Exterminating Plaitering Painting 




Tile 



l.ami Momr Srniie 
Bicycle Repiirs, Welding 
and Ornamental Irun Rail- 
ii^ 

VA BEACH LAWN 
MOWER & WELDING 



ROACH PROBLEM? 

Your problem Is 

our specialty! 

For expert service. 

Call 

Burton's Pest Control Co. 

497-9182 

(anytime) 



Concrete 



"Mf^m 



Old ^oi)atioi|^ 

GARDiN APARTMENTS 

New md Lovely In Pvk-LUu Sunoumiingi 
1 & 2 BEDROOMS NOW LEASING 

Beautiftil ^mckMis rooau, ftlUy 

cvpetcd, witti unple doaatt 

b^ M^ln-Utchens witii oatdite windovt 

luge rtorage un tai ewdi ^Nvtment 

iiMiividttal entmcci 

firont do« pnk^ 

ckMe to Ai9Pii4 

on IndQ>«irience ^d. on Honey Gfo? e Rd. 
Aeroat fr(»n Haygood Skof^ai Centn ta 
Bntttifvl Old DoaatiOB MuKnr 

, CM! mmii 



CONCRETE WORK 

Ratios 
driveways 

& SLABS 
CALL 

855-7111 



Electrical Contractor 




ELECTRKAL 
COtmUCTOR 
RcMmW 
CoommrW 
ladwtfW 

D.E. MitCHEkt 
426-7262 



1 



PLASTERING 
DRY WALL 

er 

Home 
Improyementi 

Call 
CUFF STOUT 
Ph. 855-5370 




PAINTING 

REPAIR 

CALL 

4271760 

FOR eiTIMATE 



TILE WORK 

ALL NEW OR OLD 
BATHS OR KITCHENS 
BIG OR SMALL 

$17 U»or 



PAINTING INTERIOR 
4EXTERI0R 

WorHdontraatodW^ - 
Fraa Etflmataa. ^ 

JC, MOODY * SONS 



6227276 



627-0044 



Wallpaparlng 



General Contractor 



■' -^^ 


Home Improimnents 






BLACK 
BROTHERS 




BnlUtn 

Home IfflproveneBt 

Coilnetors 

(kraf* Brtklers 

Boon AdttttMU 

AlvmiBim SfaUag 

Roofo • Carports 


HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

Lumber tna building materist*, 
room addilioni, »lwm ooort smJ 
winaowi, wall to wall c«fpe». 
vtr<yl sidins Fret etiimatn, 
terms 

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427-3200 


Kitt^M RcnodelUv 

CALL ANYTIME 




545-7318 

Hvgh E. Black, Sr. 
IMOPtrkAnnM 
Cli^ved»,Va. 


L.E. PIPER 

General 

Cor»tr8C»or 

Additions, repair*, 

c*ri»nfry wwk. 

Referances fumMied. 

Call43M4M. 




^ OVERALL 
DRY #ALL WORK 

Fiee Eidmates 
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MOORE'S DRY WALL 
424-2516 



Plumbing & Heating 



WALLPAPERING 

witti 8 

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Free Estimates 

No Job too Small 

^^464 6377 

^ '464 6469 -. 



LWNHAVEN 
n,UMBING 
A HEATING 

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Best Werk 

for Lett I 

Callut! 



Roofing 



PLASTCRING - 
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R^alrs & Remodeling 
& Patcttwork 

NEW & OLD WORK 

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ROOFING 

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FREEKTIMATES 

ROOFB6P*"» 

aseaviceco 
865-715S 



TeN 40,000 
People AiNwt 
Your Service. 

To placs your id in 
this diractory call 

Mrs. Ann Parker 
486-3430 



■ l| ii |iMiL|^i>-rf«j^„j*ii,^^ MmJtkfbJiM'm^s't^mMU ^^,di.».vim^^.-mj^-JKij4^u^t,mM9mm 



ftme B-10-The Sun -Wednesday, i^wil 17, 1?74 



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u 




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Because n o growth makes no sense at all. 






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*^ 




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PROFESSIONAL 

REALTY CORR 









.^ 



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^ 



*llianifal^UTw'« augtrMtM) t*MI price for modal ER8^ inclutUng mow«r. FMght, Mi-up c^irgas. atoia and locd i<D»a, il our, cm i 



OoMuH dacdar for hia prioaa anAtaJK In eHact. 
of flw GUMarat Qaetric CSoaapoBy. 



i& 



*M 



Now everyone can atfcwd the joy 

(yesr joy) en electric mowing 
and save gasoline with the new 

Dec-Tialc Rider Mower! 





f 



The Nationwide Qjnsumer Testing 
Institute supervised tests oi two 
Oec-Trak ER 8-36 pre-production 
models and validated the cutting 
range of the rider with big 36- 
inch OTowerat up to 1 '/i acre on 
a single battery charge. The pre- 
producticffi models were equipped with 
three and lour speed transmissions. 
Production models are equipped with 
a five-speed transmission. 

Although in actual usage range could 
be affected by several factors including 
grcBs moisture osntwit, terrain, tempera- 
ture and mowirig speed, experience 
on varying lowtfi and terrain diows that 
a range of up to % acre — more with 
short recharge — is no problem. 



AH the quiet, convenience, and safety benefits exdusive 
with Elec-Trok tractors are now dvoiloble to millions of 
people with smaller lawns and budgets. 

The new Elec-Trak ER 8-36 Rider Mower is, at $695, 
the lowest j»iced electric rider you can buy that we know 
of! But it offers many of the same features-found on famous 
Elec-Trak electric tractors. like — 

■ A big proven 36-inch mower that quickly, cleanly cuts 
up to 34 acrebn one battery charge! The same 



performance- proved mower you'll get wiflTthe E8M and 
ElOM model Elec-Trak tractors. 

■ A tight 24-inch turning radius for super maneuvgrability ! 

■ Five forward gears at your fingertips ! 

■ Super Safety: A seat switch that cuts power automatically 
when you leave the seat (and the power wai't go back 
on until you shift to neutral) . . . mid-mounted power pack 
for real stability! 

■ Plus all the benefits of electric tractcaing that only the 
luxury gardeners have enjoyed up to noyrl 

ELEC-TBAXTRACrOBSDOlflHEED ABHOPOTGAS 

No fuel shortage here. Plus efficient electric power is one 
of the major answers to energy conservation. 
Elec-Trak tractors ore up to Ifve times more efficient per 
unit of fuel than gas-powered equipanent. Whwi lediarged 
at night (off peak load period) they actually help to 
balance power generation loading. Forget gasoline costs., 
worries about supply— your electric outlet is your own 
home fuel station. 





You'll finish mowing quicker because the 
nimble Elec-Trak Rider Mower's tight 24-inch 
turning radius means fewer trips arc^d M 
trees, hedges, flowers. 



m^^m 



"«i.'u.'v-M^:!Siii«i *SBBa 



These are the"' jcmi'' of ekctric 

mowing that make Ekc-Tiaic iradors 

the teal value in vaffd equipment. 



QUIET 

It's like a ride in the country — cool, 

dean, so quiet you can listen to 

the ball game on the radio or just 

listen to the birds. You'll be able to 

mow in the early morning or late 

evening without disturbing the 

neighborhood, and embarrassing 

yoursell. {E14 model shown.) 





EASYTOBim 

Turn the switch . . . it's on and away you 
go. Simi:^ controls guide you on your 
quiet, clean, odorless, vibrationless ride. 
Easy to get on and off. Easy to stay on 
because it's vibrati<MileBS, quiet, and 
fumeless. (ER8-36 Rider Mower shown.) 




EASYTOBCAINTAIN 

Your "fuel" is any handy wall 
outlet; charger is built-in. No 
gas cons, hot engine, polluting 
exhaust. 

No spark fdugs, filters, or oil 
to change. No carburetors, 
mufflers, tune-ups. No engine to 
mess with, just reliable electric 
power from direct motor drives. 



Tft' 



POWEBFDL 

Depending cxi tractor size and 

"capacity, you can cut big 

country lawns, plow deep 

, snow with attachments, haul 

heavy loads wife the cart. In 

fact, many Elec-Trak ^rtps 

ore in rigorous commercial 

service for airlines, f actori^, 

and notional parks. 

(E20 model shown.) 





SAFER 

Everyone can operate 
Elec-Trak tractors safely. 
An exchsive seat switch 
turns the power off the 
instant you leave the 
seat. Mower blades stop 
in less than three seconds! 
The tractor and mowor 
won't start again till you 
want them to. 
(E12M model shown.) 



EC(H40MICAL 

On the average, it costs about 5C an 

acre to mow with an Elec-Trak tractor 

versus about 40C or more an acre for 

gas px3wer. Save on maintenance-— 

no plugs, points, filters. Ask your 

dealer for the facts and figures. 




m^ 



wmmi 



mtmmm 



It's easy to see 
howilwoifcs 
so hard. 



AUTOMATIC CHARGER 

It's built right into the tractor. 
The automatic charger plugs 
into any grounded household 
outlet, converts 110-120 AC 
power to 36-volt DC to re&U 
the power pack. Plug in 
whenever you're not using it, 
check the water level onoe 
a month, and your Elec-Trak 
tractor is always ready to go. 



POWER TAKE-OFF 
OUTLE T 



All pow« lor attachments 
(mower, snowthrower, etc.) 
comes directly from the 
power pack. It riuis through 
this power take-oii outlet 
(PTO) and into the attach- 
ment's own drive motor. 
This means full attachment 
power regardless oJ tractor 
speed, no hookup of co>P- 
plicated belts, pulleys ^ 
and shafts. 




POWER PACK 

The heart oi the Elec-Trak tractor is the battery 
power pack. Elec-Trak tractors carry irom three 
to six power pack units. And qllixitteries are 
guaranteed ! Elec-Trdk tractor power packs ore 
built to be tough like the industrial batteries that 
roll up to 1 ,200 hours before losing ahy read 
storage capdcity. Ordinary cor batteries wouldn't 
provide full power for 10 % of the life of an 
Elec-Trak tractor power pack. 



\ ACCESSORY OUTLET 

This second outlet is your 
36-volt power for all ac- 
cessories (hedge triittmer, 
^ chain saw and edger/ 
trimmer) and turns your 
tractor into a mobile 
power source. 



DISC BRAKE 

The large disc brake is mounted 
on the tronscode to multiply brak- 
ing power for sure, qi»»ck stopsf 



(E20 model shown) 



Charge! 



ff 



All you do is plug in your Elec 
Complete recharge overnight 



;DRIVE MOTOR 

"Hie drive Tnotor, 
fully enclosed to 

lAXLE fH-otect it from dirt 

The rugged, cast- and moisture, 

iroQ steel geared transfers smooth, 

tronsaxle provides high torque power 
several speed/ through the trans- 

torque ranges to axle to rear wheels, 

maximize per- 
formance over the 
wide range of 
Elec-Trak tractor 
applications. 

■Trak trcKrtor . . . and the built-in charger goes to 
or a 25 % power boost during your lunch hour. 



WARRANTY SUMMARY (for residential 
use) In addition to a one year warranty 
against defects on all tractor parts, the 
Elec-Trak tractor features a five-year 
battery warranty (three years ER8-36 
and E8M/E8HM). The battery is war- 
ranted against defects for the first two 
years, with a pro rata charge during tha 
last three years on models El DM, El 4/' 
E16, and E20. The ER8-36, E8M/E8HM 
batteries are warranted against defects 
^OT the ^irstyecffy^dfith a pro-rata (diarge 
during the next two years. See appli- 
cable Owner's Use and Care Manual 
for complete warranty statement 



Electric mower pxjwer is different from gas power; 
rather than stall, it rises to the diallfflige. The 
torque (applied force) increases automatically 
with the load applied to it. * 

The stall torque of an electric motor is far superior 
to that of a gas engine, with peak output up to 
10 times continuous rated capacity. That's one of 
,the reasons that all modem locomotives are either" 
all electric or convert diesel power to electric 
for driving their rows of powerful wheels. 



work. 



I 




2 



Just plug the Elec-Trak tractonnto an 
outlet when you're not using the 
trcrclor. Dcai'1 worry^it can't overcharge. 
You get full power overnight, 25 % 
power in one hour, 85% 
power in five hours. 



No fuel shortage problems here, the fill- 
ing station for an Elec-Trak tractor is the 
nearest standard 1 lO-volt wall outlet 





You're ready to go anytime. And even 
if you run it way down, you're not 
stranded. Just let th? Elec-Trak tractor 
rest for a few minutes, and the power 
pack will recover enough to get yew 
back to the plug. With an Dec-Trak 
tractor you should never run out of fuel. 



•'» 




Mowfilceapro! 

There's an Elec-Trok tractor with the range, mower anddischarge 

system to fit your needs perfectly. See chart at lower left lor 

combinations available — ask your Elec-Trak tractor dealer to 

help you determine what's just right for you. 



REAR DISCHARGE OR SIDE 

Here the optional electric powered 

sweeper picks up clippings from 

a rear discharge model. You can 

mow and sweep in one pass. 

Great for fall leaf cleanup. With 

straight-through-design .there's no 

clogging in long chutes. (E12M 

model tractdr, AH42 mower shown.) 



CUTTING CORNERS MADE EASY 

Mid-mounted mower models offer tight cutting radius, easy 
maneuverabihty, rieed less storage space, with mowers 
that "float" to reduce scalping. The popular front-mounted 
models have a patented swivel-joint suspension designed 
for full "float" over uneven lawns (pictured is an E20 model 
with ground following front mounted mower). Full mowef 
visibility gives you full swath cutting, close trimming on 
both sides and front. 





FUP-UP CLEAN-UP 

The front-mounted mower has a handy 
feature — unplug the PTO cord and you 
can easily flip up the mower for 
cleaning. You can even sharpen the 
blades right on the tractor in the field. 
To remove this mower, 
j ust pull a few pins, disccmnect 
the power (dug, and drive the Elec-Trak 
. tractor away from ttie mower. No lifting^ 
or pulling. (EU model tractor, AA42 
mower shown.) 



NATIONWIDE CONSUMER TESTING INSTITUTE 
VALIDATED MOWING RANGE 

There's an Elec-Trak tractor that will mow your-lawn 
on one charge. And to prove it, an independent 
laboratory supervised actual mowing tests for the 
range of pre-production new Elec-Trak Rider Mowers 
and the middie-of-the-line E14 Elec-Trak tractor. The 
results of this range test were more than 1 V4 acres 
mowed by the two Oec-Trak Rider Mowers equipped 
with three and four speed transmissions (current 
models incorporate a five-speed Iransmissionj 
and more than 2^/4 acres by the two E14 
Elec-Trak tractors equipped with 42" 
front mowers. The Nationwide Consum- 
er Testing Institute report on this test _ 
is crvailqble on request. 




Up to 3/4 acre (about 100'x325') 
Model: ER 8-36 Rider Mower or E8M 



Up to 2-2y4 aaes (about 2M'x350') 
Model: E8HM 



Up to 2>fi acres (about 27(rx400') 
Models: ElOM (Heavy Duty option), 
E12M (Standard) 



MOOEL 


BOTARY 
NOWBI 


NOWEB 
DISCHAIOE 


4IINCU 
8ICEUBAB 


GAMG 


ER 8-36 Rider 


361a. Mid 


• Side 


— 


— 


E8M 


Kin. Mid 


Side 


• ^A 


— 


Heavy Duty E8HM 


36 in. Mid 


Side. 


— 


— 


ElOM 


36 in. Mid 


Side 


— 


Rear 


E12M 


42 in. Hid 


SlJe or Rear 


— _ 


Rear 


EM 


42 in. Front 


Side or Rear 


K» 


Front or Roar 


E16 


42 in. front 


J^MeorReor 


*» 


Front or Rear 


E20 


42 in. Front 


Side or Rear 


f 


Front or Rear 




^G^ 



Up to 2%-3>A <Ka-es (about 300'x400'-325'x435') 
Models: E12M (Heavy Duly option), E14, E16, E20 



«? 



Up to 41/2-5 acres (about 4(M'x490*-435'jt500') 
Models: E12M (Heavy Duty option with add^n Booster 
Pack),E14,Ei6 or E2D (when eadi is equii^wd with odd'^m 
^volt poww Bolster Pack— See APe4 on page 6) 



Ok 



mmi 



I I w i W,-...JlUJU4 '! --i- ' %.lU4^JIIU4,JB^ WWMWWWiiipW«lPil 



Elec-Tiak tiadors foyfully cut, cH|i^ haul, 
hiich, pbw, and sweep wmi a powe^^ 



. •". n Us 




^•»MaW--r 



-r-m:mBM-m.jmmm 



£lec-Trak tractors ccm pull and push a variety oi attachments . . . and , 
Elec-Tiok tractors'ore portable power centers that ccm go anywlwre. 
Power hand tools sim|;dy, {dug into the Elec -Trak tractor's pow«- 
outlets. Here are just some of the more than 40 attachments and . 
accessori^ available from your Elec -Trak tractor dealer. 



ATTACHMENTS Affl) ACCESSORIES SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR DELEHON WHUOUT NOTICE 



""' I MiP' 






-^ 



f*» 



^- -.; t 


^^Mn 


mmmm 









.^^*s 



Pick the Elec-Tialc model that fits your needs best*. 

Starting at $695* 



NEV^ER8-36 

• 8 horsepower class • Balanced design- 
batteries between the wheels ior real sta- 
bility — Super comlort. excellent foot room, 
complete visibility • Ground-following 36 
inch cut mower • Very tight turning capa- 
bility, 24 inch cutting radius • Seat switch 
and return to neutral safety interlocks • 
Feather-touch steering with rugged steel 
segment and pinion gear • 5 forward 
speeds. 1 reverse * Deep dish 13 inch 
steering wheel * Disc loot and parking 
brake • Built-in charger • MODEL AND 
SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITH- 
OUT NOTICE 



E8M 

• 8 horsefiower class • Built-in Elec-Trak 
tractor safety seat switch • Quick-stop 
mower blades • 3 torque ranges forward, 
1 reverse ■ Mounts a big 36 inch beltless 
mower • Tight turning and cutting radius 

• High-torque pfermanent drive motor • 
Large rear storage area/weight box • 
Simple, feather-touch clutch control and 
brake in one pedal • Dependable disc 
brake • One piece welded-unitized body 
frame • Fast acting lever lift for attach- 
ments * Mounts 42 inch snow /dozer blade 

• MODEL AND SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO 
CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



HEAVY-DUTY E8HM 

• Same features as the ESM^but with 3 
more batteries in rear storage area to give 
heavy-duty service • While E8M will mow 
up to % acre, the heavy-duty E8HM will 
mow up to 2 acres • MODEL AND SPECIFI- 
CATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT 
"NOTICE 





ElOM 

• 10 horsepower class • Standard "big 
tractor" 36-volt Elec-Trak tractor 4X)wer 
pack (six 6- volt Elec-Trak tractor batteries) 
and recharger • Optional heavy-duty 
power pack • 3 speed torque range's lot- 
ward, 1 reverse • Simple, featKer-touch 
clutch control and brqke on one pedal • 
Fuel level gauge • Built-in Elec-Trak trac- 
tor safety seat switch • Quick-stop mower 
blades • Dependable xiisc brake • Fast 
acting lever lilt for' attachments • Electric 
outlet for plug-in hand tools • Mounts 
38 inch snow thrower or 42'inch snow dozer 
blade • MODEL AND SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT 
TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 




E12M 

• 12 horsepower class • 3 forward speeds, 
2 reverse in each of 3 gear ranges (9 
speeds forward) • Mid-mount mower for 
tig^er cutting Mdius * High back foam 
seat • Electric accessory and PTO outlets, 
headlights and dashlight • Quick acting 
lever lift • Single lever speed control puts 
forward and reverse at your fingertips • 
Hill-climbing startup control with power 
pulse button for rapid pickup • Built-in 
Elec-Trak tractor safety seat switch) PTO 
interlock and quick-stop mower blades • 
Mounts 38 inch snow thrower or 48 inch 
snow dozer blade • MODEL AND SPECIFICA- 
TIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUt NOTICE 



NEW £14 



• 14 horsepower class • 3 forward speeds, 
2 reverse in each of 4 gear ranges (12 
speeds forward) • Hill-climbing startup 
control with power pulse button for rapid 
pickup • Electric front lift • High back foam 
seat • Electric accessory and PTO outlets, 
headlights and dashlight • Single lever 
speed control puts forward and reverse at 
your Kngertips • Built-in Elec-Trak tractor 
safety seat switch, PTO interlock and 
quick-stop mower blades • Mounts 38 inch 
snow thrower, 48 inch dozer blade or 30 
inch rear tiller • MODEL AND SPECIFICA- 
TIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITflOUT NOTICE 



NEWE16 

• 16 horsepower class • 7 forward speeds, 
3 reverse in each of 4 gear ranges {2B 
speeds forward) • Electric front lift • 
Molded cushion foam setat • Electric ac- 
cessory and PTO outlets, headlights and 
dashhght • Single lever speed control puts 
forward, re^rse at your fingertips • Hill- 
climbing startup control with power pulse 
button for rapid pickup • Built-in Elec-Trak 
tractor safety seat switch, PTO interlock 
and quick-stop mower blades • Mounts 
38 inch snow thrower, 48 inch dozer blade 
or 30 inch rear tiller • MODEL AND SPECIFI- 
CATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT 
NOTICE 




• 18 horsepower class • 7 forward speeds, 
3 reverse in each of 4 ranges (28 speeds 
forward) • Foot pedal speed control with 
forward/reverse switch • 2-speed push 
button cruise control for constant speed 
work • Electric front lilt • Hill-climbing 
startup control with power pulse button for 
rapid pickup • Super foam bucket seat 

• Electric accessory and PTO outlets, head- 
lights and dashlight • Built-in Elec-Trak 
tractw safety seat switch, PTO interlock 
and quick-stop mower blades • Mounts 
38 inch snow thrower, 48 inch dozer blade 
or 30 inch rear tiller . MODEL AND SPECIFI- 
CATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT 
NOTICE 



•Manufacturer's suggested retail price lor model ER8-36 including mower. Freight, set-up charges, state and local taxes, if any, are additional. Consult dealer lor his prices and terms in ellect. 

i^Nir nearest dedkr b Hsied ImImt OT 



Advertising Supplement to 
Virginia Beach Sim 

Virginia (224) 

PORTSMOUTH 

Tidewater Feed and Seed Co. 
3400 George Washington Highway 
(804)399-7561 



^JE^^« 



PMi^d m VSA. 



r> . 



'* C> - 



OP-74-Mn' 



i^mmttm 



mmmmmmmmmm 



wmm 



fl^WIIP!W!W 



»»» **** w-l 



IBRIAU SfiCfiOM 
PA STATE I.I8RART 
ilCHIIQNO U 23219 



Wliere Tfc* 
itetion Is/ 

Sun Clatitfie^ 

Fori^MontoFenonSw. 
vice. CALL «6-3433, 



486-8434. 



49th Year Nd. 17 



Circulation 20,750 





G\V^^'^ 



I 



25 



\8"1^ 



^aa&.^ 



WOIMfBLEl 

WEAUrV J 



IB 497 3524 



Wednmday, April 24, 1974 



City of Virginia Beach. 



.t^ 



'T^Qi^Spy 



rap-^* 



pyrlgnt 1974 
B««ch Publls«ilng Corp. 



15 Cents 



!/ 



SUNBEAMS 



"I enjoy The Sun. I read it from the front 
page through the want ads." - J.M., Lynn- 
haven 

"The Sun is my only source of Virginia 
Beach news. Now I finally know what's hap- 
pening in my city." - B.R., Bayside 

"At last, a newspaper that cares about Vir- 
^nia Beach. The Sun rounds out my reading. 
-J.R., Kempsville 

For home, delivery phone 486-3430 



Kempsville 
female nets 
tennis wins 

— Page A-7 



Aqtress has 
formula^ 



filling hours 

—Pago B-1 

REALTORS throughout the country i»re 
observing Realtor Week, which ends 
Saturday. A four-page real estate section 
salutes the week and looks at events 
planned by local realty boards in 
conjunction with their week . . . Pages B-3 
through B-6. 

SPOOKY suspense is on stage this 
weekend and next as the Little Theatre of 
Virginia Beach continues "Wait Until 
Dark." A review is on Page B-1. 

"WEST SIDE STORY" will be prfesented 
by the Qox High School music and drama 
departments Thursday through Saturday. 
Tickets for the musical are $1.50 in advance 
or $2 at the door. Reservations may be 
made by calling the high schod. Curtain 
time is 8 p.m. 

Inside 

aassified B-9 

Comment '.. A-2 

Features •.A-4 

Forum A-2 

Gardening A-5 

Lifestyles B-1 to B-2 

Real Estate » B-3 to B-6 

Religion .A-6 

Sports A-7 to A-9 



Bribery charges investigated 
in sewer installation projects 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

Virginia Beach City employes — particularly 
those in the Community Services Department — 
are surrounded by investigations. 

The FBI is investigaUng possible bribery in 
connection with the installation d Beach sewer 
projects. James J. O'Connor of the NorfdUi FBI 
office confirmed last week that the FBI is 
checking out complaints concerning the sewer 
projects, though he declined to say who had filed 
the complaints. 

Community Services Director*W.W. Fleming 

also came under fire Monday concerning a 
pc^sible conflict of interest and violation of the 
city code of ethics in connection with a private 
business venture. . 

A CITY source said the FBI sewer project 
investigations may have stemmed "from 
contractors reporting to the FBI that they had 
been pressured, saying if you want this 
(installation) contract, you'll have to give me 
some money." 



. The FBI entered the case^nder the Hobbs Act. 
a brand federal act which covers cases dealing 
with interstate commer(ffe. The sewer contract 
bids may have come from out-of-state 
ecmtractors. Or, materials used in sewer 
installation may have travelled to the Beach 
from out of state. In either case, the FBI \s 
empowered to investigate under the Hobbs Act. 
(Some persons have sug^sted that the use of 
federal revenue sharing funds could also justify 
federal investigation, but the FBI declined to 
comment. ) 

The city has prepared a statement which says 
it is aware of the investigation and is cooperating 
with the FBI. 

Mayor Robert Cromwell said Monday that the 
probe "appears to be a localized matter" ain 
shouU not reflect on all city employes. 
"Indications are that if there is any wrong-doing, 
it is in the utilities department," the mayor said. 

THE UTILITIES DEPARTMENT is a division 
of the Community Services Department. Though 
neither the city nor the FBI will comment, it is 



suspected that city sewer impectors may be 
involved. 

City Manager Roger Scott was instructed by 
the City Council Monday to make his own 
investigation into the matter and to suggest what 
should be done within the city administration. 

Should the FBI find any of the complaints 
valid, indictments would come from the U.S. 
District Attorney's office in Norfolk. 

If the FBI find it has no jurisdiction in Uie 
matter, the investigation will be turned over to 
local authorities. 



Mr. Talbot's firm. 

City Manager Roger Scott and Mr. Fleming 
are to meet ttiis week to discuss the allegations 
and details of Mr. Fleming's association with 
Mr. Talbot. Mr. Scott is scheduled to report back 
to the Council Monday, (In theory, the Council 
has no authority in personnel matters. They 
appoint the city manager and he hires or fires his 
staff. The Council may, hflSKcver, make 
recommendations to Mr. Scott and Mr. Fleming 
may be subject to dismissal or be asked to 
dissolve his parttiership with Mr. Talbot should 
there be a conflict. 



SEVERAL QUESTIONS also have arisen this 
week concerning a land purchase by Community 
Services Director WW. Fleming. Mr. Fleming is 
part owner of a land parcel in Chesapeake with 
Douglas Talbot, a member of Talbot, Wermers 
and Associates, a local engineering firm which 
frequently does business in Virginia Beach. His . . , 

association with Mr. Talbot may conflict with his * "Doug Talbot is an individual," Mr. Fleming 
position as director of Community Services since said. "He is a primary director of an engineering 
his department reviews and approves or firm, but there is no relation in the two, and I 
disapproves city site plans, including those fra- have no connection with the firm," 



Mr. Felming says there is no conflict of 
interest. He says he agreed to purchased the land 
with Mr, Talbot in December 1972 or January 
1973, a time when he was not employed by the 
City of Virginia Beach, 










STANDING 



MACDONALD 



JOY 



MALBON 



OBEIWDORF 



BOLIN 



CROMWELL 







LYNK 



sliini 



SPARROW 



MULDEZ 



MGCLANAN 





• • 



UTILE 



Countdown to Council 



13 candidates rate priorities 



Bv LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

A poll of candidates running for two-at- 
large seats on the Virginia Beach City Council 
in the May 7 election shows that nine of the 13 
hopefuls list water and sewer installation in 
the city as one of their top priorities if elected. 
Passage of a controlled growth plan and 
improved education rank next among the 
candidates' concerns. 

The field of 14 candidates who originally 
filed for the at-large race has been narrowed 
by one. John Atkinson recently dropped out of 
contention saying unforseen business com- 
mitments prevented him from devoting the 
time necessary to campaign. 

Eleven challengers now remain, trying to 
unseat incumbents Mayor Robert Cromwell 
and Councilman Murray Malbon. Those 
eleven include Sandy Bolin, Peter Joy. 
Drewry Little. Edward Lynk, Cecily Mac- 
donald, Reba McClanan, Philip Muldez, 
Meyera Oberndorf, Joel Smith, Robert 
Sparrow and Patrick Standing. All voters are 
eligible to vote for two persons in the at-large 
race. 



Series 

This final article of a two-part series by Sun 
Staff Writer l.inda Miller examines the programs and 
platforms of the IS candidates for two at-large seats 
on the Virginia Beach City Council. / 



EXTENSION OK water and sewer lines into 
older neighborhoods should be placed ahead 
of services for newer developments say 
candidates Edward Lynk, Cecily Macdonald, 
Philip Muldez and Sandy Bolin. 

Candidate Meyera Oberndorf agrees that 
water and sewer services, like schools and 
roads, must be improved to meet the demands 
of the city's growth. She would propose the 
city select one priority each year (such as 
water and sewer installation) and budget the 
necessary funds to bring those services up to 
par throughout the city while not neglecting 
other city necessities. 

"If the city purchases Princess Anne and 
Aragona Utilities, its going to be a lot easier 
for persons in older areas to hook up to water 
and sewer lines," says Joel Smith. He 
proposes the city acquire all private utility 
companies in the city by selling revenue 
prochicing bonds. 



Reba McClanan says the city can go beyond 
its bonding limit to expand services if it can 
prove the water and sewer bonds would be 
self-financing. She believes that can be done 
and/ says older neighborhoods and new 
developments could get services at the same 
time. 

MAYOR ROBERT CROMWELL and his 

running mate Councilman Murray Malbon 
also believe services can be extended to both 
old and new areas at the same time under the 
city's bonding limit increase passed by the 
1974 Virginia General Assembly, (Under the 
new bonding guidelines, the city can borrow 
about $14 million without voter approval,) 

Many of the candidates list adoption of a 
workable land use plan for future growth as 
one of their firet priorities, 

Peter Joy says he would call for a six-month 
moratorium on construction in the city until a 
well-developed comprehensive growth plan 
could be established. He says the recent "plan 
for planning" developed by the city's planning 
department is a step in the right direction, but 
future development should be outlined in u 
chronological manner, • 

(See COUNTDOWN, page A-10) 



zone 
maps 

ready 



Maps showing the new school 
boundary zones are now 
available lA all the city public 
schools. The maps were 
delivered to each of the 49 
public schools last week. 

School zone boundaries were 
re-drawn in February to relieve 
overcrowding al some schools 
and to funnel students into the 
three new junior high schools 
scheduled to open this fall. 

The boundaries are drawn 
onto three sets of city planning 
department street and vicinity 
guides of Virginia Beach, One 
set shows boundaries for 
elementary schools, one for 
junior high schools and one for 
high schools. The maps are 49 
inches by 36 inches, 

IN .ADDITION, booklets 
describing the new school zone 
boundaries have been available 
at the 8ch(x)ls for some time. 
The booklets are also broken 
down into high school, junior 
high school and elementary 
school attendance. 

The booklets attempt to show 
where students in certain areas 
of the city will attend school in 
the fall. However, the booklets 
are not a complete guide, said 
Martin Mulderrig. coordinaior 
of pupil personnel for (he city 
schools. 

"We just can'l list 
everything," Mr. Mulderrig 
said "There are so many 
different subdivisions and some 
are not always known by the 
same name." 



#^ 



TEACHER TURNOVER 



Is salary the mason? 



By DONNA IIENDRKK 
Sun Staff Writer 

• A, 

Are teachers leaving the Virginia Beach school 
system because of low pay? . 

Apparently not, says E, Bruce McGuire, the 
schools' assistant superintendent of personnel. 

Indeed they are, claims Richard Gordon, 
executive director of the Virginia Beach Education 
Association (VBEA). 

Mr, McGuire presented statistics at last week's 
Virginia Beach School Board meeting on 
resignations of instructional personnel. His figiffes 
seem to show that "salary scale is not a major 
factor in the teacher turnover rate," he told the 
board 

But Mr, Gordon claims that the school system is 
playing a "numbers game, " and statistics to be 
compiled this spring by the education association 
will show that an "iiadequate salary sctedule does 
force good teachers «it of teaching, ' he said. 

THE VBEA wiir survey every teacher in the 
school system. Mr. Gordon said, aW once the 
survey results are compiled, "Our view is going to 
differ substantially." 



THE ISSUE OF inadequate pay forcing teachers 
to leave the^hool system has been one of the points 
in the VBEA's recent campaign to raise teachers' 
salaries. 

The VBEA reiterated the point in announcing the 
teachers' recent phone campaign, in various ad- 
vertisements run during that campaign and in a 
p<»ition statement presented to the City CouiKil 
April 1 by Mr. Gondon, 

THE STTATISTICS Mr. McGuire presented to the 
School Board detail ihe number ot instructional 
personnel who have left the local school system. 
The reasons for I^tving are divided into 14 
categories. 

None of the categories is low or inadequate 
salary, but at least three of the categories cwild 
sh<m' "dissatisfaction" with the local school 
system. Mr. McGuire tn'd the board. 

Those categories are "left to join another 
Virginia public school system." "to teach 
elsewhere, not in Virginia pjblic schools" and "to 
enter non-teaching field " 

MR. Ml(;UIRK*S office compiled statisUes for 
(See TEACHERS, page AlO)y 




Closed 
council 

The Virginia Beach (Uy 
( ouncil met .Mwiday fer 25 
itiiiwles in eldsed session, 
op^n to nrilher (he public 
nor the press. The agenda 
listed a "personnel" 
mailer, "appoiwmente ts 
commissions" and a 
"legal" matter l«r 
discussion, in l.i meetings 
so far «h» year, the t'ouncll 
tas met fw seven hoars 
and %t minutes behind 
closed Amws. 



v:^ 



Church'^s 
business 
can wait ^ 

"Time's a wastin'," cried 
the Hev. S.D. Heller when 
one of htft congregation 
spread the news that (he 
iroul were hiling at Kudee 
Inlel. orr he went, (ie and 
all. leaving his work al (he 
First .\ssemWy of <iod to 
casi oHi a llne.'Mhile Ihe 
casUng was still good. 
(Kun phtrto bv Hod Mann) 




%s 



■^■^di^^^fti^ta&^^^^^^MA^hlAllAl 



lAHHil 



A, 



Comment 



Paga A-2-Tht &n-W*dn«d8y, April 24. 1974 



An editorial: 



Housing blight 



No toilet facilities, a leaky roof or 
poor insulatim — the problems of 
substandard housing — only bother 
persons who have to live in the 
substandard conditi(X}s. 

Virginia Beach has l(Hig been 
billed as an elite resort city, but 
never did anybody say that same 
city couldn't have ghetto areas. The 
(x-oblem of substandard housing is 
most often overlooked, as are the 
needs of those persons residing in 
poor housing in what has been 
termed "an emerging city." 

Well, it's time that somecme 
"emerge" to help eliminate the pow 
housing in the city before it's too 
late. The City of Virginia Beach has 
"pockets" of substandard housing. 
It's not a major urban blight 
problem — yet. And, why should 
everyone stand by and let it become 
one. 

PRESENTLY, the inspection «of 
housii^ is done by the Public Health 
Department. City Manager Roger 
.Scott has proposed in his 1974-75 
'budget that the minimum housing 
-inspections division be placed under 
the city administration rather than 
remaining under joint city-state 
operation in the Health Department. 



Mr. Scott has budg^ed funds for a 
superintendent of housing, three 
inspectors and a clo'k-typist. The 
Health Department, which has 
never been adequately staffed to 
deal with the housing problem, also 
has three housii^ inspecting. 

But the biggest prc^lem is finding 
standard housing where persons 
living in homes that sh<mld be 
condemned and perhaps destroyed 
can relocate. The city locdcs to 
private industry or charitable 
(M^anizations to provide the needed 
low-moderate income housing. Ttie 
private building iiKlustry says it 
needs a subsidy program to 
construct homes for lower income 
families, and they lode to the federal 
government for help. The federal 
government froze housing funds last 
year and has yet to offer cities a 
viable alternative. 

Perhaps the Beach should stop 
and examine what other cities have 
done, good and bad, in dealing with 
housing problems. It's time for 
everyone to siap passing the buck 
before this "emerging city" 
becomes "submerged" in a housing 
blight like that with which other 
cities, among them Norfolk, is now 
having to deal. 





Cityside 

ByUndalMHer 

Loose moose or 

\ 

a Moose lodge 



It's all a question of whether you'd rather have 
live moose or human moose in Virginia Beach. 

Some time ago, attorney Grover '^ Wright 
presented an ai^Hcation by the Fraternal Order rf 
the Moose to construct a lodge on property zoned 
agricultural. He was told that was not allowed un- 
der the ComjH'ehensive Zoning Ordinance (CZO). 

In an investigation <tf the matter, Mr. Wright 
discovered the ordinance allowed live moose in an 
agricultural district. It seems a person could build 
a lodge for moose, but the Beach Moose couldn't 
build a lodge. 

The ordinance was amended Monday to allow 
lodges for fraternal orgaiusations to be built in the 
agricultural districts under conditional uses and 
structures. 



Forum 




Litter hitter 



Sir: 



tetters from 
our readers 



*** <>*» * *» 



THE VIRGINIA BEACH SPCA got an animal 
(Htliiiance this week that will give them greater 
control over loose and unvaccinated pets in the city, 
as well as providing protection for the animals! 

Though many of the restriction on cats were 
dropped from an origninal draft of the ordinance, 
the new law was still unpopular with one cat lover 
and one councilman. It requres that cats, like dogs, 
be confined and not allowed to run loose. One cat 
owner complained it was impossible to keep a cat 
confined. 

Councilman George PerreU, who owns a farm, 
told the Council the farmer needed to let the cats 
run loose. "If you can't let the cats out, then you're 
going to have to license the rats," he said. 



"FLYTTA EDERT BOLAG TILL ett annat 
. Land." The sentence looks like a big typ(^raphical 
error, but it's Swedish for "move your business to 

- another country." 

The idea is the city's latest advertising gimmick 
: to attract new business and industry to Virginia 
• Beach. The Beach is billed as having the diversity 
'■ of a small country. 
' The city ads, in variais media, always begin wjth 

- a quote in a foreign language and end with "^^eh i t 
'- come& to business, we're * different country." 

! On the tourist sicte of the city's advertising 
> biMlget, the Beach is billed as "a real vacation". 
■ Ads in many nationally circulated magazines and 
' newspapers tell the prospective tourist that "a real 
vacation" begins with things li^e the sand, the surf 

- and the sun. 



Insured arts 



Sir: 

I am writing in reference to your article "Arts 
groups sigh relief after insurance nux-up" (The 
Sun, April 17), regarding the Virginia Beach School 
Board pronouncement of the $1 million liability 
insurance requirement for all non-school functions. 

This was no "tempest in a teapot." Indeed, it was 
no misunderstanding. It was an official 
pronouncement from the School Board, and I am 
most happy that the Board has rescinded it. It was 
officially in print and into the schools. The fact that 
the School Board has changed it is a credit to the 
School Board. By no streteh of the imagination was 
it a simple, misunderstandit^. 

Milton A. Saunders Jr. 
President, Virginia Beach Civic Symphony 

(Editor's note: The School Board, at its meeting Nov. 
20, 1973, took action providing liability insurance for ail 
persons attending or participating in functions by non-school 
groups approved to be held on school property. A memo to 
tdl school principals, dated Dec. 10, 1973, from H.S. Aber- 
nathy. assistant superintendent, business affairs, and James 
C Spencer, coordinator, non-school use of school facilities, 
states, "effective immediately, all parties, both individuals 
end groups, except Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and PTAs are 
required to submit evidence that liability insurance coverage 
of at least $1 million is in effect for the activity listed on 
lft« '4§plication for Use of Sthool Facility'," That memo 
has since been superseded within the past three weeks, Mr. 
Spencer said last week, by a new memo to all principals set- 
ting $100,000-$ 300,000 personal ir^ury coverage for the 
above groups. Mr. Spencer said it is required only if the 
pvups charge admission to their functitms.) 



Power pla 

Sir: 






s 




yvn 

Am Ind^fmdent New^Mper 



DAVID R DEAN 



STAN MARTIN 



HEAL BBITTON SIMS 

lUn^ii^ Editor 



SfMDRA U.A OLOAKER 



MMCS C. KNOWN 



M^Uonaik* 



KACN rMUSHING COflKWATIOH 

tai 






When Reid Ervin finst became a manber of the 
Virginia Beach City Council almost four years age 
it seen^ to me that he was much more interested 
in taking over the actions of the Council than 
working with the other members (rf the Coiuicil for 
better government for Virginia Beach. 

As a power base for this take-over, he tried to 
reorganize the Jack Etheridge machine Ixit was 
unsuccessful. It then appeared that he looked 
toward some members of the Kellam Organization 
but with no siKcess. 

Failing in these attempts, he became a Iwier and 
started acting like a spanked child, voting with the 
min<N*ity on most d the busines coming bef(x-e 
Council. 

At long last it ai^iears he has found an 
organization he can cwitrol— the Virginia Beach 
Forum. One has to attend only one or two cf The 
Forum's meetings to realize that Mr. Ervin owns it 
body and soul. If Mr. Ervin is re-elected, it is my 
c^nion we will have a political machine ha-e in 
Virginia Beach that will make ai^ttur^ else we 
have had lock like a ^nday school picnic. I (k>n't 
think we want that kind of government. 



I would like to compliment your newspaper for 
the informative article on the recently passed 
amendment establishing a minimum fine of $50.00 
for littering in the City of Vii^inia Beach. With the 
passage of this amendment and strong enforcement 
by the Police Department and court, it is hoped that 
Virginia Beach will be a beautiful and clean city in 
which to live and fOr our visitors to enjoy. 

Garden clubs in Virginia Beach have spent a 
great deal of time and money in brautification 
projects along the roadways. Just recently in 
Kempsville, three miles of median strips were 
planted with contributions from the community. It 
is indeed disheartening to see beer cans, pop bottles , 
and a variety of trash accumulate around these 
plantings. .^ 

It should be noted that the strengthening of the 
litter law was due to the diligent efforts of Kemps- 
ville Councilman Garland Isdell who introduced 
the amendment after meeting with representatives 
from garden clubs in his borough. ■ 

Mrs. Dan Rodgers, President 
Kempsville Garden Club 

The Sun welcomes all letters from its read- 
ers. Names will be withheld on request, but 
please ihchide your name and telephone num- 
ber with your letter. Letters are subject to 
editing to meet newspaper style and space re- 
quirements. Write: Forum, Vir^nia Beach Sun, 
138 Rosemimt Rd, Virginia Beach, Va. 2345Z 

For your information, listed hfelow are regular 
meeting times and places for public bodies in 
Virginia Beach. All meetings are open to the public 
except when tlw groups vote to convene in 
executive (closed) session. 
- City Council meets everv Monday at 2 p.m. in 
the City Council chambers (second floor) of city 
hall in the municipal center complex off Princess 
Anne Road. 

Planning Commission meets on the second 
Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m. in City Council 
chambers. 

School Board meets the third Tuesday of each 
month at 2 pm^^^ the school administration 
^ building in the mtmicipal center complex. 

Development Council meets the third Tuesday of 
each month at 4:30 p.m. at the Vepco building on 
First Colonial Road near Hilltop Plaza. 

Erosion Commission meets the third Tuesday of 
.^^each month at 4 p.m. at tte F & M Bank building at 
31st Street and Pacific Avenue. 

Parks and Recreation Cofflhtission meets the 
second Wednesday of each month at 3 p.m. in City 
Council chambers. 

Arts and Humanities Conimission meets tl^ 
second Tuesday of each ttiwith at 4:» p.m. at the 
Vepco building on First Colonial Read. 

Wetlands Board meets the third Tuesday of each 
month at 9:30 a.m. in City Cwmcil chambers. 

Library Board meets the first Monday of each 
month at 10:^ a.m. at the Ken^isville branch 
library on Kem{»ville Road. 

IN ADDITION, listed below are addresses and 
telephone numbers for U.S. congressmen. The city 
of Virginia Beach is in two congressional districts. 

Rep. G. William Whitehurst (second 
congressional disU*ict), 424 Cannon House Office 
Building, Washington, DC. 20515. <Phone 1-202-2S- 

4215. 

Rep. Robert W. Daniel Jr. (fourth congressional 
district), 1331 Longworth House Office Building, 
Washii^ton. DC. W&15. Phone 1-202-2^-6366. 

Sen. William L. Scott. 2121 Dirksen Senate Office 
Oiildii^. Washington. D.C. 20510. Phone 1-202-2S- 
2023. 

Sen. Harry F. Byrd, 417 RiBsell Senate Office 
BuiMing. Washington, D.C. asiO. PlKme \-2ai-m- 
40S4. 



Tidings 

By 

?4eal 
Sims 

Sun Editor 

Searching for a 




$1911 i 



E. Joseph Wheeler, president of the Virginia 
Ambassadors, found himself caught between a rock 
and a hard place a few weeks ago. 

Mr. Wheeler, jM-esident of a brand new World 
Football League franchise — at that time, the 
Washington Ambassadors — had a football team 
with no place to play. 

The City of Norfolk was making overtures to Mr. 
Wheeler, urging him to relocate his team where it 
was welcome, but the guess here is that Virginia 
Beach played just as large a role in Mr. Wheeler's 
decision to move his fraiKhise to Tidewater. 

IN WASHINGTON, the Ambassadors were 
XwMng for a stadium. The Redskins had an ex- 
clusive contract for use of RFIfr Stadium, and they 
weren't willing to sell, especially to another football 
team. Mr. Wheeler turned first to Maryland, but the 
Naval Academy's stadium in Annapolis would have 
required a $400,000 investment for lights. 

Hungry for major league sports, Norfolk stei^>ed 
in and offered Foreman Field, complete with 
lighting, parking and seats — all inadequate. 

At the time, Mr. Wheeler was appealing to 
Washington, D.C. Mayor Walter Washington to 
intervene on his behalf in the dispute with the 
Redskins over playing in RFK Stadium, but Mayor 
Washington wasn't returning his phone calls. One 
Norfolk city official confided that the WFL had told 
Mr. Wheeler to find a stadium or forget it. 

Under that pressure, Mr. Wheeler studied Nor- 
folk's offer and decided that Tidewater was better 
than nothing. * ^ 

AMBASSADOR OFFICIALS made it clear that it 
was a Tidewater team, not just a Norfolk franchise. 
At a press reception last week, Mr. Wheeler em- 
phasized that the team was knovtm as the Virginia 
Ambassadors — not the Norfolk Ambassadors — 
and said their success depended on a six-city effort. 

Ed Cain, assistant to Mr. Wheeler, noted that the 
proximity of Virginia Beach to Norfolk played a 
major role in the Ambassadors' decision to move to 
Tidewater, Mr. Cain pointed out that the population 
of Tidewater was one million, but because of Vir- 
ginia Beach tourists, the summer population swelled 
to 1.6 million. With the WFL season opening Ju- 
ly 10, those visitors are potential customers. ^ 

Nevertheless, despite front office claims that the 

Ambassadors are here to stay, the situation is far 

from permanent. After all, the team is still the 

^ Ambassadoi^, a name tied more to the diplomatic 

whirl of Washington than the sunny seashores of 

^Tidewater. 

Mr. Wheeler has often repeated that Foreman 
Field would not keep him here. He has told Norfolk 
officials that the Ambassadors needed a new 
stadium by 1977, and he wants a waiting list di 
season ticket buyers. 

MEANWHILE IN Washington, the situation looks 
inviting with the exception of the stadium problem. 
The Redskins are a regular sell-out, and they have 
a waiting list of 50,000 fans chomping at the bit to 
purchase season tickets. More than likely, the 
football followers there would welcome a summer 
replacement for the Redskins. 

With tourists also flocking to the nation's capital 
and with no professional baseball to watch, the 
summer season in Washington would be promising 
if Mr. Wheeler decided to return. 

Before Tidewater goes on a spending spree to 
remain attractive to professional football, Norfolk 
promoters would do well to remember their 
treatment at the hands of Earl Foreman and the 
Virginia Squires. The Ambassadors may go the 
way of the Squires and the Red Wings. Until then, 
keep in mind that part interest in the team lies in 
Virginia Beach. 



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HASSLES 



By 

Donna 
Hendrick 
Feeders are for 
fender-benders 

A small red car with an out-of-state license plate 
is zipping along the Laskin Road feeder road. 

The driver, a tourist, starts to pass an in- 
tersection in the feeder road just as a blue car 
decides to leave Laskin Road via the same feeder 
road intersection. 

The blue car makes a quick right onto the feeder 
road and smashes into the red car. 

The driver of the red car didn't see a stop sign or 
a yield sign. But she is supposed to "know" that she 
must yield to traffic on the main road. 

Sound familiar? 

IT'S THE CONTINUING problem of the feeder 
road frenzy or the feeder road fracas causing a 
feeder road fender-bender. 

Supposedly, we wouldn't have so many feeder 
road fracases if there was a sign somewhere telling 
I he driver on the feeder what to do: Stop at each 
little intersection; look over his or her shoulder to 
see if someone is signaling for a turn onto the 
feeder; proceed with extreme caution; watch out 
lor the nuts who don't give turn signals. 

But there aren't any such signs. And there are a 
heck of a lot of intersections with no stop signs, no 
yield signs, no nothin'. 

It seems especially insane to expect drivers to 
"know" the rules of the feeder road when we are 
inundated with hordes of out-of-towners each 
summer, and newcomers are moving here at the 
rate of 1,200 per month. 

VIRGINIA BKACH BOUI.EVAHI) may lose its 
feeder roads when the boulevard becomes a six- 
lane highway. The state and local highway people 
are still kicking around the boulevard feeder road 
problem, and nobody yet knows what's going to 
happen. It will probably be three years before the 
project is completed. 

If it does lose the feeder roads, that's got to be 
good news to anyone who has ever tried to avoid the 
boulevard traffic by driving on the feeder?. 

The first problem is that the roads are for two- 
way traffic on either side. An experiment to make 
each side one way near Independence Boulevard 
( which a lot of drivers applauded heartily ) ended in 
dismal failure when some shop owners on the side 
of the road griped about it. 

THERE IS ABSOLUTELY no rationale to the fe- 
eder roads. Rather than help the flow of traffic, 
they seem to hinder it by ending abruptly or turning 
into wrong-way roads. 

The feeder directly in front of Princess Anne 
Plaza is a good example of this madness. One could 
be driving merrily along and suddenly face huge 
red signs screaming "wrong way — do not enter." 

Then one must detour through Princess Anne 
Plaza to get off the road or try to cross the 
boulevard at the intersection. Why have the darn 
things at all if they don't go through? 

Then there are the drivers (you've seen them, 
I surely) who are completely at a loss about the 
combination stop signs and signal lights at some 
' feeder road intersections. 

A DRIVER STOPS obediently at the stop sign, 
looks right and left over his shoulder and prepares 
to make a left turn onto the main road. Then he 
stops in puzzlement. 

Does he go on the red light facing him after he 
turns left or the green light facing him before he 
turns? Does he ignore the lights and follow the stop 
sign directions? Does he ignore the stop sign and go 
with the red and-or green light? What the heck 
does he do? 

A few signs might solve his problem . But it seems 
the more signs that go up, the more confusing the 
sitifition seems to get. 

The all-time classic feeder road sign is the one 
first glimpsed upon entering Virginia Beach from 
Norfolk on Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

PKTURE A TOURIST, fresh from somewhere, 
entering Virginia Beach. The first sign says. 
'Welcome to Virginia Beach - World's Largest 
Resort City." 

The next sign directs, "Left turn traffic use right 
lane," or some such nonsense. 

"Now let's see." our tourists muses as cars begin 
honkingand overheating behind him. "I want to get 
in the right lane to make a left turn. Therefore, if I 
want 6?make a right turn, do I get in theljpft lane?. 
And Where's the lane? And which light do l obey? Is 
th^ stop sign for me? Why are all those cars 
honking?"- 

We leave our tourist friend still sitting^t the 
intersection and vowing to go to Myrtle Beacn next 
year where, hopefully ,1W*R)dy evepjieard of feeder 
roads. 

Beach firm to direct 
education conference 



f 



Echicators from throughout 
the country are expected to 
attend the first annual National 
Conference on Informal 
Education conducted by 
Inservice Educalimi Associates 
of Virginia Beach Thursday 
through Sunday in St. Louis. 

Inservice Education 
Associates is a private 
educational consulting firm 
offering services to school 
systems and teachers. The firm 
specializes in informal or 
"qpen" education techniques as 
pioneered in England and 
Canada. 

Awroximately 500 eAicatore 
are expected to attend, same 
from e far away as Pu«1o 
Rico, uid a spokeinMn fir the 
Vir^M iletich firm. 



PRINCIPAL conference 
spealiers will be Sandra and 
John GacteU of Old Dcaninion 
University's School of 
E(hicatioa The Gadells are also 
executive directors of the 
National Open Education 
Association, an information 
cutler on open educatiwi. 

Expected to attend the 
conference are Head Start 
directors and teachers, private 
pre-school teachers, school 
district administrators, 
university teachers, 
supervisors and curriculum 
specialists in state deiartments 
(rf education. public 
kindergarten and primary 
teaehers, elementary school 
|riiKt|»li and ^rcMs. 



fciee/ 



by Rod Mmktk 




With chalk in hand, 11 -year-old Vincent Car- 
penter is ready to have his cast signed by a 
visiting professional football player at the 



Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters. 
Vincent was in the hospital a few weeks and is 
now back home in Chesapeake, 



Tlic Sun Wednesday, April 24, 1974 Page A-3 

Bands abound 
during festival 

The old tune "I Love a Parade" could well be a 
secondary theme for the 1974 Neptune Festival scheduled 
for Sept. 27 to Oct. 6. T^e festival will feature four major 
parades with dozens of activities scheduled around them. 

The King's Royal Armada and the Community 
Torchlight Parade will begin the festivities Sept. 27, Boat 
owner^nd clubs are invited to join in (he Royal Armada 
water parade. The Torchlight Parade is a marcl^ing 
competition fM- junior high schools. 

Special guest bands, however, also will be featured in 
the Torchlight Parade. The U.S. Naval Academy Band 
from Annapolis and Virginia's Madison College Band are 
planning to participate. A street dance offering three 
bands with a variety of music and a seafood feast will 
follow the parades. 

During the 10-day festival, there will also be an East 
Coast and Castle Classic, a youth Boardwalk Art Show, a 
fishing tournament, soccer match^, H rodeo, bicycle 
filets, a boat regatta and rowing championships. 

YOUTH DAY is Oct. 4 when Virginia Beach Schools 
will not be in session. A youth parade will feature a float 
and marching youth club contest. It will end at Mt. 
Trashmore where there will be a milk carton boat race 
and time-trials for the ninfe-state Regional Soap Box 
Derby Race. 

The final festival parade will fdlow the crowning of 
King Neptune and the Grand Coronation Day Parade Oct 
5. The parade will offer the Virginia State Senior High 
School Band Championship competition, a miUtary bands 
awards competion and a special guest units awards 
contest. 

Float enU"ies in the Coronation Parade may not be more 
than 14 feet high or 15 feet wide. The theme fw the parade 
is "Man and the Sea." All floats must be fireproof and rain 
resistant. 

Further parade and float competition information may 
be obtained from parade director Capt. R.C. Mandeville, 
Virginia Beach Neptune Festival, P.O. Box 390, Virginia 
Beach, 23458. Capt. Mandeville must receive all entries by 
July 1. / 



Forum survey rates Ervin 
No. 7 Beach councilman 



Vice-mayor Reid Ervin 
ranked number one in 
performance on the Virginia 
Beach City Council in the 
results of a questionnaire 
circulated by the Virginia 
Beach Forum in February. 
Councilman George Ferrell 
came in last in the ratings. 

The Forum, a political 
organization which recently 
endorsed candidates for the 
May City Council election, said 
it mailed the questionnaire to 
500 homes selected from the city 
voter registration list. The 
group received a 25 per cent 
return otthe questionnaire— or 
about 125 replies. 

. Of those 125 registered voters, 
92 per cent ranked the vice- 
mayor as satisfactory or atMve 
in his performance on the 
Council. He was followed by 
R(*ert Callis (86 per cent), 
John Baum (85 per cent), 
Charles Gardner (84 pier cent). 
Garland Isdell (78 per cent), 
Robert Cromwell and Floyd 
Waterfield (76 per cent). Dr. 
Clarence Holland (69 per cent), 
Curtis Payne (65 per cent), 
Murray Malbon, (62 per cent) 
and George Ferrell (53 per 
cent). Mr. Malbon was the only 
councilman to receive zero per 
cent in the excellent rating 
column, but 62 per cent of the 
people said his performance 
was satisfactory. 

TIIK PKRCKNT.'VGK OF 

persons who said they would 
support a councilman fw re- 
election did not in any case 
equal the percentage (rf persons 
who rat^ a councilman as 
excellent or satisfBCtory. 
Whereas 92 per cent of the 
group polled said Vice-mayor 
Ervin was doing a' satisfactory 
or above job, only 89 per cent 
said they would support him for 
re-election. The difference 
between re-election supporters 
and Vno&e who gave a 



councilman satisfactory rating 
ranged from four to 14 per cent 
of the citizens. • 

The Forum questionnaire also 
asked the citizens to rank the 
.top five issues or problems of 
concern in the city from a list 
supplied lo them. As could be 
anticipated, problems resulting 
from rapid growth were ranked 
most often as the number one 
city concern, piher problems 
most often listed in the top five 
as important included dumping 
of raw sewage into the 
Chesapeake Bay and the ocean 
between Cape Henry and 
Norfolk, funding of the 
volunteer fire and rescue Squad, 
construction ,of additional 
elementary and high school 
classrooms and bringing 
parimutuel betting to Virginia 
Beach after a local referendum. 

Among opinion questions 
included in the poll, 79 per cent, 
or 98 out of the 125 persons 
answering, agreed that the 
mayor should be elected 
directly by the voters rather 
than by the councilmen. and 80 
per cent believed a councilman 
should make an annual 
financial disclosure including 
all his property holdinp in the 
city. Those polled also were 



strongly in favor (93 per cent) of 
local tax relief for low-income 
persons over<«ge 60. 

OTHER OPINION questions 
(rffered four multiple choice 
answers. Not all questions 
included all the alternatives a 
persons could * consider, and 
some questions and answers 
appeared ambiguous. Among 
those questions which may he 
significant, 41 per cent qf Ite 
citizens said a councilman' 
should be allowed to serve as 
long as he could get elected, 
while 39 per cent said a person 
should serve no more than two 
four-year terms. However, the 
only other alternatives offered 
on the questionnaire were to 
serve one four-year term or no 
opinion. 

A majority of the persons 
answering the questionnaire 
believe the city's volunteer fire 
and rescue squads should be 
financed by the city. On a 
question concerning what 
should be done about the rate of 
growth in the city, 49 per cent 
(or 61 persons) said more 
comprehensive planning was 
needed. On a question asking 
how to provide adequate 
services for all Beach citizens, 
44 per cent (or 55 persons) said 
the numl)er of persons allowed 



to live in Virginia Beach should 
be limited. 

The Forum recently endorsed 
five candidates running for the 
Virginia Beach City Council in 
the May election. They were 
Pat Standing and Edward Lynk 
in the at-large race, Gaynette 
Winter in the Bayside Borough, 
Garland Isdell for the 
Kempsville Borough seat and 
Reid Ervin in tire Lynnhaven 
Borough contest. 

Forum President Robert 
Warren ^ said candidates 
endorsed ."are the candidates 
that are most concerned with 
the issues indicated in the 
sample (th& questionnaire)." 

Results of the Forum 
questionnaire were not released 
until after the organization 
endorsed the five candidates. 



BEST PICTURE 
OF THE YEAR 



^ Ai .11 ilfl.l \t' n Mill HIM ^3Ai 

THE STING X 

WINNER OF 7 ACADEMY AWARDS 



...all It 
takes Is 
a little 
Confidence 






Paid Political Advertisement 

YOUR CHOICES IN 
THE CITY COUNCIl 
EtECTION MAY 7TH 

Bayside Borou|h 



'# 



At Large Candidates 
(Vote for No More Than 2) 

Saudi Rolin 
Robert Cromwell 
Peter Joy 
Drewry l.hllc 
Edward l.vnk 
REBA MtTI.AN.^N 
Cecily M«rI>oimM 
Murray Malbon 
Meyera Oberadorf 
Phillip Muldrz 
Robert K. W. Sparrow 
Joel Smith 
Patrick Standimt 

Pleas« volo far REBA McTLANAN. You 
may al»o vote for aav other al-iarge candi- 
date of your choice. 

Fy Aythnrih >,} SHim M .Srov, Tnwrer RFRA SUXLANAN CampoiKi Commtiwe 
Viniel Barne* 12 ! ti7«l , tampai|B Managw Mariim Fwfhler. 340 7743, Campaiisn CoOrdinatw 



(Vole for one) 

Dr. C. E. Ilollaad 

Gaynelle Winter 

Kempsville Bor«u{h 

(Vote for one) 

(inrland iKdell 

Dr. Henry McCoy 

Lynnhaven Borough 

(Vote for one) 
F. Reid Krvin 
John (irifTin 

Fun^o Boroup 

(Vole for one) 
Flovd Walcrfield 

None of Ihe al)ove candidalea are 
ruanins againat REBA MCCLANAN 



Paid Political Advartisement 




JOHN 
GRIFFIN 

Candidate 

for 

. CITY 
COUNCIL 



Remarks of John Griffin to a group of citizens at the residence of Mrs. 
Betty Romulus, 956 Larkaway Ctf^tellamy Manor. 

Virginia Beach fe blessed with literally hundreds of dedicated and hard 
working employees. Each deserves the respect and support of every 
citizen of our community. These employees are spending long hours 
working to make our life more enjoyable and they deserve our thanks 
and encouragement, -^ 



«s». 



<i^ 



Their efforts deserve both recognition and reward beyond that of mere 
financial compensatioi. They should be encouraged to strive for higher 
goals and still greater service. To this end 1 propose that initiative he 
rewarded by: 

1. Promotion of qualified employees from wlthiff:^^^ 

2. A cost of living index clause be included in all employee contracts 
which would likewise be applicable to employees who work without the 
benefit of a contract. ^- 

3. Establishment of a complete civil service system for all our 
employees. 

4. Greater utilization of imput from employees in determining city 
policy. 

5. Improved working conditiwis. 

City employees deserve to be treated as first class citizens They are 
wo-king for us in mir city. They deserve to enjoy the same uniqueness 
and attractiveness of life in Virginia Beach that others of us enjoy 

John Griffin 

(See Griffin's Posiiion on Cify Growth on Page A-9j 
Bj Aythority of Mary L. Griffin, Treatury 



- ' * "^ 



«■■ 



Features 



Page A-4-The Sun-Wednesday, April 24, 1974 



Counseling helps 
surgery patients 



H Sometime ago, I wrote a colump criticizing the 
Medical establishment for ignoring the 
postoperative mental health of women who have 
undergone mastectomies (surgical removal of the 
breast). 

- Typical of this insensitivity was the comment 
flrom an American Cancer Society spokesman (yes, 
a man) who admitted that many women suffer 
sfevere postoperative depression but who insisted 
that all these women were emotionally unstable in 
t^e first place. 

1 I ,\SKED women who had undergone this 
surgery to write to this column in order to share 
tbeir experiences with other readers. The response 
was overwhelming and my sincere thanks to the 
women who were kind enough to write, as well as 
my apologies for not answering each letter 
personally (alas, I am my own secretary). And I do 
l^npe readers will continue to write in about this, as 
well as other medical experiences. 

;^ These letters are not to be construed as a 
scientific study, of course, but simply the stories of 
individual women. On an upbeat note, all the letter- 
writers reported their husbands were 
understanding and supportive; however, the 
women I heard from all indicated marriages <rf^long 
duration. 

^ I DID NOT hear from widows, divorced, 
separated or single womea Some women wrote of 
excellent postoperative adjustment; the happiest 
letter was from a 38-year-old womafi who wrote, "I 
forget once in a while that I had a breast removed. 



My life has too much meaning ... and the man I love 
with all my heart is still my man." 

But oUier women wrote of endless pain and 
depression. These writers all had had radical 
mastectomies (a simple mastectomy removes only 
the breast; a radical also removes the surrounding 
skin and fatty tissue from tfie chest and armpit as 
well as the major muscles of the chest wall) . Here is 
a typical letter from a woman who underwent a 
radical mastectomy. She was operated on four 
years ago at the age of 56. 

"...I HAVE been so glad that it did not happen to 
me until then. I feel so srarry for younger women 
because there is no getting around the fact that you 
are mutilated, feel ugly and your body is strangely 
violated. 

"My husband was and is very understanding and 
kind about the whole deal. We had been married 32 
years then, which makes much difference. 

"However, there have been problems. I went 
into a deep depression for a long time. The doctor 
said it was partly due to estrogen withdrawal. I had 
been on estrogen six years before the operation. It 
was abruptly impossible to get any from any doctor 
afterwards. All my unpleasant menopau^l 
— symptoms returned and most are still with me. 



"THE DOCTORS tried anti-depressants along 
with the Predvisone (for x-ray treatment side 
effects) both with amphetamines. I nearly went 
nuts — nervous and sleepless. I wcniced on the 
exercises iac my arm as the doctors and "Reach 
for Recovery" suggested. However, I learned you 




do not recover and then go on narmally tttm there. 
One would need to do the exercises constantly at my 
stage of life to have normal, pain-free use of your 
arm. 

"In looking back the thing I mind most is I was 
given no choice. At a regular physical checkup, this 
"pucker" was discovered. I was sent to a surgeon 
immediately who said a biopsy must be done right 
away and if we find oincer the whtde excised I was 
in the hrapital in less than a wedc and spent most of 
that time in x-rays and prqwrations, to say nothit^ 
of arranging a big family Thanksgiving dinner. I 
should have spent the time researching. Did I need 
to grant them the right to do a radioriJBl would not 
now, at my age, having gixle tlu-ougn what these 
last three years have done to me and knowing my 
chances for survival are about the same at this age 
either way. I do not crave a long life for the fun of a 
low-quaUty existence." 

THIS WRITER concludes with a suggestimi for 
"Mastectomies Anoiymous" (she did not relate to 
the woman from "Recovery"). This seems an 
excellent idea (though I disagree with the 
"Anonymous" term — it suggests a stigma). 
"Reach for Recovery" is the only organization for 
post-mastectomy patients, and while the women in 
it are dedicated and capable, the program is run 1:^ 
the American Cancer Society, which in turn is 
dominated by male doctors. 

This suggested "6elf-help" program, by 
providing mutual suppwt, could probably do more 
for posh^rative mental health than the carloads of 
tranquilizers so generously dispensed by doctors. 



HOROSCOPe 



From 

AprHU 

to April 30 

ARIES: (Murdi n to AftU 
If- Aba Aries Aseradaot) - 
bnportant need to be very ef • 
flc^nt with detilto - give al> 
taitkm to poasUde opportini- 
ties in your envfrmnieiiL Be 
patient with real estate, in- 
heritance cr prqierty mat- 
ters. Curb impiilae — be cakn. 

TAURUS: <April » ta May 
9 — Also Taomi Asecadaat) 

— Concentrate on areas 
where you can adiieve now. 
You're in the driver's seat 
with what you know best Re- 
pairs may be necessary in 
your residence. Shop around 
and g^ several estimates. 
Romance {avortd. 

GEMINI: (May ntatau 
»- Also GemlBl Ascendant) 

— Continue pushing fanhrd 
your goal. Work with determi- 
nation on one project — don't 
scatter energies and enthusi- 
asm. Writing is favored and 
rdationah^H with close kin. If 
buying a hdtjiie investigate 
structural items. 

CANCXK: (June 21 to Jidy 
n — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Put finishing touches on 
plans laid in recent past — so- 
lidify the foundations. Some- 
one in an influential position 



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Bare feet, hair twirling, red ears 
are marlcs of strategy, nerves 



It is no accident that the 
Soviet Union's war of nerves 
against Alexander Solzhenitsyn 
and the Kirov Ballet couple, 
Valery and Galina Panov, 
among others, resembles a 
chess match of a few years ago. 
That was labeled, appropriately, 
enough "Russia vs. Rest of the 
World." 

"Yes, of course. Nerves are 
everything," exclaimed 
Denmaric's super grandmaster, 
Bent Larsen, when 1 asked 
him if chessplayers ever 
really had such things. 




wil;h Joseph Brown 



n. 



IP- 19 Ih Hole 



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John Scott on the Organ 
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The fact that a game is 
conducted beautifully for five 
hours means not a thing if a 
player lets the tension get to 
him so that, in the last minute, 
he zigs instead of zags, and 
winds up with Indian nuts in 
stead of money for a prize. 

FORMER WORLD champion 
Emanuel Lasker was the 
supreme psychologist. He didn't 
dwell too much on his 
opponent's move. (He felt there 
was more than one right move 
in a position.) He strove in- 
stead to play on his opponent's 
nerves by searching fa* the 
move that would most 
embarra^ him. Lasker played 
the man more than the 
chessboard — which in sports, 
or in business, or in life too is a 
pretty effective technique. 

Another former' champion, 
Jose Capablanca of Cuba, was 
also great at billiards. After a 
big pime, late at night at the 
1927 New Ycnk International 
Tournament, he went to a 
billiard table and ran off a 
break of 59, just to show 




Help the Blind, Buy a Broom From a Lion 
During Tlie 23rd Annual 



everyone the excellent 
condition of his nerves. 

Nerves are so much a 
give-away, it becomes 
imperative that a player's 
demeanor be a model of zombie- 
like impassivity. The 1948 wo(|d 
championship tournament, in 
Holland, was a disaster for 
extitleholder Max Euwe after it 
became an open secret that, 
whenever he was in a tight spot, 
his ears turned bright red. 

ONE STRIKING HABIT is 

that of America's newest 
international master, 21-year- 
old Jim Tarjan, of Sherman 
Oaks, CaUf. He will fiddle and 
twirl with his finger, throughout 
an entire game, the same Jock 
of curly hair that dangles over 
his f o-ehead. A successful gim- 
mick so far, but the ques- 
tion is: What will be do if he ever 
turns bald? 



The current master of 
psychological^ warfare is 
Brazilian Henrique Mecking. 
His technique at a Hastings 
(England) tournament was 
described amusingly for British 
Chess Magazine by 
International Master Raymmd 
Keene. 

Mecking would i:omplain 
loudly that his opponent was 
doing something which 
disturbed his concentration, 
and then bark an onter that he 
desist from what he was dring. 
Ttnjs he deman^d that George 
Botterill put away his cigarette 
lighter, the Victor Korchnoi 
st(9 playing with his hands, that 



William Hartston refrain from 
moving in his seat. 

THE CLIMAX CAME against 
21-year-old Ulf Andersson, of 
Sweden, considered on of the 
gentlest and pleasantest of 
persons on the international 
chess circuit As is his habit, 
Andersson kicked df his shoes, 
sat on me foot and dangled the 
other menacingly. 

Probably mindful of the way a 
swinging leg can swing, 
Mecking's complaint was 
modified to the mysterious 
order that Andersson please 
stop playing with his hands. 

Undoubtedly the Victorian 
novelist, Mortimer Collins, 
would have approved of 
Mecking when he noted ttiat 
"there are two cl/sses of 
man: those who are content to 
yield to circimistances and who 
play whist, and those who aim 
to control circumstances, who 
play chess." 



OLYMPIAD— 1972 
Skopje. Yugoslavia 



Ulf Andersson 
(Sweden) 



LajosPortisch 
(Hungary) 



SICILIAN DEFENSE 



l.P-K4_ 
2.N-KB3 
3.B-N5ch 
4.0-0 
5. R-Kl 
6.P-B3 
7.B-B1 
8.P-KR3 
9.P-Q4 
10.P-QR4 
11.N-R3 
12.PxBP 
13.N-B4 
14.P-QN4 
IS.PxP 
16.N-Q6ch 
17. B-R3 
18.NxNP 
19.P-N5ch 
20.PxN 
21.NxP 



P-QB4 
P-Q3 
N-B3 
B-Q2 
N-B3 

P-QR3 
P-K4 
P-R3 
Q-B2 

P-KN3 
B-N2 
PxP 

R-QNl 
PxP 
B-K3 
KK2 
N-Kl 
QxN 
K-B3 
Q-B2 
Resigns 




TuMday-W«dn«sday-ThurMiay-Frldoy 
APRIL 30. MAY 1. 2. and 3 

A Uon WM Knock At Your Door Botwoon 519 PM, 

This i$ rwt • cerrtr^tjwi . . . these Wlnd-macto prwiucts wt uwhri^and food quality. 
Yaw purchM* of any proAtct made by the workm of the Vir^nia Workshop for 
ttw Wind wW h^ #«• seme Wind ptnon • way to mttm a livirtB. « well as holding 
Mw LIMS ChA Ni ymr mm to carry on thair •xtensiva S^ht ConMrvation program. 




Got a house? 
Call the police! 

Living quarters are being sought for college 
students who wiU be coming to Virginia Beadi 
to work as summer police offic^^. 

Ai^roximatdy 40 young moi and women 
will require lodging from May 15 through 
Labor Day. Those who have rooms or other 
suitable lodgings v^idi the students might use 
s)K>uld contact the Virginia Beach Police 
Divisi(Hi at ^7-^55 for further informati(m. 



■«^ 



ACIOSS 



1. 

8. Band of 
«ral*M 

10. Small an 
U. Kimdtea- 

•otiiijr: t »^ 
M. In^nlfl^aat 
balaga^ 
Uiingai t wh. 

11. Talt <rf 
adrantarc 

IllJpaadi dtfMt 
# Vwd to be 
It. Pw a nho el a r 
to. Jfn««rialiM 
taaelwir of — 
n. Tawrtafi 



54. HtfAaw 
26. Smuc, paifaiB- 

tie panona 
tr. Public anamjr 

55. Goad 

W. Uokilyijr 
>l. ralryquaan 
U. Drival: 
U. Glaa^gb 



DOWN 

3. Ian or achod 

4. I>i|w AttiBff 

5. AaaunatiM 



lontacua 



paction of 
J t. fca ptg oa t: 



m. Uraanoth 
t7. SanU (oatri- 
baMontoa 



T. Nip* P«l" 
S. Banaehabad 
t. Baiaf 
awaraof 

tt IMta 

la. -A« — 



couki lie very beneficial to 
your income frt»n butineM. 
Be creative —make ^ididous 
dedsiaoi. 

L£0:(MyntoABg«tS 

- Aka Lea Aaecadaat) - It's 
fiiB q>eed ahead now. Push 
plana forward Use your crea- 
thrity — wmt cooperattveiy 
wiOi others. Midce adlust- 
mento in moo^ outflow if 
budget is strained. Attend to 
ne^ected correspmidence 
andaccounta. 

VmGO: (Aoinst n to S^ 
S-^Aba Vtrga AsixBdant) - 
You're fuU of enthusiasm and 
cneigetic {dam — be iddto- 
sopidcal about others not go- 
ing along witt your kleas. Be 
considerate of olhen and 
show sKredation to past fa- 
vors. Consider a new roman- 
tk interest 

LIBRA: (Sept » to Oct. St 

- Also Ubra Aseeadaot) - 
You are Qiinldng in conserva- 
tive, practical ways toward 
long-rtfige goals. Someone in 
financial professimi met now 
couki be beneficial to you 
later. Intuition and creativity 
are best utilized by woridng 
quietly akne. 

SCORPIO: (Oct a ta Nov. 
21 — Also Seoiflo Ascendaat) 

- Career matters can move 
ahead now as some sort of 
btodc or barrier appears to 
lift. Use you innovative ideas 
and talents, possibly in a co- 
operative endeavor vdth a 
partner. Usten to ottiers' 
ideas too. 



SAGITTARnS: (Nov. tt ta 
Dee. 21 - Alsa SagiiterlHS As- 
ecadaat) — Personal charis- 
ma is M^ and yon cmdd 
qwritle at a social aHyr now. 
Others couU be hoMile in 
their c«nmunications. Be 
(Mploroatic and soHwOi out the 
trouble. Attoid to your duUes 
first. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
An. If — Also Capleora As- 
coidaat) - "Lady Luck" fa- 
vors you now. Flan ahead on 
aoUd foundations. Weteome 
advice i^ assistance from 
others. Contact those in au- 
thority for personal benefit 
Uneqiected gifts or legacies 
may come now. 



AQUARIUS: (Jan. 21 to 
Ffeb. U — Alsa AqnarhB As- 
cendant) — Financial trans- 
actions — buying and selling 
— are favored now. Get ad- 
vice from eipcrts. Romance 
coidd culminate in a commit- 
ment, or (Mdren faring Joy 
with their achievements. 
Publicity and advertising are 
{avored. 



(Feb. If ta March, 
n - Alsa Pisces Ascendant) 
— Your Judgment cndd be 
foggy now. Get advice from 
eqxrts. Dont let worry wear 
you down — coitfact your in- 
ner intuitkn for answers. 
Proceed patiently and fvacti- 
cally. A business-pleasure 
trip possible. 



428-8500 




strictly 
Personal. 



Mom can't dose 



i §1$ 



on a mess 



By PAT and 
MARILYN DAVIS 
Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Why does my mother constantly complain about 
the way I keep my room? She keeps the rest of the 
house the way she wants it, and I like my room the 
way it is— messy. 

Mom complains about the ring around the tub. 
The makeup I leave out and the fact that my dirty 
clothes don't always end up in the hamper. Why 
can't she just shut the door and forget it? 

Marty 

Dear Marty: 

To answer your question— because she knows 
what is Ijehind the door! Home may be where you 
hang your hat, BUT it is not a hotel. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Daylight savings time may be working out just 
great for most people but it is a disaster at our 
house. My husband is constantly late for work and 
the children haven't gotten to school on time yet. 

Don't tell me to use an alarm clock. My husband 
just roils over, shuts off the alarm, and goes back to 
sleep. Dayli^t savings time is for the birds and we 
aren't birds. 

NoBird 

Dear No Bird: 

Why not {Hit the alarm on your side of the bed- 
out of reach. If the rest of the country adjusts, I'm 
afraid you'll have to join the flock. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My girl is mad at me and I'm afraid she may 
never see me again. I casually mentioned that we 
would go to a certain movie Friday night. Well, 
Friday came and I got involved fixing my buddy's 
car. The first thing I knew it was 8 p.m. and too late 
to go to a show so I kept working on the car until we 
got it fixed. 

I called Susie Saturday and told her I had become 
involved repairing a car and didn't remember our 
date until too late. With that she saia, "u you think 
Friday was late, &iturday is later. Bye." Before I 
could say a word, she hung up on me. How could she 
be so nide? ^ 



■k^ 



Joe 



actions were more 
You owe Susie an 



r Sdu^Mi on IMP B->7 



Dear Joe: 

Why do you think her 
discourteous than yours? 
apology. ., 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: \ 

I generally agree with yai but you really gave 
Sissy bad advice. She said that her mother-in-law 
had a heart of gold. Her one fault was that she in- 
sisted on knowing where Sissy and her husband 
were every moment. If they went on a wedcend 
trip, Mother wanted to be informed. Sissy wanted to 
know how to handle this and you told her to tell ber 
moth^-in-law to stop meddling. 

My mother-in-law hasn't seen us for over six 
months and she never calls. I was in the hosptal 
two montte ago and she still doesn't know about it. 
StK acts like she doesn't care if we are dead or 
alive. Tell Si^y I'll trade her even. 

Nancy 

Dear Nancy: 

Your mother-in-law is at tte end of the tightnqje. 
TTie trick is to walk in the middle. And this must be 
a difficult feat for all nx^h^s-in law. 

VHm:l^mdMm^Dg^ 1*1^^ Btm* Smi, 138 Rom- 
mmt Rmi, VW^Ot Btmk. F* 234 5Z 



^^'^mgmmmmi^mimmmmmmmmmmmmmmmii!^^ 



^wiw 



Gardenin g 



The Sun-Wednesday. April 24, 1974-Page A-5 



W'l 



Bermuda is 
suKed for 

seeding now 



Q. When can a Bermuda lawn be 
established? 

A. Cohimon Bermuda grass can be 
seeded at this time. Use only hulled feed 
for spring planting. Seeding rate should 
be two pounds per 1,000 square feet. 




questions & answers about lawns & gardens 



Q. Is there a green vegetable I can 
grow late in my garden? ' 

A. If you like spinach, you might want to 
try Swiss chard. This soft textured mild 
green has a nice leafy top and give you 
greens after spinach. When the leaves 
are about 15 inches tall, cut them off 
about two inches from the ground and you 
will get a complete second crop in several 
weeks. Another advantage is that Swiss 
chard will not bolt and go to seed during 
hot, dry weather. 



Q. What can I do now to get my lawn 
ready for hot, dry weather? 

A. One of the best preventive measures 
is to set your lawn mower high. Leave as 
much top as p(»sible to nourish the roots 
which will help the lawn survive dry 
weather in the summer. 



Q. How can seed com maggot be 
controlled in the vegetable garden? 

A. Broadcast diazinon (Spectracide) 
two per cent granular just prior to 
planting time. Most seeds purchased will 
have already been treated with an 
insecticide to help prevent maggot 
d^age. 



Q. My tomato plants are starting to 
grow. What should I do about training 
them? 

A. Best results are secured by training 
tomatoes to a single stem on a six-foot 
stake or in a wire or binded twine cage. If 
trained to a single stem, all suckers 
which develop along the side of the stem 
should be snapped off when about two 
inches long. The single stem should be 
tied at one-inch intervals with cord or 
twist ties. A relatively new development 
is to train a plant in a circular cage made 
from reinforced wire or square mesh 
fencing. The cage should be made 18 
inches in diameter and five feet tall. This 
provides excellent support. 



Hotline will be ^d to answer your questions about lawns and 
gardens. Send your questions to Iladbu, Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Compost helps gardens 



in recent years, with the 
increased interest in the 
environment, we hear more and 
more about organic 
gardening— that is, growing 
idants without using chemical 
fertilizers and pesticides. Both 
organic and inorganic 
gardening have their 
advantages and disadvantage. 
Most horticulturists agree that 
a combination of the two is Uie 
best kind of gardening. 

One of the first things to do in 
organic ^rdening is to build a 
compost pile. Your pile can be 
as large oc small as you want, 
depending on the amount of 
material you have to go into it. 
It should be located in 
a cool, shady corner of 
your yard, if possible. 

LETS SAY you will build a 
compost pile 4 feet square. You 
can begin by digging the soil out 



of the area to a depth (rf 6-12 
inchra. This sml can later be 
used in the j^. Next idace a 
layer a few inches deep of 
coarse sticks, twigs, and flower 
or v^etabte stems. Excess 
water can drain through this 
material and into tte hole. 

Once you have UUs base, you 
can add laj^rs of any plant 
material you have available 
which will decompose in your 
compost l>ile. Grass clif^i^, 
small twigs, leaves, pine 
needles, pine bark, pruning 
refuse, vegetable scraps, young 
weed and fruit peelings can all 
be veM. Avoid using mature 
weeds which will have gcme to 
seed and cause more weed 
problems when you use the 
compost. Also avoid using plant 
materials which you know are 
diseased or insect infested. 

Whatever plant material you 
use in your compcst pile, keep 



Garden club 
news and notes 



THE ANNUAL Daffodil Show 
sponsored by the Garden Club 
<rf Gloucester April 6 and 7 had 
2,000 visitors. There were 175 
entrants with 1,172 specimens 
and 66 arrangements. Garden 
Club of Virginia awards were 
given to eight entrants and 
Garden Club of Gloucester 
awards were presented to 11 
entrants. 



AWARDS were given to 15 
contestants in the recent 
"Shower <rf Flowers" flower 
show at the Norfolk Botanical 
Gardens sponsored by the East 
Ocean View, Bay Haven and 
Devon Manor Garden Clubs (rf 
Norfolk. More than 1,000 
visitors attended the show 
during the two days. 



CLEAN SWEEP Week is 
over, and the King's Grant 
Garden Club was busy during 
the week. Club members 
cleaned up the main entrance to 
Kill's Grant and performed 
maintenance chores on shrubs 
and bushes in the area. 
Members filled 12 plastic 



garbage bags with litter. King's 
Grant Elementary School 
allowed members to deposit the 
bags with the school's trash for 
the regular city garbage pick- 
up. 



A WORKSHOP in which club 
members made Easter baskets 
and corsages for residents d 
Lakeside Convalescent Home 
was included in the recent 
meeting of the Princess Anne 
Plaza Garden Club. Mrs. 
Richard C. Dunaja, accredited 
flower show judge, gave 
pointers to club members on 
entering flower shows. 



A CONTEST sponsored by the 
King's Forest Garden Club May 
1 for residents of the area will 
include judging of displays of 
May Day baskets ol fresh 
flowers on front porches or 
entranceways. Ribbons will be 
awarded to each street in the 
area. At the recent club 
meeting, members toured' the 
gardens and greenhouse of the 
Chesopeian Colony home (rf 
Mrs. M.H. Todd Jr. 





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the layers fairly thin, not ovefe 
inches deep for best results. 
Altonate these layers with 
layers of soil, peat moss or 
dried animal manures if you 
can get them. Keep a layer of 
s<nl on the top. 

LEAVE a depression in the 
pile to catch water. The [rile 
should remain continually 
moist but not soaking wet. You 
may need to sprinkle it during 
dry weather, especially during 
the summer months. 

The contents will begin to 
dec<Hnpo6e. How rapidly it does 
will depend on weather 
conditions and what kind and 
size (dant materials you put in 
the pile. Smaller twigs and soft 
materials decompose more 
rapidly than coarse materials. 

You can turn and mix the pile 
every 2 (m* 3 months with a fork 
or spade. Thu will hasten 
decomposition somewhat and 
will give a more uniform 
finished product which is known 
as humus. Humus is 
decomposed plant material. It 
is dark qpd spongy and has the 
ability to absorb and hold water 
andplant foods butallows excess 




EXTCNSIOM DIVISION 



water to drain through it. 

The humus will usually be 
acid which is alright for use 
around azaleas, camellias and 
other acid loving plants. But 
you may want to sprinkle lime 
on your pile occasionally to 
make it less acid if the humus is. 
to be used around non-acid 
loving plants. 

Humus can be mixed into 
your soil to improve its texture 
and give almost any plant a 
boost. Partially decomposed 
humus can be used as a mulch 
around shrubs and on flower 
beds. Humus mixed with 
garden soil is ideal for house 
plants, too. 




FRUIT 
TRIES 

Dwarf 4 Standord 



FLOWERING TREES 

Chfrry-Dogwoe^Red lutf 



SHADE TREES 

Whitt lirch-Rtd Maple, etc. 



Cm" Ligustrum .10 fMM6 



Azaleas 



from$1 



GARDEN PLOTS 
FOR RENT 

Hilltop Area 
(next to Zayres) 

Plots 2O'x50' priced $20.00 til Jan. lit. 

CALL 486-6546 




BED DINGPL ANTS 
Tomatoes -Pyperi- Strawberriw 
ROSES from $3.50 

Purple Wisftria - Hydrangtas 
House Plants • Hanging Baskets 



CEMETERY WREATHS 




•SpbTbiqp 



ilJr. . Complf te Garden Center 

^!fl ,S95() Providence Rd. Phone (2(12825 
■"' Mnndav-.Silurdiv 9 A..M..5 P.M. 
Sunday 12;. 10.4 •..'«) P.M. 




/^ 



XOLEMAN NURSERY'S 

SPRING GARDEN FESTIVAL 

Friday, Saturday & Sunday Only 

April 26, 27 & 28 

FEATURING GIGANTIC SAVINGS 
IN ALL OUR SHOPS AND NURSERY 



GIFT SHOP 

For tho first tlm9 Bvorythlng from our 
Olft Shops 10% off markod pricot, 

GARDEN SHOP 

• All Spring Bulbs 20% off mark«d prlc«f. 

• Cow Manure (40 lb. bag) Only $1.88 

• Pine Bark (3 cu. ft. size)..... $1.49 each or id for $13.88 

•^ine Bark Nuggets (3 cu. ft. size) $2.19 each or 10 for 19.88 

• Lime (50 lb. bag) - Apply to Lawn & Garden Now. ...Only 79* 

GREEN HOUSE 

Save $2.00 on AHHanging Baskets 
- Regular 8.95 baskets Now only $6.95 

NURSERY 

• Roses (over 3,500 to select from) full of buds and ready to bloom 

• Azaleas (many specials in all sizes) 

• Rhododendrons Regular 3.98 size Now only $3.29 

Buy 10 and really save 10 for $29.1 



■**^ 



^» '- 



Now only $1.69 each or 10 for $14.9S 



• White Dogwoods 

• Pink & Red Dogwoods 10% off marked prtcei 

• All shade trees .^..30% off marked prices 



SATURDAY & SUUOAY 

Eni(u the demonstration of "€HARMGLOW," one of the finest i 
!» appliances for gracious ouMoor living. (Light refreshments 
will be served as cooked.) 



COLEMAN NURSERY 

GARDENTOWN 

'THE HOME Of CHRISTMAS WONDERUND'' 



4934 HIGH ST.(RT.17) PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



SINCE 1942 



484-3426 



i^.^^^^fta«iia^^i^ 



mmmm 



Reli gion 



Page A-6-The Sun-Wednesday, April 24, 1974 



Church vs. racism 



NEW YORK - American 
churches are stepping up 
their campaign to encourage 
economic sanctions against 
the territories in southern 
Africa as the principal means 
of combating racial discrimi- 
nation by the white^omi- 
nated govemmoits. 

The National Council of 
Churches' Corporate Infor- 
mation Center has published a 
comprehensive study of 
Afloerican corporate involve- 
oMnt in southern Africa in 
which it urges the end of in- 
vestments in companies doing 
business in South Africa, 
Namibia, the Portuguese col- 
onies of Angola, Mozambique 
and Guinea, and Rhodesia. 

Entitled "Church Invest- 
ments, Corporations and 
Southern Africa," the report 
took more than a year to pre- 
pare. 

It comes as the climax of 
nearly 10 years of Protestant 
protests against U.S. corpo- 
rate investment in southern 



Africa. 

The report maintains tliat 
American noanagement has 
paid Up aervUx to donocratic 
ideas by using two basic arga- 
m«its to Jusjt^ their pdicles: 

1. That investment in soutti- 
em Africa will foster progres- 
sive diange, with economic 
advances |»-oviding more jobs 
for blacks and greato* educa- 
timtal opportiBiities. 

2. That inve^ment can in it- 
self be a tool of reform. , 

"Analyses by economists 
and sociologists using various 
statistical data and trends 
published by South African 
government, business and 
(x-ivate agencies show that 
foreign investment has 
brought no substantial im- 
provemoit in the standard of 
living for blacks and in fact 
has contributed to the worsen- 
ing of their condition," the re- 
port said. 

"American firms give no 
attention to the sheer magni- 



tude of misery and inroverty 
bladu si^r in Soufli Afri- 
ca." 

Research conducted by tiw 
National Council indicates 
that a bairic minimal level of 
^Ma month in income would 
barely begin to allevi^e pov- 
erty and poor nufritkn in 
southern Africa. However, it 
added, rnily S per cent of aU 
bladu in South Africa receive 
this mudi or more. 

Statistics gathered iqr the 
oooncU diow that as foreign 
invesbmnt in souOieni Africa 
increases, the income gap be- 
tween whites and blacks 
widens. The report duu-ged 
that long-range economic pro- 
grams have been devised with 
a "dear intention^' of keeping 
whites in power and that 
American investments ad- 
vance that goal. 

The churches have made a 
number of efforts to press 
their points about invest- 
ments in southern Africa. 
Ihey have brou^t pressure 




NEWSPAPER 



CARRIER BOYS 
AND GIRLS 










CEDAR WOOD 
HAMPTON'S 
PINEWQOD GARDENS 
GATEWOOD PARK 
GREAT NECK VILLAGE 
REGENCY APTSr~~= 
BELLAMY MANO»! 
WOODHURST ^ 
COUNTY VIEW 

TRAILER PARK 



MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
^\ If you would like to earn extra 
money and Hve in any of the 
areas listed below, call 
486-3430, Monday thru Friday 

THESE ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARE NEEDED 

72nd ST. AREA 
(OCEANFRONT) 

CARDINAL ESTATES 
59th STREET AREA 
WASHINGTON SQUARE 
ARROWHEAD 
WEBLIN PLACE 
— CAROLANNE FARMS 
AVALON HILLS 
CHANTICLEAR APTS. 
LAKE EDWARD 
GREAT NECK MANOR 



Call today and start aaming that extra monay right nowl 
486-3430 Circulation 



Religion Page Sponsors 



PRICE'S 

INCORPORATED 

BRAND NAME 

Appliances 

TV Stereo 




ASPHALT 

ROADS 

& 

MATERIALS 

Phone - 497-3591 



PRINCESS ANNE 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 

504 S. Military Hwy. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

Phone 420 ■ 1840 

John Deere Equipment 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonney Road 
Phone - 340-1161 




PEOPLE'S 
BANK 

OF VIRGINIA BEACH 



Offices Throughout Virginia Beach 

425-5077 
Firsi in Free Checking 
First in Saturday Banking 



THERE IS A 
D/FFERENCE 

TRY 

Beach Ford 



KEMPSVILLE 
PHARMACY 

5266 PRINCESS ANNE RD. 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 

497-3516 



on conxM-atkms doing bmi- 
neas in the area. They have 
sou^t legal and coi^nasian- 
al action. 

lliey have in^tued relief 
projects and 8U|q>ort for hu- 
nunitarian programs of so- 
called liberation movements. 
They have fostered economic 
sanctions and they have spon- 
sored research and educa- 
tional projects dealing with 
the issues. 

Church groups with heavy 
investments in Wall Street 
soldstodcin a mmber of al- 
l^edly offending oompaides 
or iHvught irtoddwldn' ac- 
tions. 

During the early 1960s 
many Protestant demmiina- 
tions passed resolutions de- 
idoring the soutton African 
situation. By the mid-19608 at^ 
tention was shifted to a float- 
ing credit arrangement of $40 
omllon for the South African 
goveniment fMwrided by 10 
U.S. banks. 

By Ok early IVTQs they had 
taken action also against Gulf 
Oil's nde in Angda and a 
General Motors investment in 
the South Africtti automobile 
industiy. 

In 1972 a coalition of six ma- 
jor protestant bodies was 
formed to file resolutions de- 
manding that corporaticns re- 
veal the f uU facts of their in- 
volvement in soutiiem Africa. 

A new organization, Churdi 
Project on U.S. Investments 
in Southern Africa, filed reso- 
lutions witti 18 companies 
concerning current or pro- 
posed activities. When sever- 
al cim^NUiies — inchiding Qie 
Burroughs Corp., Minnesota 
Miidng and Manufacturing 
Corp., Eastman Kodak, Ford, 
ITT, Texaco and Xenn — 
agreed to supply the informa- 
tion requested, resolutions 
filed with them were witti- 
drawn. A number of ottm* res- 
olutions are still pending. 




Climbing above the steeples 



CHURCH STEEPLES were traditionaUy the 
tallest point oi any building in many towns. 
But, new constructimi in Virginia Beach has 
surpassed most church steeples. This crane on 



a local condominum construction site towers 
over the steeple of Galilee Episcopal Church 
at 40th Street and Pacific Avenue. (Sun photo 
by Rod Mann) <:j 



Seniors see how to live 



One source of very real 
[deasure for myself is getting 
to know the senior membo? 
of my congregation. These 
folks, almost without excep- 
tion, are absolutely remark- 
able. They are bright, cheer- 
ful and interested in life and 
the world. Their graciousness 
and hospitality can only be 
marked as impressive. 

One wonders why some peo- 
ple seem to live a very long 
time having a rich expmence 




of living while otiiers seem to 
fade away into a dark hole of 
depres«ng s(riitude. 

Certainly there are mini- 
mum pi^^cal necessities. Al- 
bert Schweitzer at 90 was a 
strong man. His body was 
adequate to the demands he 
placed on it, but all of us are 
not so genetically blessed. 

Apart from accident and 
terminal disease, living many 
years has a massive amount 
of evidence to support the 
position that longevity is 
regulated by our attitudes and 
belief. To find this out, I have 
often asked the non- 
agenarians the secrets of 
their long Ofe. Without excq)- 
tion their answers have been 
COTisistent. 

One tMng these vivacious 
(ddsters have in common is an 
umar soul unduttered by hate 
and anger. People who hokl 
grudges, who grouse about in 
seardi of revoige, who let old 
hurts rankle, are the ones who 
bum out at an early age. 

The acid tongue is a very 
good index to a corrosive in- 
terior. Life is mw:h too short 
to fight everything that comes 



Xets Talk 

By 
Rev. W.L. Truman 



along, and this kind of fighting 
only shows the deep in- 
securities in whid) so many 
people live out Uieir lives. 

Another factor whidi I have 
noticed is that Uiese joyfiil 
ddsters are quick to forgive. 
They well learned long ago 
the lesson that forgiveness is 
deansing both for themsdves 
and others. Released from fiie 
tensions, argumrats, and the 
corrosion of anger, these 
super seniors have found a 
calm rest for both ^idr soul 
and body. 

Another item irtiich took me 
a while to get into focus is that 
they all have a fixed convic- 
tion about whid) their life is 



Need help? Phone-In TV 

700 CLUB 

featuring 

Pat Robertson 

8 PM weeknights 





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• • 



COMIVIUNITIES 




A THOUGHT 

FOR "^ 
TODAY 
Jr APRIL 24, 1974 

By 

-Rev.W.F.GraBdstaff 

Rmmanuel Baptist 

Church 



"The Greatest Criminal in 
the wcrld is the man that 
will stand as a s|»ritual 
leader while he does not 
accept the Bible as Gods 
Holy Authoritative and 
complete revelation to 
man," 



BAYLAKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Skofc M¥e 
V*. Beach - 464-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead - 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

CtaRh Sctool 9:30 AJI. 
Mom^ Wa^4> 1 1:00 A.M. 
VOTORS ARE m.W<M^ 



EMMANUEL TABERNACLE 
CHimCH-UPC 
157 Moniton Ave. 
(I block off S. Lynnhaven Rd.) 
Rev. Harold HuUon-Paalor 
Phone:'340-7333 
Sunday School - 10:00 A.M. 
Preaching - 7:30 P.M. 
Wednesday 7:30 P.M. 

Bible Study 
"Evefyone Welcome, Come 
Wordiip With Us" 



KEMPSVILI_E 
BAPTiST CHURCH 
5204 Princess Anne Road 
Rev. Chail« H. Jones 
Pastw 

Sunday School - 9:45 A.M. 

Wtrnhip 11:00 A.M. 

Training Union -6:15 P.M. 

Evening Worship - 7:30 P.M. 

Wednesday Evening - 7: IS P.M. 

Prayer Meeting and Bible Study 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
< CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

Rev. David Holstein, Pastor 

5514 PariiMwnt Ph. 497-«7e3 
Sunday School Hr. - 9:45 A.M. 
ftour of Triumph 10:50 A.M. 
Junior, Youth, A Adult 
FeOowship - 6:00 P.M. 
Hour of iMpmtim - 7:00 P.M. 
Wednesday md-week 
Vp-ait 7:30 P.M. 



RtXK CHURCH 

640KeinpsvaieRd. Ph. 499-3727 
Virginia Beach 

Sunday 

Sunday SchMl *-*i A.M. 

Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. 

Evening Worship 7:30 P M. 

Tuesday 

Morning Worship 10:30 A.M. 

Evening WoriWp 7:11 P.M. 

Thursday 

Morning Worship 10:30 A.M. 

Evening Worship »:Jt P.M. f 



1 



ST 



Assembly of God 



(Comer Va. Beach Blvd. 
O&ana Bhrd.) 

S. Bdler, Pastor 

428-5297 



oriented and related. Evi- 
dence pointing to siux^nful 
long life is related to one's 
ability to put together ex- 
periouKs so there is under- 
standing about life. Mthout 
that integration, life is a 
series of unezplainable 
shocks, sad perplexities, and 
rude bewilderments. 

One more characteristic 
these convivial oldsters have 
is that they never cease the 
input into their brains. Tliey 
read, they watch, iShey dis- 
cuss, and they are interested 
ki what is going oa. In short, 
they have lively minds. Of 
omrse, we have all met peo- 
ple with dead minds at the age 
of 40, or those niio live in tte 
past, and their body Just goes 
through the motions of life 
now. 

Someone witii an alert mind 
is growing older with soccess, 
and this calls for learning how 
to use newly found time and 
leisure wisely. In many cases 
these 90-year-old poions are 
ttie most iito^sting people of 
all because their incredible 
recall adds a pat:eptian on 
current events whicdi no one 
else has. 

I spent several hours with 
Dr. Roland Sainton, 86, pro- 
fessor emeritus from Yale 
University. He lectures in six 
languages, knows 12 
languages, and is now slwty- 
ing Polish. This Und of oldster 
is the super senior citizen 
and no rocddng chair for him. 
hi fact, he rides a l(^q)eed 
bike, and is now publishing his 
37th book. Sud) persons can 
teach each and every one of us 
about the living out of our 
lives. 



Ihe next time you meet 
stsneone who is way iq> there 
in age, take time to adc them 
die reason for ttieir kng life. I 
dare say among all of the in- 
dividuality they have de- 
veloped, you will hear the 
sure words of a stabilizing and 
calming influence of a strong 
faith, a vigorous mind, and an 
exdtemoit about tonorrjw. 






PASTORS 
Rev . John Oimenei Rev Ann Otmenei 



FIRSTCHURCH 
OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST 
Virginia Beach 
1341 Laskin Rd. 
Sunday 
Church Service 11:00 AM 
Sunday School 11:90 AM 
Wednesday 

Testimony Meetina 8:60 
PM 

Christian Scientist 

Reading Room 

(same address as above) 

Monday thru Saturday 

tlrOOam to3:eOPM 

Also Open Tuesday Evening 

T:eOPMtO»:MI»M 

Everyone is welcome to 
Study, Borrow, or Buy 
Authorized Christian 
Scientist Literature and the 
ICing James Version ol the 
Bible. 

Ctiristian Scientist Monitor 
is also available. 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 

4750 Baxter Rd.-Va. Beach 
hstor: W. F. Grandstaff 
Phone: 4974208 

Sunday School: 9:45 A.M. 

(All Ages) 
Preaching Service: 1 1 :00 AM. 
Evening Preaching: 7:00 P.M. 

Wednesday 7:30 PJI. 
Prayer A BiMe Study 
Varied Youth Activities 



WELCOME TO WORSHIP 
AND WITNESS WITH 

ST. MARK A.M.E. 
CHURCH 

J. Alton Butts, Minister 
17M Potters Rd. Virginia 
Beach, Va. 

Study Phone 428-1330 
Qiiveh School • 9:30 A.M. 
Divine Worship -WM A.M.g 
Wednesday- 7 :M P.M. 
"Vim Teaefaii^ Ministry 
Wednesday ■ 8:30 P.M. 
Hie Church at Prayn 




IlK Misl Famus bikit » tin NirM ' 

Ifyou have just moved. 
It's time to call your 
Welcortie Wagon hostess. 

Ptione 340-2131 

if you are interested in getting 
Information about t>elng a 
Welcome Wagon Hostess, till 
out the following coupon 

Name: 

AjJtlress: 

Ptione No.t .... 

*^ll to: Welcome Wagon 
3705 King*' Pt. Circle 
V«. Bch., Va. 23452 



'*:s*r 



AittaHkaMs 



mmma^i^m 



mmmmim 



'mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmitimm 



tmw^Fm^Fm^ 



..^ 



\S ports 



The Sun-Wednesday, April 24, 1974-Pag> A-7 



PREVIEW 



City gotf tourney set for Tuesday 



tte spriig Sfxxig season is grinding toward those 
crucial mid-season showdowns. The action this week 
could go a lone way in detemiing the Eastern District 
titUsts. 

In trade, BaysideandFirstCoIonial are off to the swiftest 
starte, with unblemished 3-0 recwds. Kellam is only a stqj 
beUnd with a 3-1 mark, pdsed to tak(^ over should the 
l^ders falter. 

IN TENNIS, First Cdonial and KempviUe hgy^ 
established thebselves as the powers to be contended 
with in the Beach. Both teams have suffered only one 
defeat on the seasoa The major roadblock to either 
team's title aspirations is d^ending titlist Maury. The 
Ctmunodores are undoifeated in district tennis action so 
far this season. 

In golf, First Cdratial and Kempsville Are again the 
dominant teams. The Patriots and the Chiefs have both 
suii>as8ed defending state titlist Princess Anne. First 
Cd^onial is und^eated on the seas(m, while the Chiefs onfy 
loss Mras a narrow setback to First olonial. 

Gotf 

For the past two years, the Beach has l>een the 
uncotested golfing power in the district The story 
remains the same only the names have been changed. 
Instead of two-time defendinc state champion Princess 
Aniie riding roughshod over the competition, First Colonial 
and Kempsville have established themselves as the 
league leaders with the Cavaliers a distant fourth. 

The final regular season matches of the season will be 
this Thursday. Princess Anne, Bayside, Norview and Cox 
will do battle on the Bed Wing course. Granby, Lake 
Taylor, Kempsville and pooker T. Washington will square 
off at Ocean View. First Colonial will wind up their season 
with a triangular match against Maury and Kellam at 
Oceana. 

Barring an upset, the Patriots will claim the regular 
season district title with an undefeated record. 

The city tournament is scheduled for Tuesday at Red 
WiDig with Cox as the host school. The teams should finish 
in ^is order: First Colonial, Kempsville, Kellam, 
Princess Anne, Bayside and Cox. 

Kempsville should test the Patriots while Princess Anne 
could push the Kellam for third place honors. Red Wing is 
the Chiefs home course and that advantage could woric in 
their favor, but the Patriots defeated the Chiefs on the 
same Red Wing course three weeks ago. 

Kempsville's Roger Savage must rate as the odds on 
favorite to capure individual city h(»i<n«. Savage is nine- 
under par for his two district rounds over the Red Wing 
course. 



Tfoclr 



A busy track schedule has all six Vii^nia Beach teams 
in acti(m this afternooa The slate fin<fe district power 
Bayside hostiivi Cox: Princess Anne travelling to 
First Cdonial; Kellam hosting Norfdk's Maury; and 
Kem[»ville at home against Norview. 

Bayside will be returning to action after a wedc lay off. 
The Marlins have breezed through their first three dual 
meet tests to tie for f int place in the district staiu